Tuesday, October 26, 1999

Mayor Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman - Sentenced for exposure - Port Huron

Also See:

Port Huron Mayor Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman - charged for sexual assaults [April 07, 1999]

Mayor Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman - Trial for CSC [October 06, 1999]

Mayor Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman - Sentenced for exposure [October 26, 1999]

Mayor Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman: Re-Trial [May 02, 2000]

Port Huron Mayor Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman sentenced for CSC [June 16, 2000]

         

2nd trial scheduled for ex-Michigan mayor
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
October 30, 1999

Port Huron, Mich. - A former mayor will be tried again in February on at least some of the felony counts that jurors could not reach verdicts on as they convicted him of exposing himself to nine underage girls.

The second trial of Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman is to begin Feb. 23, St. Clair County Circuit Court officials said yesterday.

Ackerman was sentenced Tuesday to a year in jail after jurors convicted him of nine counts of indecent exposure. Jurors couldn't reach verdicts on eight counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct, six counts of felony second-degree criminal sexual conduct, and two counts of felony child sexually abusive activity.
 













Fall from grace
Former mayor convicted of exposure
The Free Lance-Star
Fredericksburg, VA
Joseph Altman Jr.
Associated Press
October 27, 1999

Port Huron, Mich [AP] - Port Huron's tattooed, motorcycle-riding former mayor, once hailed as a role model for overcoming drugs and alcohol, was convicted yesterday of exposing himself to nine underage girls.

Judge Peter Deegan immediately sentenced Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman, 42, to a year in prison on the nine counts of indecent exposure.

The jury couldn't reach verdicts on 16 other counts of sexual misconduct.

"This conviction on these counts has nothing to do, Mr. Ackerman, with what you've done for this community. ...You could have won the Nobel Prize for Peace and if you would have acted this way this sentence would be the same," Deegan said.

The allegations involved 11 girls ages 8 to 15. In one instance, three girls - 9, 11, and 13 - testified they were together when Ackerman told them to take off their clothes and then performed oral sex on them.

Ackerman testified that he did nothing sexaully inappropriate to any of his under age accusers. He acknowledge two affairs with teen-agers - who were not among his accusers - and said there was a possibility that four girls could have seen him exposed accidently.

Ackerman, who once sported a ponytail, leather clothes and tattoos, was named Michigan Public Citizen of the Year in 1994. He was elected mayor of Port Huon three years later and resigned in April, one day after charges were filed.

Before he was escorted from court in handcuff Monday, Ackerman told the judge: "I'm willing to accept my convictions ... I spent 12 years in this community doing everything I could to contribute. I've helped numerous children in this community over a number of years."

Prosecutor Peter George said he expects to retry Ackerman on the 16 other charges.
 
 
 











Ex-mayor convicted on sex charges
The Tuscaloosa News
Joseph Altman Jr.
Associated Press
October 27, 1999

Port Huron, Mich [AP] - Port Huron's tattooed, motorcycle-riding former mayor, once hailed as a role model for overcoming drugs and alcohol, was convicted Tuesday of exposing himself to nine underage girls.

Judge Peter Deegan immediately sentenced Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman, 42, to a year in prison on the nine counts of indecent exposure.

The jury couldn't reach verdicts on 16 other counts of sexual misconduct.

"This conviction on these counts has nothing to do, Mr. Ackerman, with what you've done for this community. ...You could have won the Nobel Prize for Peace and if you would have acted this way this sentence would be the same," Deegan said.

The allegations involved 11 girls ages 8 to 15. In one instance, three girls - 9, 11, and 13 - testified they were together when Ackerman told them to take off their clothes and then performed oral sex on them.

Ackerman testified that he did nothing sexaully inappropriate to any of his under age accusers. He acknowledge two affairs with teen-agers - who were not among his accusers - and said there was a possibility that four girls could have seen him exposed accidently.

Ackerman, who once sported a ponytail, leather clothes and tattoos, was named Michigan Public Citizen of the Year in 1994.

He was elected mayor of Port Huon three years later and resigned in April, one day after charges were filed.

Before he was escorted from court in handcuff Monday, Ackerman told the judge: "I'm willing to accept my convictions ... I spent 12 years in this community doing everything I could to contribute. I've helped numerous children in this community over a number of years."

Prosecutor Peter George said he expects to retry Ackerman on the 16 other charges.
 
 











Former mayor faces charges
The Mount Airy News
October 27, 1999

Port Huron, Mich [AP] - Port Huron's tattooed, motorcycle-riding former mayor, once hailed as a role model for overcoming drugs and alcohol, was convicted Tuesday of exposing himself to nine underage girls.

Judge Peter Deegan immediately sentenced Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman, 42, to a year in prison on the nine counts of indecent exposure.

The jury couldn't reach verdicts on 16 other counts of sexual misconduct.

"This conviction on these counts has nothing to do, Mr. Ackerman, with what you've done for this community. ...You could have won the Nobel Prize for Peace and if you would have acted this way this sentence would be the same," Deegan said.

The allegations involved 11 girls ages 8 to 15. In one instance, three girls - 9, 11, and 13 - testified they were together when Ackerman told them to take off their clothes and then performed oral sex on them.

Ackerman testified that he did nothing sexaully inappropriate to any of his under age accusers. He acknowledge two affairs with teen-agers - who were not among his accusers - and said there was a possibility that four girls could have seen him exposed accidently.

Ackerman was named Michigan Public Citizen of the Year in 1994.

 
 
 











Ex-mayor convicted of indecent exposure
Sun Journal
Lewiston, Maine
October 27, 1999

Port Huron, Mich [AP] - Port Huron's tattooed, motorcycle-riding former mayor, once hailed as a role model for overcoming drugs and alcohol, was convicted Tuesday of exposing himself to nine underage girls.

Judge Peter Deegan immediately sentenced Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman, 42, to a year in prison on the nine counts of indecent exposure.

The jury couldn't reach verdicts on 16 other counts of sexual misconduct.

"This conviction on these counts has nothing to do, Mr. Ackerman, with what you've done for this community. ...You could have won the Nobel Prize for Peace and if you would have acted this way this sentence would be the same," Deegan said.

The allegations involved 11 girls ages 8 to 15. In one instance, three girls - 9, 11, and 13 - testified they were together when Ackerman told them to take off their clothes and then performed oral sex on them.

Ackerman testified that he did nothing sexaully inappropriate to any of his under age accusers. He acknowledge two affairs with teen-agers - who were not among his accusers - and said there was a possibility that four girls could have seen him exposed accidently.
 
 











Michigan
Former mayor gets prison
The Gadsen Times
October 27, 1999
Port Huron - Port Huron's tattooed, motorcycle-riding former mayor, once hailed as a role model for overcoming drugs and alcohol, was convicted Tuesday of exposing himself to nine underage girls.

Judge Peter Deegan immediately sentenced Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman, 42, to a year in prison on the nine counts of indecent exposure.

The jury couldn't reach verdicts on 16 other counts of sexual misconduct.

"This conviction on these counts has nothing to do, Mr. Ackerman, with what you've done for this community. ...You could have won the Nobel Prize for Peace and if you would have acted this way this sentence would be the same," Deegan said.

The allegations involved 11 girls ages 8 to 15. In one instance, three girls - 9, 11, and 13 - testified they were together when Ackerman told them to take off their clothes and then performed oral sex on them.
 
 












Former mayor gets 9 months for exposing self
Spartanburg Herald-Journal
October 27, 1999

Port Huron, Mich. - Port Huron's tattooed, motorcycle-riding former mayor, once hailed as a role model for overcoming drugs and alcohol, was convicted Tuesday of exposing himself to nine underage girls.

Judge Peter Deegan immediately sentenced Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman, 42, to a year in prison on nine counts of indecent exposure.

The jury couldn't reach verdicts on 16 other counts of sexual misconduct.

"This conviction on these counts has nothing to do, Mr. Ackerman, with what you've done for this community. ...You could have won the Nobel Prize for Peace and if you would have acted this way this sentence would be the same," Deegan said.

The allegations, involved 11 girls ages 8 to 15. In one instance, three girls - 9, 11, and 13 - testified that theywere together when Ackerman told them to take off their clothes and then performed oral sex on them.

Ackerman testified that he did nothing sexually inappropriate to any of this underage accusers. He acknowledged two affairs with teen-agers - who were not among his accusers - and said there was a possibility that four girls could have seen him exposed accidently.
 
 











Ex-mayor convicted of indecent exposure
The Vindicator
October 27, 1999

Port Huron, Mich. [AP] - Two years ago, Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman was elected mayor of conservative Port Huron. On Tuesday, the city was left divided after the former mayor - a ponytailed biker who was accepted and embraced - was sentenced to a year in jail on nine counts of exposing himself to underage girls. The jury couldn't reach verdicts on 16 other counts of sexual misconduct. Ackerman, 42, testified that he did nothing sexually inappropriate to any of his accusers. He acknowledged two affairs with teenagers - who were not among his accusers - and said there was a possibility that four girls could have seen him exposed accidentally.
 











Port Huron reacts to verdict in sex trial
The Argus-Press
Owosso, Michigan
October 27, 1999

Port Huron, Mich. [AP] - Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman was no ordinary politician when he entered the political arena in this conservative voting town.

"Here's a guy who's trying to make a positive impact on this community with unconventional looks but pretty conservative in what he thought," said Steven G. Miller, the city's current mayor.

"To the community's credit, here was a biker with substance abuse problems at one point and they opened up their arms and accepted him."

Ackerman was an alternative-looking, leather-clad biker with a long, bushy bear and a squiggly ponytail, but his former colleagues say the city embraced him. He received the most votes in the November 1997 City Council election, giving him the ceremonial role of mayor, and people rallied around his efforts to get more residents involved in local government.

"To me it was like the Cinderella story that has kind of gone bad," Miller said.

When allegations of sexual misconduct arose in April, many people gave Ackerman a second chance - this time hoping they were wrong about his criminal charges.

"He had a lot of people believe and support him," said Councilwoman Anita R. Ashford. "When it first came out you had a lot of people in disbelief. It does leave a bad taste, but I don't think it divided us...

"I was hurt for one reason only, because we gave him a chance and he was guilty," she said.

Ackerman was convicted Tuesday of nine inecent exposure charges. Jurors couldn't reach verdicts on 16 felony sexual misconduct charges. The allegations involved 11 girls ages 8 to 15.

Ackerman served an internship in the prosecutor's office that argued to convict him, Miller said. As mayor, Ackerman was involved in issues such as water quality, serving on a task force with the mayors of Detroit, Windsor, Ontario, and Sarnia Ontario.

He was hailed for taking strides to make government more inclusive.

"He opened up the government process, so more people would have a say," Miller said. "He brought in fresh blood and fresh people."

Miller said he never expected such allegations against Ackerman and most people reserved judgement after Ackerman was charged.

"Each person has to make their own judgment on how this affects the community," Miller said. "Who can make sense of what happened? It caught everybody by surprise."

Next week, voters will select a new City Council, giving the city what Miller called "a fresh start".

Tuesday's verdict, while not the highlight of every conversation in town, was on people's minds.

"I think it's a shame," said Ron Moesher, 51. "I feel bad for the girls. I sure hope they retry him and come in with a better case that gets a conviction."

Rachel Evans, 24, heard the verdict read in the courtroom and said she feared conflicting testimony from some of the alleged victims made jurors unsure.

"It's going to be confusing to adults, let alone children. Little kids are not going to make up these kinds of stories," she said.

Jerry Gardiner, 42, said it was good that the jurors were cautious.

"You have to be careful," he said. "If he's guilty, he should be put away. But if you convict him and then later they say it wasn't a fair trial, that doesn't do anyone any good."

St. Clair County Prosecutor Peter George said he plants to try Ackerman on the criminal sexual conduct charges again.

"This is just a lull in the action," Miller said.

 
 










Friday, October 15, 1999

Officer Paul Harrington - Murdered son Brian - Detroit PD - formerly

Also See:

Officer Paul Harrington - Murdered wife Wanda and son Brian

   




Vietnam veteran commits similar family slayings 24 years later
The former police officer's second murderous act came after a
maximum two-month sentence of psychiatric care
The Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) -- Authorities thought then-police officer Paul Harrington could lead a normal life after spending two months in a psychiatric facility for fatally shooting his wife and two children.

But 24 years later, Harrington ran out of medication, and his second wife and their 3-year-old son were shot dead too.

"The same thing happened in 1975," he said in a statement to police. "They should have put me away then."

On Oct. 15, Harrington's wife of 17 years, Wanda, and their 3-year-old son Brian lay dead on a couch in their Detroit duplex. Wanda had been shot in the temple while she slept. Brian had been shot three times in the head, police said.

Harrington, 53, called 911 and waited on his porch for officers. He faces two counts of first-degree murder and two felony firearm counts and is being held without bond.

The previous shooting was similar.

It was Dec. 19, 1975, when Harrington's 28-year-old wife Becky and their two daughters, Pamela, 9, and Cassandra, 4, were killed with Harrington's service revolver. The couple had recently separated.

Within minutes, Harrington turned himself in and took police to the murder scene.

Donald Cutler, Harrington's defense attorney in the original case, said he quickly realized his client was mentally disturbed.

"One evening at mealtime ... a phone rang, and he apparently had a flashback of what he called 'incoming mail,' and he thought he was under attack from the Vietcong," Cutler said he learned. "He took his service revolver he had with him and started shooting."

Recorder's Court Judge Susan Borman found Harrington innocent by reason of insanity in 1977 and sent him to a state hospital. Doctors released him after two months -- the maximum allowed by law.

Harrington, a Vietnam veteran and a Detroit police officer since 1972, was fired when he was charged with the triple homicide. But his life improved; he remarried and had two more children.

"He went on with his life, tried to work," said W. Frederick Moore, the Detroit attorney defending Harrington against the latest charges. "Along the way, he was married, he tried to deal with the situation."

But Harrington started having financial trouble. He was fired in April from his job at Hercules Drawn Steel in Livonia, where he worked for six years.

"The statement he gave police details a variety of setbacks, in my point of view, that impacted his ability to reasonably rationalize issues -- being fired, not having any money, worried about his family," Moore said. "It was taking a toll, he was going to the doctor, he tried to hang in there."

Detroit police Detective Sgt. Felix Kirk testified at a preliminary hearing that Harrington had run out of medications for his severe depression.

The drugs "keep me from hearing voices," Harrington told police.

"Had he been on his medication and had he had a (mental health) facility to utilize, probably it would have never happened again," Cutler said.

Officer Paul Harrington - Murdered wife Wanda - Detroit PD - fomerly

Also See:

Officer Paul Harrington - Murdered wife Wanda and son Brian

   




Vietnam veteran commits similar family slayings 24 years later
The former police officer's second murderous act came after a
maximum two-month sentence of psychiatric care
The Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) -- Authorities thought then-police officer Paul Harrington could lead a normal life after spending two months in a psychiatric facility for fatally shooting his wife and two children.

But 24 years later, Harrington ran out of medication, and his second wife and their 3-year-old son were shot dead too.

"The same thing happened in 1975," he said in a statement to police. "They should have put me away then."

On Oct. 15, Harrington's wife of 17 years, Wanda, and their 3-year-old son Brian lay dead on a couch in their Detroit duplex. Wanda had been shot in the temple while she slept. Brian had been shot three times in the head, police said.

Harrington, 53, called 911 and waited on his porch for officers. He faces two counts of first-degree murder and two felony firearm counts and is being held without bond.

The previous shooting was similar.

It was Dec. 19, 1975, when Harrington's 28-year-old wife Becky and their two daughters, Pamela, 9, and Cassandra, 4, were killed with Harrington's service revolver. The couple had recently separated.

Within minutes, Harrington turned himself in and took police to the murder scene.

Donald Cutler, Harrington's defense attorney in the original case, said he quickly realized his client was mentally disturbed.

"One evening at mealtime ... a phone rang, and he apparently had a flashback of what he called 'incoming mail,' and he thought he was under attack from the Vietcong," Cutler said he learned. "He took his service revolver he had with him and started shooting."

Recorder's Court Judge Susan Borman found Harrington innocent by reason of insanity in 1977 and sent him to a state hospital. Doctors released him after two months -- the maximum allowed by law.

Harrington, a Vietnam veteran and a Detroit police officer since 1972, was fired when he was charged with the triple homicide. But his life improved; he remarried and had two more children.

"He went on with his life, tried to work," said W. Frederick Moore, the Detroit attorney defending Harrington against the latest charges. "Along the way, he was married, he tried to deal with the situation."

But Harrington started having financial trouble. He was fired in April from his job at Hercules Drawn Steel in Livonia, where he worked for six years.

"The statement he gave police details a variety of setbacks, in my point of view, that impacted his ability to reasonably rationalize issues -- being fired, not having any money, worried about his family," Moore said. "It was taking a toll, he was going to the doctor, he tried to hang in there."

Detroit police Detective Sgt. Felix Kirk testified at a preliminary hearing that Harrington had run out of medications for his severe depression.

The drugs "keep me from hearing voices," Harrington told police.

"Had he been on his medication and had he had a (mental health) facility to utilize, probably it would have never happened again," Cutler said.

Officer Paul Harrington - Detroit PD - formerly



Fathers Who Kill
Mentally Ill or Malingering?
TruTV
http://www.trutv.com/library/crime/criminal_mind/psychology/fathers_who_kill/8.html



Paul Harrington

A program on Court TV's The System featured the case of a man who killed his entire family twice. War hero, Vietnam veteran, and Detroit cop, Paul Harrington shot and killed his wife and two daughters, 6 and 9, in 1975. Under questioning, he admitted that he'd been haunted by a raid in Vietnam, where he'd killed a mother and her four children. The incident had disturbed him for years. His sister said that after he came home from that war, he was never the same. Working as a cop had kept the memory fresh. He had trouble keeping himself balanced and stable, so he turned to alcohol.


He'd been to a psychiatrist to discuss his fear that he might one day harm his family or himself. (Some psychiatrists might say this was a way to stage a premeditated murder, but others cite it as proof of seeking help.) The psychiatrist Harrington saw urged him to stay with his family over the holidays, but that turned out to have been a bad idea. He seemed to just snap and within moments, his entire family was dead.

Harrington was medicated and put on a watch in a psychiatric institution for 17 months before he went to trial. All the experts agreed that he had been insane at the time of the crime. He was committed to the state psychiatric hospital. He stayed there for less than two months and was then released --assessed as not being a danger to himself or others. That was the law. Thus, a year and a half after killing three people, Harrington was a free man. No one monitored him. He sued the psychiatrist for not hospitalizing him when he needed it, and reached a settlement. Thus, he not only killed his family but also appeared to profit from it.

Harrington got married again in 1982 and had two sons. By the 1990s, he had a substance abuse problem, submitted again to psychiatric care for anxiety and depression, and in 1999 repeated his atrocity. He'd had hallucinations, he said, of being told to go kill people. In debt, with no car, no job and no money to buy his psychiatric drugs, he swung into a dangerous state and killed his wife and one of his sons.



Wanda and Brian Harrington

Again, he went on trial. Since he had borrowed his neighbor's gun the night before—which he used—the prosecution said it was clearly premeditated. Several psychiatrists testified once again that he had been insane—it was a flashback to the first incident. But Dr. Charles Clark for the prosecution tested Harrington and said he was malingering a mental illness. Clark did not accept the idea that Harrington was suffering from Vietnam flashbacks. Apparently, his opinion carried the most weight.


This time Harrington was found guilty and received a life sentence.

Even so, the families of the victims claim that the mental health system had failed them all. Had he been given the help he needed the first time, they believe, the string of tragedies could have been avoided.

Harrington's mental problems were well-documented, but sometimes a clever psychopath can convince a lot of people that he's mentally ill. Both men in the following two cases told countless lies, trying to make their crimes appear to be the result of forces beyond their control.


             











 http://www.prodeathpenalty.com/repeat_murder.htm
UPDATE - 11/1/00 - A former police officer who was charged with killing his wife and children in 1975 has been convicted of murdering his second wife and 3-year-old son. Paul Harrington, who was found innocent by reason of insanity 25 years ago and served two months in a psychiatric hospital, now faces a mandatory sentence of life in prison without parole. "We're glad this man will not hurt anyone else again," Chester Trail, a relative of Harrington's second wife, told the Detroit Free Press in Wednesday's editions.
Harrington killed his wife Wanda Harrington, 47, in October 1999, then shot their son, Brian, 3. Harrington, 53, called 911 and waited on his porch for officers. Sentencing was scheduled for Dec. 1.

Harrington's attorneys mounted an insanity defense, arguing that he had been diagnosed with major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. In 1975, Harrington - recently separated from his 28-year-old wife, Becky - killed her and their two daughters, Pamela, 9, and Cassandra, 4, with his service revolver.

               













Vietnam veteran commits similar family slayings 24 years later
The former police officer's second murderous act came after a
maximum two-month sentence of psychiatric care
The Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) -- Authorities thought then-police officer Paul Harrington could lead a normal life after spending two months in a psychiatric facility for fatally shooting his wife and two children.

But 24 years later, Harrington ran out of medication, and his second wife and their 3-year-old son were shot dead too.

"The same thing happened in 1975," he said in a statement to police. "They should have put me away then."

On Oct. 15, Harrington's wife of 17 years, Wanda, and their 3-year-old son Brian lay dead on a couch in their Detroit duplex. Wanda had been shot in the temple while she slept. Brian had been shot three times in the head, police said.

Harrington, 53, called 911 and waited on his porch for officers. He faces two counts of first-degree murder and two felony firearm counts and is being held without bond.

The previous shooting was similar.

It was Dec. 19, 1975, when Harrington's 28-year-old wife Becky and their two daughters, Pamela, 9, and Cassandra, 4, were killed with Harrington's service revolver. The couple had recently separated.

Within minutes, Harrington turned himself in and took police to the murder scene.

Donald Cutler, Harrington's defense attorney in the original case, said he quickly realized his client was mentally disturbed.

"One evening at mealtime ... a phone rang, and he apparently had a flashback of what he called 'incoming mail,' and he thought he was under attack from the Vietcong," Cutler said he learned. "He took his service revolver he had with him and started shooting."

Recorder's Court Judge Susan Borman found Harrington innocent by reason of insanity in 1977 and sent him to a state hospital. Doctors released him after two months -- the maximum allowed by law.

Harrington, a Vietnam veteran and a Detroit police officer since 1972, was fired when he was charged with the triple homicide. But his life improved; he remarried and had two more children.

"He went on with his life, tried to work," said W. Frederick Moore, the Detroit attorney defending Harrington against the latest charges. "Along the way, he was married, he tried to deal with the situation."

But Harrington started having financial trouble. He was fired in April from his job at Hercules Drawn Steel in Livonia, where he worked for six years.

"The statement he gave police details a variety of setbacks, in my point of view, that impacted his ability to reasonably rationalize issues -- being fired, not having any money, worried about his family," Moore said. "It was taking a toll, he was going to the doctor, he tried to hang in there."

Detroit police Detective Sgt. Felix Kirk testified at a preliminary hearing that Harrington had run out of medications for his severe depression.

The drugs "keep me from hearing voices," Harrington told police.

"Had he been on his medication and had he had a (mental health) facility to utilize, probably it would have never happened again," Cutler said.

                 












Tragic story has more fatalities
After '75 deaths, man again accused of murder
January 25, 2000
BY SHERYL JAMES
FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER
http://www.freep.com/news/locway/harr25_20000125.htm


Shortly after he allegedly killed his wife and 3-year-old son last October, Paul Harrington sat face-to-face with Detroit homicide detective Sgt. Felix Kirk, and told him the story -- the whole story.

Wanda and Brian Harrington were killed Oct. 15 at their Detroit duplex.

"The same thing happened in 1975," Harrington said. "They should have put me away then."

Harrington had committed an almost identical crime in 1975. He killed his first wife and two daughters, then called 911 to confess. He was found not guilty by reason of insanity in 1977 and was released after two months in a psychiatric institution.

Harrington was ordered Monday to stand trial on two counts of first-degree murder and two felony firearms counts in the shooting deaths of his second wife, Wanda, and their son Brian in their Detroit duplex. His statement to Kirk was read aloud Monday at a preliminary hearing in 36th District Court.

Harrington's comments to Kirk renewed questions about the 1977 case and why Harrington was not sent to prison then.

Donald Cutler, a Southfield attorney, was Harrington's defense attorney in 1977. Cutler said Monday that two psychiatrists who testified at a hearing after the first killings agreed after examining Harrington that he was not criminally responsible. The law at the time, Cutler said, required then-Recorder's Court Judge Susan Borman to find Harrington not guilty by reason of insanity.

In court Monday, Kirk testified that Harrington told him he had recently run out of medications that eased his severe depression.

"I take Desyrel and Loxapine. It keeps me from hearing voices and helps me sleep. I've been out of the Loxapine for a week," Kirk said Harrington told him.

Harrington had been fired in April from Hercules Drawn Steel in Livonia after six years of employment. Kirk said Harrington told him: "I was told I got fired because everyone was scared to work with me. They said I had problems." Harrington, 53, a former Detroit Police Department detective and Vietnam veteran, said he had not slept the four nights before the shootings. He told Kirk he decided to kill his wife and son the night of Oct. 14, walked across the street and borrowed a gun from a man named "D."

"D" did not ask why Harrington wanted the gun, and Harrington did not offer the reason. Police have been unable to locate "D."

Harrington did not shoot his family that night, however. The following morning, he told Kirk, "everything seemed all right, but then in my head I just couldn't handle any more." He and his wife had not argued, he said. "It's just everything was going around inside my head. The welfare cut my check, I've been thinking about how I was going to take care of my family, I'm behind in the rent, and I didn't want to see them outdoors."

After his older son, Paul Jr., left for school about 9 a.m. Oct. 15, Harrington walked back into his rented duplex at 1444 W. Grand Blvd. According to Kirk, Harrington said his wife Wanda, 45, was asleep on the couch when he shot her in the left temple. He then shot his son, Brian, who was playing in the dining room, and carried him to the couch. Brian was shot three times in the head.

Harrington then called 911. He told police the gun would be on the dining room table, and he would be on the porch. Police found both, along with Wanda and Brian on opposite ends of the couch, their feet touching.

Defense attorney W. Frederick Moore of Detroit said Monday that the issue in the case "is not about what Harrington did, but about his frame of mind." Both Moore and Wayne County Assistant Prosecutor Ralph Elizondo expect Harrington's case to center on psychiatric testimony.

Little is known about Harrington. He served in Vietnam and joined the Detroit Police force in 1972. He was undergoing psychiatric treatment in 1975 when he killed his first wife, Becky, 28, and daughters Pamela, 9, and Cassandra, 4, with his police service revolver. The couple had recently separated.

In court Monday, Harrington said little, rubbing his eyes as Elizondo read descriptions of his wife's and son's autopsies.

Harrington, who is being held without bond in the Wayne County Jail, has only one relative in Michigan, a cousin. No family members appeared in court on his behalf. Several members of his wife's family attended the hearing but declined to be interviewed.


                     












Slayings called act of kindness
Ex-cop talks about killing family
October 19, 1999
BY SUZETTE HACKNEY
FREE PRESS STAFF WRITER

Paul Harrington had recently lost his job, was behind in rent and was starting to feel the financial pressure of supporting a wife and two children with no income.

So Harrington, a former Detroit policeman, thought it better to kill his wife and 3-year-old son than to see them homeless.

That, Detroit homicide detectives say, is what Harrington told them in a confession.

He told them he borrowed a gun from a friend Thursday, the night before the shooting, and killed Wanda Harrington and 3-year-old Brian early Friday morning. Afterward, he called 911.

When uniformed officers arrived at the home on West Grand Boulevard, Harrington, 53, told them he had killed his family.

"He said he couldn't support them so he had to kill them," said Sgt. Felix Kirk of the Detroit Police Department homicide unit. "He was under pressure trying to take care of his family. He said he didn't want to see them in the street."

Detectives said Harrington told them his last job was at a steel company in Livonia. Harrington was arraigned Saturday in 36th District Court on two counts of first-degree murder. He is being held without bond in the Wayne County Jail.

In 1975, Harrington faced three murder charges -- for the deaths of his wife and their two children in December. Harrington shot Becky, 28, and their daughters, Pamela, 9, and Cassandra, 4. He was fired from the police force after being charged with the triple homicide. In 1977, Recorder's Court Judge Susan Borman found Harrington not guilty by reason of insanity and ordered him committed for psychiatric treatment. Borman could not be reached for comment Monday.

Two months after his treatment began, Harrington was released from the program.

Harrington, a Vietnam veteran with a history of psychological problems, told homicide detectives this week he was under the care of a therapist and had been without some medication for about a week.

A Wayne County assistant prosecutor says last week's slayings were cold-blooded, calling for first-degree-murder charges. "Based on the information that was provided to me by the police department, I felt that was an appropriate charge," said Ralph Elizondo.

Monday, October 11, 1999

Sheriff William Hackel - Charged w/ CSC - Macomb SD







Also See:

[Sheriff] William Hackel - Masonic Temple Head of Security - Registered sex offender
August 26, 2013
[Sheriff] William Hackel - Denied new trial
September 19, 2007
[Sheriff] William Hackel - Registered sex offender - Released from prison
April 24, 2005
[Sheriff] William Hackel - Appeal
June 6, 2000
Sheriff William Hackel - Sentenced
May 15, 2000
Sheriff William Hackel - Trial: Convicted
April 17, 2000









In October 1999, Macomb County Sheriff William Hackel was investigated for raping an acquaintance during a Michigan law enforcement convention. Sheriff Hackel maintained that the sex was consensual.
In November 1999, Sheriff William Hackel was charged with rape, after he failed a polygraph exam.
During his trial in April 2000, Sheriff Hackel falsely maintained that the sex had been consensual. The jury convicted Hackel of rape.
In May 2000, Sheriff Hackel was sentenced to at least 3 years in prison for the October 1999 rape. He served 5 years and was released in 2005.
In June 2000, Sheriff Hackel filed an appeal on his rape conviction...He was still falsely claiming that the sex had been consensual. Hackel's appeal was denied.


 In 2007, the Detroit US Federal Court turned down Sheriff Hackel's request for a new trial on his rape conviction. Hackel was still maintaining that the sex had been consensual.






Sheriff William Hackel has been throwing the words "consensual sex" around for years. In 1991, when male jail inmates broke into the female inmate section of the jail, the male inmates did not rape the women: "There's no question that they had sex," Hackel said, "It was consensual".













Sheriff prosecuted after failing lie detector test
The Argus Press
Owosso Michigan
Mon., May 8, 2000

Mount Pleasant, Mich. [AP] - Former Macomb County Sheriff William Hackel failed a lie detector test two weeks before he was charged with raping a 25-year-old woman at a sheriff's convention.

The FBI polygraph exam showed Hackel failed two key questions: "Did you force [the victim] to have sex with you on Oct. 11th?" and "Did [the victim] ever indicate to you that she wanted you to stop having sex with her?"

Hackel answered no to both questions, according to the Detroit News, which obtained results of the test with a Freedom of Information Act Request.

"It is the opinion of the examiner that the recorded responses ... are indicative of deception," lie detector examiner Samuel J. Ruffino wrote in his report. Hackel was given the hour-long test at the FBI headquarters in Detroit on Nov. 2, 1999.

Hackel, 58, was convicted April 27 by an Isabella County jury of two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct.

A message was left early Monday seeking comment from Hackel lawyer James Howarth.

Polygraph test results are inadmissible as evidence in court, but prosecutors use them when credibility is a key factor, said Steven Kaplan, an assistant Macomb County prosecutor with 14 years experience.

"It's an important tool in a case where it's one-on-one," Kaplain said. "In cases where the evident is not strong, prosecutors will use polygraphs to determine whether they will charge. It's a tool for the prosecutor in determining the validity of the charges.

Hackel, who was sheriff for 23 years, faces up to 15 years in prison when he is sentenced May 15.























Sheriff prosecuted for rape after lie detector failure
Ludington Daily News
Monday, May 8, 2000

Mount Pleasant, Mich. [AP] - Former Macomb County Sheriff William Hackel failed a lie detector test two weeks before he was charged with raping a 25-year-old woman at a sheriff's convention.

The FBI polygraph exam showed Hackel failed two key questions: "Did you force [the victim] to have sex with you on Oct. 11th?" and "Did [the victim] ever indicate to you that she wanted you to stop having sex with her?"

Hackel answered no to both questions, according to the Detroit News, which obtained results of the test with a Freedom of Information Act Request.

"It is the opinion of the examiner that the recorded responses ... are indicative of deception," lie detector examiner Samuel J. Ruffino wrote in his report. Hackel was given the hour-long test at the FBI headquarters in Detroit on Nov. 2, 1999.

Hackel, 58, was convicted April 27 by an Isabella County jury of two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct.

A message was left early Monday seeking comment from Hackel lawyer James Howarth.

Polygraph test results are inadmissible as evidence in court, but prosecutors use them when credibility is a key factor, said Steven Kaplan, an assistant Macomb County prosecutor with 14 years experience.

"It's an important tool in a case where it's one-on-one," Kaplain said. "In cases where the evident is not strong, prosecutors will use polygraphs to determine whether they will charge. It's a tool for the prosecutor in determining the validity of the charges."
 














Hackel pleads not guilty
CM LIFE
January 01, 2000

http://media.www.cmlife.com/media/storage/paper906/news/2000/01/10/News/Hackel.Pleads.Not.Guilty-2479189.shtml

Macomb County Sheriff William Hackel pled not guilty to two counts of third degree criminal sexual conduct Dec. 17 at the Isabella County Circuit Court.

He is scheduled to appear for a definite final pretrial date at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 1, where settlement may be considered and a trial date set, according to court reports.

Hackel, 57, remains sheriff for Macomb County, though he faces felony charges that could result in 15 years in prison.

The charges stem from an investigation conducted by the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police from a complaint made on Oct. 11.

The complaint was filed by a woman who alleges she was assaulted in her hotel room at the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort, 1600 Soaring Eagle Blvd.

According to court reports, "Hackel orally penetrated (the alleged victim) by using force or coercion to accomplish sexual intercourse."

He was required to submit to mandatory HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases tests.The incident allegedly occurred while Hackel was attending the Michigan Sheriffs' Association fall conference in October.

Hackel, who has been Macomb's sheriff for 23 years, was released on a $10,000 surety or 10 percent bond.
















STAY PUT OR RESIGN?
OTHERS ANSWER FOR HACKEL SEX CHARGES DIVIDE MACOMB OFFICIALS
November 19, 1999
Detroit Free Press
As rape charges threaten to limit Macomb County Sheriff William Hackel's effectiveness in a way political rivals never could, opinion was divided Thursday over whether the county's top cop should step down. "All we know at this point are bare-boned allegations," said Macomb County Prosecutor Carl Marlinga, a friend and political ally of the six-term Democratic sheriff. "There should be some grace period to come to a decision ...














Macomb sheriff accused of CSC
CM Life
November 19, 1999

http://media.www.cmlife.com/media/storage/paper906/news/1999/11/19/News/Macomb.Sheriff.Accused.Of.Csc-2479534.shtml

Macomb County Sheriff William Hackel, who was arraigned Wednesday for allegedly sexually assaulting a woman, will face a preliminary examination set for Nov. 23.Hackel, 57, was charged with two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct, which requires that he submit to a mandatory HIV/AIDS.

The charges stem from an investigation conducted by the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police from a complaint made on Oct. 11, tribal police said.

Hackel could not be reached at press time for comment. The Isabella County Prosecutor's Office stated in a written release that the complaint was filed by a woman who alleges she was sexually assaulted in her hotel room at the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort, 1600 Soaring Eagle Blvd.

In reports filed at the Isabella County Building, Hackel "orally penetrated (the alleged victim) by using force to accomplish sexual intercourse."The incident occurred while he was attending the Michigan Sheriffs' Association fall conference last month.

Hackel, who has been Macomb's sheriff for 23 years, was released on a $10,000, surety or 10 percent bond.

He is married with a son.

The Associated Press contributed to this article.


















 

 

 

 

 
Sheriff Accused of assaulting woman
Moscow-Pullman Daily News
Thursday, November 18, 1999



Mount Pleasant, Mich - A sheriff has been charged with raping a woman while attending the states's Sheriff's Association conference last month.

William Hackel, a 23-year veteran sheriff of Macomb County, was arraigned Wednesday on two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct. Each offense carries a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison.

The alleged assault occurred at the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort in Mount Pleasant, about 60 miles north of Lansing. The investigation was conducted by the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police.

The Oct. 11 complaint was filed by a woman who alleges she was sexually assaulted in her hotel room at the resort, the Isabella County Prosecutor's Office said in a written statement.

Investigators interviewed more than two dozen people during the five-week investigation. The woman reported the alleged attack shortly after she said it occurred, prosecutor Larry Burdick said.

More than 100 representatives from 60 of Michigan's 83 counties attended the three-day conference to discuss law enforcement standards.

Hackel's wife also was at the conference.

Hackel was not at the sheriff's department office Wednesday evening. His home telephone number is not published. There was no answer at the office of Hackel's attorney, James Howarth.

Howarth had said earlier that Hackel did not intend to step down and urged people not to form a hasty opinion.

Howarth told the Detroit Free Press this week: "This could end his career."

Hackel, 57, who is serving his sixth four-year term as sheriff of the Detroit-area county, was released on $10,000 bond. A preliminary hearing was scheduled for Tuesday.















Woman says sheriff raped her in hotel
-The veteran lawman is charged on two counts -
The Vindicator
Thursday, November 18, 1999

Mount Pleasant, Mich [AP] - Mount Pleasant, Mich - A sheriff has been charged with raping a woman while attending the states's Sheriff's Association conference last month.

William Hackel, a 23-year veteran sheriff of Macomb County, was arraigned Wednesday on two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct. Each offense carries a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison.

The alleged assault occurred at the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort in Mount Pleasant, about 60 miles north of Lansing. The investigation was conducted by the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police.

Statement: The Oct. 11 complaint was filed by a woman who alleges she was sexually assaulted in her hotel room at the resort, the Isabella County Prosecutor's Office said in a written statement.

Investigators interviewed more than two dozen people during the five-week investigation. The woman reported the alleged attack shortly after she said it occurred, prosecutor Larry Burdick said.

More than 100 representatives from 60 of Michigan's 83 counties attended the three-day conference to discuss law enforcement standards. Hackel's wife also was at the conference.

Hackel was not at the sheriff's department office Wednesday evening. His home telephone number is not published. There was no answer at the office of Hackel's attorney, James Howarth.















Michigan sheriff accused of rape
Rome News-Tribune
Thursday, November 18, 1999

Mount Pleasant, Mich [AP] - Mount Pleasant, Mich - A sheriff has been charged with raping a woman while attending the states's Sheriff's Association conference last month.

William Hackel, a 23-year veteran sheriff of Macomb County, was arraigned Wednesday on two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct. Each offense carries a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison.

The alleged assault occurred at the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort in Mount Pleasant, about 60 miles north of Lansing. The investigation was conducted by the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police.














Macomb sheriff accused of assault
The Argus Press
Owosso Michigan
Thurs. Nov. 18, 1999
Mount Pleasant, Mich. [AP] - The Macomb County sheriff has been charged with raping a woman in a hotel while he was attending the Michigan Sheriff's Association fall conference last month.

William Hackel, 57, was arraigned Wednesday on two counts of third-degree criminal sexual conduct. Each offense carries a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison.

"Conviction would almost certainly mandate some length of prison term," Prosecutor Larry Burduck told The Detroit News.

The charges stem from an investigation conducted by the Saginaw Chippewa Tribal Police from a complaint made on Oct. 11, tribal police said. Tribal police conducted the investigation because Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort in Mount Pleasant where the attack allegedly occurred is on tribal property.

Hackel surrendered to authorities Wednesday afternoon.

Hackel, who has been the sheriff for 23 years, was released on a $10,000 bond. A preliminary examination is scheduled for Tuesday.

The complaint was filed by a woman who alleges she was sexually assaulted in her hotel room at the Soaring Eagle Casino and Resort, the Isabella County Prosecutor's Office said in a written statement.

Investigators interviewed more than two dozen people during the five-week investigation. The woman reported the alleged attack shortly after she said it occured, Burdick said.

Hackel was not immediately questioned by police.

More than 100 representatives from 60 of Michigan's 83 counties attended the three-day event to discuss law enforcement standards and hear speakers. Hackel's wife also was at the conference.

Macomb County Prosecutor Carl Marlinga, a close friend and political ally of Hackel, called Wednesday "the saddest day of my political career." But he said he believes the judicial system will work to find the truth.

"I'm perfectly torn in half on this," he told The Macomb Daily of Mount Clemens. "Bill Hackel is my friend, but I also don't believe police or prosecutors would bring forward a charge unless it's being brought in good faith."

Hackel was not at the sheriff's department office Wednesday evening. His home telephone number is not published. There was no answer at the office of Hackel's attorney, James Howarth.

Howarth had said earlier that Hackel did not intend to step down and urged people not to form a hasty opinion.

But he told the Detroit Free Press on Thursday: "This could end his career."

Hackel, who has a son who works for the sheriff deparmtnet, was elected sheriff in 1976.










Prisoners break in to have sex
Lewiston Tribune
Saturday, April 13, 1991

Mount Clemens, Mich - Eight prisoners broke into the women's section of the Macomb County Jail and had sex with eight female inmates, authorities said.

The incident was discovered when the male inmates scrambled back to make bed check Tuesday night, jail administrator Donald Amboyer said. The male inmates were awaiting transfer to the Phoenix Correctional Facility at Plymouth. They broke into a closet, descending a plumbing shaft to a closet one floor below and broke knobs off a closet there to get into the women's section.

They stayed in the woman's quarters about a half hour, Sheriff William H. Hackel said. "There's no question that they had sex," Hackel said. "It was consensual."