Thursday, May 24, 2001

Senator David Jaye - Ousted from Senate - Macomb County



In April 2001, Senator David Jaye was arrested for domestic violence. The Michigan Senate began an investigation for his two domestic violence assault; his three drunken driving convictions; probation violations; allegations that he verbally abused Senate staff members and that he kept naked photos on his Senate issued laptop computer.

On May 24, 2001 Senator David Jaye was ousted from the Michigan Senate. It was the first time in Michigan history that a senator had been ousted.

A special election was held to fill Jaye's senate seat and Jaye ran in the election despite being removed from office.



Also See:

Senator David Jaye - Sentenced for probation violation [August 2001]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2001/08/senator-david-jaye-sentenced-probation.html

Senator David Jaye - Mistreatment of Senate staff
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2001/05/senator-david-jaye-mistreatment-of.html

Senator David Jaye - Arrested for assaulting fiancee [April 12, 2001]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2001/04/senator-david-jaye-macomb-county.html

Senator David Jaye - Domestic violence charge dropped [May 14, 2001]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2001/05/senator-david-jaye-charges-dropped.html

Senator David Jaye - domestic assault [November 19, 2000]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2000/11/senator-david-jaye-domestic-assault.html

Senator David Jaye - Arrested for driving on restricted driver's license / probation violation
[November 19, 2000]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2000/11/senator-david-jaye-probation-violation.html

Senator David Jaye - Stripped of Senate Assignments [June 2000]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2000/06/senator-david-jaye-senate-reprimand.html

Senator David Jaye - Sentenced for March 05, 2000 drunk driving charge [July 2000]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2000/07/senator-david-jaye-sentenced-macomb.html

Senator David Jaye - Drunk driving charge [March 2000]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2000/03/senator-david-jaye-macomb-county.html

Senator David Jaye - drunk driving charge [1993]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/1993/02/senator-david-jaye-macomb-county.html

Senator David Jaye - drunk driving charge [1984]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/1984/01/senator-david-jaye-macomb-county.html








David Jaye's Wacky, Racisty 1990s Cable Access Show Finds New Life On YouTube
Jeff Wattrick
Deadline Detroit
February 15th, 2013, 8:22 AM
http://www.deadlinedetroit.com/articles/3763/david_jaye_s_fun_racisty_1990s_cable_access_show_finds_new_life_on_youtube



The 1990s were a glorious time. It was an era when a man could rock a gay porn moustache without being mocked. He could even have a drinking problem, drop his gun in a state capitol, and star in racist cable access programming all while serving as an elected official.

Of course, we are speaking of David Jaye. He was Washington Township's sexiest elected official ever. Before getting kicked out of the state Senate in 2001 for (allegedly) domestic violence, drunk driving, and storing porn on his state-issued computer, Jaye wasn't just a humble lawmaker. He was a cable access star.

What camera wouldn't love Jaye's creepy smile, his bad combover that leaves you wondering if he's wearing a hair piece, and his fun demand that Detroit Mayor Dennis Archer submit to a drug test? You know, because Archer was (maybe still is!) one of those blacks! In Detroit! Then there was the time Jaye "joked" about Native American casino operators trying to scalp him. Classic.

You can relive so many of these great memories in this newly-posted YouTube compilation of David Jaye's greatest cable access moments. Good times all around.









Judge grants Jaye permission to leave
December 21, 2001
Detroit Free Press

David Jaye plans to end a whirlwind year -- in which he had his ear smashed in jail after an arrest, was booted from the state Senate and broke up with his fiancee -- by leaving the country to teach American government in South Korea. Jaye plans to leave Saturday, said his lawyer, Robert Huth. Although he is on probation, which is scheduled to end in July, Jaye's move was made legal Thursday after 41A District Judge Douglas Shepherd...











Upset Votes In Primaries For Mayors
New York Times
Published: September 13, 2001

While turnout on Tuesday for mayoral primaries in three major cities was unsurprisingly low on a day when the nation's attention was turned to terrorist attacks, the results were anything but predictable.

, shocked Gil Hill, the president of the Detroit City Council, beating him by more than 15 percentage points in a nonpartisan primary. The men will square off in November to fill the vacancy being left by Mayor Dennis Archer, who had announced that he would not seek a third term.


The Cincinnati race may have been the most watched, coming in the wake of racial tensions and street disturbances there in April. Mayor Luken, a 50-year-old Democratic incumbent, was facing voters for the first time in a nonpartisan primary under a new local governing system that would consolidate more power in the mayor's office. He finished second, with 39 percent of the vote, to Courtis Fuller, a 44-year-old newsman who stepped out from behind the anchor desk three months ago. Mr. Fuller received 54 percent of the vote.

They will meet on Nov. 6 in the first direct election for mayor since the 1920's.

''A lot of people in the city have the feeling that something has got to change,'' Heather Gadker, a campaign spokeswoman for Mr. Fuller, said in analyzing the results. ''They just kept hearing the same things from Charlie'' Luken.

In Minneapolis, R. T. Rybak, a business consultant, pegged his victory in the 22-candidate race on a ''Humphrey-meets-Ventura'' campaigning philosophy.

Mr. Rybak said his effort was a mix of the solid local political organizing of former Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey, a former mayor of Minneapolis, and the grass-roots insurgency of Gov. Jesse Ventura, a former professional wrestler.

''I see the people of Minneapolis being ready to turn the page after four years of relatively passive leadership,'' Mr. Rybak said yesterday.

Ms. Sayles Belton, both the first woman and the first black to be mayor of Minneapolis, is wrapping up her second four-year term. She outspent Mr. Rybak in the nonpartisan primary by more than four to one, according to spending reports.

In Detroit, Mr. Kilpatrick shocked local political observers not so much with his victory but with the size of his margin. As the campaign wound down, polls showed him running close with Mr. Hill.

Mr. Kilpatrick took 51 percent to Mr. Hill's 34 percent, in a race that at one juncture saw Mr. Hill with a lead of more than 20 points in a field of more than 21 candidates.

Mr. Kilpatrick is the son of Representative Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick and is a political protégé of Ed McNamara, the Wayne County executive.

As is usually the case in primaries, turnout was low in all three races, and the balloting was quickly eclipsed by news of the terrorist disasters. Only in Minneapolis did more than one quarter of registered voters -- 27 percent -- vote. Turnout was 20 percent in Detroit and 15 percent in Cincinnati.

''We think we would have been much higher because we had a well-organized get-out-the vote campaign,'' Mr. Rybak said. ''But we shut it down by midmorning. All the candidates just shut everything down.''

Television coverage, which normally would have followed voting throughout the day in each city, was overwhelmed by the national news.

Also in Michigan, former State Senator David Jaye failed in his bid to regain his seat. Mr. Jaye, an outspoken Republican from suburban Macomb County, was expelled by his colleagues earlier this year for misconduct, including drunken driving and accusations that he physically abused his fiancée. He finished a distant third in his primary.

In New York, Gov. George E. Pataki ordered primary elections across the state postponed because of the attacks.

Photos: Mayor Charles Luken finished second in Cincinnati's primary. (Associated Press); Mayor Sharon Sayles Belton finished second in Minneapolis. (Associated Press)

                   











Michigan Election
2 advance for Detroit Mayor; Jaye trails
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
September 12, 2001
Associated Press

Detroit - ...Elsewhere in the state, Rep. Allan Sanborn was leading expelled Sen. David Jaye in early returns to fill Mr. Jaye's old seat.


With 21 percent of districts reporting, Mr. Sanborn had 2,151 votes or 48 percent and Jaye had 986 votes, or 22 percent...

Mr. Jaye was elected to the seat in a 1997 special election to replace the late Republican Sen. Doug Carl and re-elected in 1998. His fiancee defended him during a Senate investigation that led to his expulsion and denied several times that he ever hit her.

She publicly borke off their engagemnt two weeks ago...
 

                 












Elections take place in surreal conditions
The Vindicator
September 12, 2001
Boston [AP] - ....Michigan Sen. David Jaye, who was expelled from the state Senate in May for behavior that included three drunken driving convictions and accusations that he assaulted his finacee, suffered an overwhelming defeat in the Republican primary...
 
 
 


                 









Sanborn defeats Jaye in primary
The Michigan Daily
September 12, 2001

 
 
                 












Michigan Election
Ex-Sen. Jaye loses bid to regain post
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
Associate Press
September 12, 2001

Mount Clemens, Mich. - State Rep. Alan Sanborn won the Republican primary in the 12th Senate District yesterday, ending expelled Sen. David Jaye's bid to return to the Senate in this years's election.


With 87 percent of precincts reporting, Mr. Sanborn had 10,531 votes, or 48 percent, former Rep. Sue Rocca of Sterling Heights had 4,975 votes, or 23 percent, and Mr. Jaye had 4,183 votes, or 19 percent.

"The special interests won this election," said Mr. Jaye who conceded.

Mr. Sanborn said he out-worked Mr. Jaye.

"I think he gout out of touch with his district," Mr. Sanborn said. "They didn't to be bogged down by controversy anymore."

Thirteen candidates ran in the GOP primary for Michigan's 12th Senate District that takes in northern and western Macomb County.

Mr. Jaye was expelled from the Senate in May on a 33-2 vote for behavior that included three drunken driving convictions and accusations - but no charges - that he had assaulted his fiancee.

Mr. Jaye was elected to the seat in a 1997 special election to replace the late Republican Sen. Doug Carl and re-elected in 1998. His fiancee defended him during the Senate investigation that led to his expulsion and denied several times that he ever hit her.

She publicly broke off their engagement two weeks ago.

Among Democrats, with 86 percent of the precints reporting, Carl Territo of Macomb led with 24 percent of the vote and Robert Denison of Shelby Township had 18 percent. Al Martin of Sterling Heights had 11 percent and Jim Ayres III of macomb had 10 percent.

The winners of the Republican and Democratic primaries will meet each other in the Nov. 6 general election. The winner will hold the seat until Dec. 31, 2002.

In the race for Detroit mayor, State House Minority Leader Kwame Kilpatrick and City Council President Gil Hill were the top two finishers and will square off in the general election to succeed Mayor Dennis Archer.

With 75 percent of precincts reporting, Mr. Kilpatrick had 46,126 votes or 51 percent, and Mr. Hill received 30,970 votes, or 34 percent.

Nicholas Hood III, a city councilman and pastor, was next with 8 percent. Retired auto executive Bill Brooks had 2 percent. The other 17 candidates each had less than 2 percent.

Mr. Hill, 69, is a former homicide chief who appeared in the comedy Beverly Hills Cop. Mr. Kilpatrick, 31, is the son of U.S. Rep. Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick.

The election, which included 97 City Council hopefuls, went on as planned despite word of the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington.

But officials counted ballots at an alternate location after Coleman A. Young Municipal Building was closed because of heightened security.

The attacks prompted about one-third of the 300 workers counting absentee ballots at Cobo Hall to abandon their work, said Sean Smith, information technology manager for the city's Elections Department.

The remaining workers, who began counting the absentee ballots at 7 a.m. had not finished when the polls closed at 8 p.m.
 










22 candidates, one issue: Jaye
Ex-Senator humble and apologetic as he tries for a comeback
September 6, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

Face to face with a voter who said she couldn't support him this time around, former state Sen. David Jaye stood humbled and offered an apology. "I'm a man, not a priest. I'm a politician, not a saint," he told the woman in front of the Sterling Heights Senior Activity Center. "I apologize about the drinking. I've been dry for a year and a half. My fiancee, she left me." On a recent...

                     










Michigan Today
September 1, 2001
Detroit Free Press

MACOMB COUNTY - Jaye says he's not only non-senator running Former state senator David Jaye said Friday he will remove the word "senator" from his campaign literature and accused the Macomb County prosecutor of dirty politics and last-minute trickery. Jaye said other political candidates should be required to change their literature, specifically one of his opponents for the state Senate, Alan Sanborn. A Sanborn campaign flyer reads...

                   









Ousted lawmaker gets a warning
Jaye's use of Senator title called illegal
August 31, 2001
Detroit Free Press

By reading the campaign literature that calls him Sen. Dave Jaye and his Web site titled Michigan State Senator Dave Jaye Information Center, one might never know that Jaye isn't a senator at all. To call himself one in such correspondence is illegal, says William Harding of the Macomb County Prosecutor's Office. If the ousted lawmaker-turned-candidate for his old seat doesn't cease with the senatorial references, he will be ticketed for violating...











David Jaye's fiancee pregnant, won't marry ousted senator
FreeRepulic.com
Posted on 08/28/2001 08:55:49 PDT
By Hillary's Lovely Legs

Sonia Kloss, apparently pregnant and feeling abandoned by her fiancee, said Monday she has broken off her engagement with ex- senator David Jaye because she claims Jaye has had affairs with several other women.


Kloss, 36, said she no longer plans to marry Jaye in the spring and will not support him in the upcoming Sept. 11 special election. She accuses Jaye of sexual relations with 10 women since they've been engaged, and she said he's been unfaithful to her numerous times.

"I told him I don't want to have anything to do with him. I'm done with him," Kloss said in a telephone interview from her Fort Myers, Fla., home."

As far as I'm concerned, the engagement is off. I think he's using me. I can't keep putting up with his infidelities. Once he gets his Senate seat back, he'll dump me like a hot potato."

Jaye did not personally return repeated telephone calls for comment.

However, a spokesperson for Jaye, whose running in the Sept. 11 special election was prompted by his Senate expulsion, said the Washington Township Republican was the one who ended the relationship.

Jaye spokeswoman Susan Tabar said that Kloss has falsely accused Jaye of infidelities several times in the past. Jaye, 43, believes Kloss is falsely claiming to be pregnant as a sympathy ploy, Tabar added."He has made several attempts to mitigate the situation and it hasn't worked. Dave has ended the relationship. The damage is done," Tabar said.

The Washington Township Republican said as recently as Aug. 3 that he loved Kloss and would marry her this spring.

But Tabar said Kloss' heavy drinking and her extreme jealousy has taken its toll on the relationship."

She's been rambling on for two years. Whenever something goes wrong, she retaliates with another facade," said Tabar, a member of the political group known as Women Supporting Jaye.

On Monday, Kloss said she is about 2 1/2 months pregnant with Jaye's child and suffering daily from morning sickness. But she said the ex-senator's only interest is winning the September primary and Nov. 6 general election.

"I'm 2 1/2 months pregnant, I'm puking my guts out, and his words to me this morning were, 'Are you sure I'm the father?'" Kloss said. "He doesn't like kids. He doesn't want kids. But he's pro-life. Figure that out."

Kloss' accusations come at a time when a new poll shows Jaye trailing in third place in the Republican primary field, with just 15 percent of the vote. The EPIC/MRA poll indicated that only 10 percent of Republican women in the 12th Senate District will vote for him.

When allegations arose that Jaye had assaulted Kloss in Bay County in November and at her Florida home in April, Kloss said she was standing by her man. She denied Jaye had ever hit her and urged the Senate not to expel him because of the alleged assaults.After the expulsion, Kloss testified on Jaye's behalf at his August probation hearing. The former lawmaker had never been charged with either assault but he was found guilty of violating his probation in the Florida incident.When the probation hearing concluded on Aug. 3, Kloss campaigned for Jaye later that day. But she returned to Florida about a day later to be with her two sons and hasn't returned to Michigan since.

Jaye and Kloss announced their engagement in February but Kloss has been telling people that they're engaged since at least September 1999.

Their relationship apparently unraveled last week when Jaye put out a press release announcing that his ex-wife, Sharon Jaye, was endorsing his candidacy. The ex-senator and Kloss had quarreled in the past about Jaye's continued friendship with his former wife.

Kloss admitted Monday that she is upset with Jaye's relationship with his former wife.

Sharon Jaye, however, said she remains friends with her ex-husband.

"I really don't want to lower myself to her (Kloss') level. I am not romantic with David," she said.

A Shelby Township resident, Sharon Jaye filed for divorce in 1998 and the divorce became final in 1999. She said Kloss has placed harassing phone calls to her -- sometimes in the middle of the night -- for nearly two years.Kloss, who is not a registered voter in Michigan, said she will not support Jaye's bid to win back his Senate seat but will instead back one of Jaye's opponents in the 22-person field. She would not say who will gain her endorsement.

"David was not serious about marrying me," she said. "He was only interested in politics."









Ousted State Senator on Comeback Trail
August 27, 2001
Stateline.org
By Tim Skubick, Special to Stateline.org

David Jaye was the first senator in Michigan's 162 year history to be expelled from office.


Undaunted, the maverick ultra-conservative Republican now seeks to rewrite the history books again by becoming the first ousted lawmaker to recapture his old seat.

This unusual political comeback tale is being played out in one of Michigan's most volatile and nationally-known hot beds of political activity -- Macomb County, a suburb just north of Detroit. Birthplace of the Reagan Democrats, quirky Macomb is poised to send back to Lansing a legislator who was soundly drummed out of office for offenses he says he never committed. His fellow senators didn't believe him.

Jaye was accused, but never charged nor convicted, of beating his fiancee on two separate occasions.

In one of the cases, Sonia Kloss first told police that Jaye hit her. Than she recanted. But by then the state Senate was up in arms. On top of the domestic violence allegations, Jaye had several previous drunk driving convictions. At one point, he'd served his constituents from a county jail cell.

His colleagues branded Jaye an embarrassment to the institution and one senator concluded he couldn't face his own wife and daughter as long as Jaye was around. Jaye has always been a thorn in the side of lawmakers whom he accuses of going along to get along. When they wanted to spend on pork barrel projects, he would single them out by name and blast their alleged frivolous spending habits. If Governor John Engler ordered Jaye to jump, he stood still. By his own admission he was not the most popular guy around, but he parlayed that into one election win after another as the voters back home loved him.

Removed from office this spring, Jaye is now pursuing his old seat claiming he was unfairly booted out, and he's giving the voters a chance to send Lansing a message and send him back.

To counteract the negative publicity over the abuse charges, Jaye has formed a Women for Jaye committee. Those female supporters say they don't believe he is a woman hater or beater. He'll need to convince other women that they are right.

The primary for the senate seat is September 11 with the run-off slated for November. Jaye's chances for winning increased when the field was finalized. When the dust settled, 13 Republican hopefuls were in the hunt.

Some theorize that the anti-Jaye vote will be divided among the other 12 while Jaye holds onto his base support and rides merrily back into office with less than 30% of the vote. He's won like that before but denies that he had anything to do with quietly recruiting the raft of candidates in the field.

The state's organized political establishment from the Chamber of Commerce to multi-client lobbyists has marshaled its money and manpower behind Rep. Alan Sanborn (R-Macomb County).

The more they pile on, the more Jaye plays the martyr seeking the sympathy vote. Jaye has beaten Sanborn before and as the mud flies, he's confident he can do it again.

The anti-Jaye theme is fairly simple: reelect this guy and nobody in the senate will give him the time of day, let alone any legislation that might benefit Macomb County. Jaye counters that he is an independent voice in tune with independent minded voters in the mercurial county.

Jaye's supporters chime in with attacks on Sanborn, saying he lied about bringing home $5 million for new roads while voting to spend $3 million on an airport in Kalamazoo about 200 miles from Macomb county.

There's already been one casualty in the fray. Senate Republican Leader Dan DeGrow, who almost single handily jump-started the expulsion proceedings against Jaye, has been deserted by his own party in a bid to become Michigan's next attorney general.

Lt. Governor Dick Posthumus, the odds-on favorite to win the GOP nomination for governor next year, told DeGrow this week that he was yanking his previous support for DeGrow's A.G. bid. Posthumus needs the conservative base in Macomb County to have any chance of replacing his pal and incumbent Gov. Engler.Since DeGrow had alienated voters there, Posthumus broke with him, citing the David Jaye flap as part of the reason.

David Jaye couldn't be happier.











Jaye vows comeback; some warn of toss-up
The Argus-Press
Owosso, Michigan
Malcolm Johnson
Associated Press
August 27, 2001

Lansing, Mich. [AP] - As David Jaye campaigns to become the once and future state senator from Macomb County, he makes one thing perfectly clear: If re-elected to his old Senate seat, he's not going to change his aggressive, populist style.


But that style and Jaye's expulsion from the Senate threaten Republicans' hold on the seat if he wins the GOP nomination, say some political observers.

"I think the Republicans would have trouble in the general election" if Jaye wins the Sept. 11 special primary election, said Tom Shields, a Republican consultant who heads Marketing Resource Group in Lansing.

A Jaye victory "makes this seat a toss-up," Shields said. "It's a potential quaqmire for the Republicans."

The traditionally Republican district extends from Fraser and Sterling Heights to Romeo and parts of Memphis in nothern Macomb County. Jaye was elected to the seat in a 1997 special election to replace the late Republican Sen. Doug Carl and was re-elected in 1998.

Republicans may sidestep the potential mess if some of the other leading GOP contenders in the field of 13 beat Jaye.

An Aug. 21-23 EPIC-MRA / Detroit Free Press poll indicates Jaye is in a close race with state Rep. Alan Sanborn of Richmond and Macomb County Commissioner Sue Rocca of Sterling Heights.

Sanborn had 25 percent, Rocca 20 percent and Jaye 15 percent in the survey of 500 voters in the district. The poll has a margin of error of 5 percentage points either way, so it's unclear if Sanborn actually has the lead. Twenty-two percent of the voters said they were undecided.

Jaye seems confident he'll win both the primary and general election. He said he has every intention of resuming his anti-tax, small-government campaign to cut state spending, reverse affirmative action policies and champion gun rights if re-elected.

"I'm the taxpayer's best friend," he boasted.

But Sanborn has gathered a flurry of endorsements from groups such as the Michigan Chamber of Commerce, Small Business Association of Michigan, and the Macomb County Farm Bureau.

"We're gaining momentum," Sanborn said. "Clearly the voters want to see a change...They want a senator they can be proud of."

Jaye, from Macomb County's Washington Township, has dominated the Senate's attention for months. In May, he became the first senator to be expelled from office.

The Senate voted 33-2 for expulsion based on his record of three drunken driving convictions, accusations - but no charges - he assaulted his fiancee and allegations he verbally abused Senate staff.

Earlier this month, a district court judge fined Jaye $500 after ruling that he violated his probation by assaulting his girlfriend and failing to follow driving restrictions.

But Jaye remained eligible to run in the special election to fill his former seat. As a well-known politician with a strong core of conservative supporters, Jaye stands to do well in a crowded field that threatens to divide the anti-Jaye vite, political experts said.

"That's the best scenario for Jaye," said Bill Ballenger, editor of Inside Michigan Politics. Party leaders did everything they could to keep the field narrow, but it didn't work, he said.

Democratic leaders are salivating at the idea they could win the seat if Jaye wins the GOP nomination. Nine Democrats have filed for the seat. After the Sept. 11 special primaries, the winner will be chosen in a Nov. 6 special election.

"I think there is enough anti-Jaye sentiment among sane and rational people that it would be possible to take that seat," said Joyce Lalonde, Democratic chairwoman of the 10th Congressional District, which includes much of the 12th state Senate District.

"David Jaye has been a political embarrassment to the Republican Party and a political embarassment in general," she said.

Political experts say top threats to Jaye in the primary election are Sanborn, Rocca, former Re. Alvin H. Kukuk of Macomb Township and Steve Thomas of Macomb, who ran unsuccessfully for Macomb County sheriff last year.

Thomas got 5 percent in the EPIC-MRA / Detroit Free Press poll; Kukuk got 4 percent. All other Republicans in the race got 2 percent or less.

Others in the GOP ballot are John Bryan of Shelby Township, Joseph P. Chirco of Macomb, Tracy DeNise of Utica, Michael Dorman of Shelby Township, Ahmad Sam Esman of Utica, Judy Landino of Sterling Heights, Robert Murphy of Sterling Heights, and John M. Peterson of Shelby Township.

The nine Democrats who filed to run are Jim Ayres III of Macomb, Robert Denison of Shelby Township, Curtis L. Hargrove of Macomb Township, Al Martin of Sterling Heights, Trevor C. Smith of Shelby Township, Lola Telmos of Romeo, Carl Territo of Shelby Township, William E. Tremper of Macomb Township and Jerry M. Witt of Shelby Township.
 
 












Jaye states claim on old seat
Ex-senator says personal life, work were separate
July 27, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

The answering machine at former state Sen. David Jaye's Washington Township home greets callers by telling them to leave a message for "Sen. Dave Jaye." Never mind that two months ago, he became the first Michigan senator ever expelled by colleagues. Jaye says he still feels every bit a representative of the people. "I receive 30 to 50 calls a day from constituents who need help fighting big government," Jaye said. On...










The Jaye story
June 4, 2001
By John Gizzi

Making news far beyond the borders of the Water Wonderland, Michigan state senators last week for the first time in history expelled one of their colleagues.


Following weeks of hearings and an emotional debate on the senate floor, the Republican-controlled state senate formally expelled GOP State Sen. David Jaye (lifetime Michigan Conservative Union rating: 90%), who had previously been charged with physical abuse toward his fiancee and in keeping nude photographs of her on his Senate-issued laptop computer. (See HUMAN EVENTS, April 30, page 18.) The 43-year-old Macomb County lawmaker was driven out of his seat by a vote of 33 to 2, seven more than needed for expulsion.

"We have been trying to get David to straighten himself out for a long time," one Republican legislator who voted for expulsion wrote me after the vote, noting that Jaye has also had three drunken driving convictions. "If he were in a private corporation, he would have been fired long ago."

But the curtain has by no means fallen on the controversy-riddled Jaye saga. Under state law, a special election will soon be held, and the ousted Jaye is permitted to run for his former seat. If returned to office, according to the law, he must be seated and cannot be expelled on the same charges as before.

In 12 years as a county commissioner, state representative and senator, the Republican who styles himself a "junkyard dog" has never lost an election. His formula for success in his blue-collar county, Michigan pundits note, is a crowded primary in which the opposition is split and Jaye brings out enough of his hard-core following to win, rallying his troops with spirited opposition to quotas and affirmative action.

Already, State Rep. Alan Sanborn, Who succeeded Jaye in the state House, has signaled he will seek the Republican senate nod. In addition, it is widely thought that Sal and Sue Rocca, a husband-and-wife team who have alternated the offices of state representative and county commissioner, will also get into the GOP race.

"Right now, I'm leaning toward running again," Jaye told HUMAN EVENTS, adding that the one stumbling block to his comeback bid is "the $80,000 in legal fees I've been saddled with." He noted that "I have not been tried or convicted" of the charges of striking his fiancee and that "convicted felons have served in the legislature without any talk of expulsion."

As for support, the embattled Republican pointed out that "the Executive Committee of the County Republican Party here has passed a resolution in support of me, and so have the Macomb County Taxpayers Association and the local gun-owners group. We had over 1,200 yard signs in the last campaign and people have been calling me regularly saying they'll put up my signs again. And when I went to try to collect unemployment [which was eventually denied], the two people in front of me in the line stopped, hugged me, and said they would support me in a special election."











Pages of opinion
Martyr in the making?
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
May 29, 2001
David Jaye is by most accounts, a mean drunk and an otherwise thoroughly obnoxious individual, but that doesn't justify expelling him from the Michigan Senate for misconduct. The people who elected him should have been allowed to decide his fate, and the risk now is that he will become a martyr who will be right back in the legislature via a special election.


The extent to which Mr. Jaye became persona non grata among his Senate colleagues was reflected in the last week's 33-2 vote to kick him out. Twenty-two of his fellow Republicans voted with 11 Democrats in the majority, so it can't be said the expulsion was the result of any partisan vendetta.

Rather, Senate Republican leaders seemed to be sick and tired of dealing with a long-standing pattern of misconduct by Mr. Jaye - three convictions for drunken driving, an arrest in Florida for allegedly beating up his fiancee and lying about it, and a record of abuse toward staff members.

Such disreputable behavior, plus the revelation that he kept nude photos of his fiancee on a Senate computer, mark Mr. Jaye as the kind of guy few would want to be associated with. But the fact remains that he was duly elected to the Senate and the voters of his Macomb County district should have had a say on whether he stayed.

Senate leaders had a couple of alternatives in dealing with Mr. Jaye. They could have censured him, taking away all his Senate privileges save his right to vote. Or they could have found and financed a candidate to defeat him in the next primary election. Instead, goaded by Mr. Jaye's in-you-face defiance and absolute refusal to get professional help or even admit he had done anything wrong, they chose the easier path of expulsion.

Now Mr. Jaye is eligible to be a candidate in a special election that must be called to replace him. Judging by comments from supporters in the suburban district, his populist brand of religion and anti-tax, pro-gun, and anti-abortion fervor is popular. He could be back in office soon, once again sticking his thumb in the eye of the Senate establishment.

The risk for a political body in expelling a troublesome colleague - Mr. Jaye is the first in Michigan Senate history - is that it could encourage similar action in the future by a vindictive political majority.

And in Mr. Jaye's case, the tactic may accomplish just the opposite of the desired goal.
 
 










Expelled state sentor's probation in question
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
May 29, 2001

Mount Clemens, Mich. - David Jaye, expelled from the State Senate on Thursday, faces a probation hearing that could carry political ramifications, Macomb County Prosecutor Carl Marlinga said.


A June 7 hearing is set in Macomb County on whether Mr. Jaye's probation for a 2000 drunken driving conviction should be revoked. Prosecutors are expected to try to show Mr. Jaye violated his driving restrictions.

The Washington Township Republican could be ordered to spend another 10 1/2 months in jail.

Mr. Jaye said Saturday he might run during a special election to fill the rest of his term. A date for the vote has not been set.
 










National Briefing
Midwest: Michigan: State Senator Expelled
The New York Times
Published: May 25, 2001
By JOHN W. FOUNTAIN (NYT)

David Jaye, a conservative Republican, became the first Michigan senator to be expelled from office. A 33-to-2 vote to expel him by the Republican-controlled Senate came after hearings into accusations that Mr. Jaye struck his fiancée and verbally abused staff members. Mr. Jaye called the expulsion a ''railroad job.'' John W. Fountain (NYT)









Senate boots Jaye in a historic vote
Member with a checkered past is kicked out, 33-2
May 25, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

A united Senate expelled David Jaye on Thursday, branding the Macomb County veteran lawmaker a bully whose many personal and legal troubles made him unfit for a job he fought doggedly to keep. The 33-2 vote ended weeks of crackling controversy and hearings over whether the Republican iconoclast was an incorrigible misfit or a political target who championed unpopular causes but made mistakes in his personal life. A day earlier, a special committee investigating charges against Jaye...










Tri-State Summary
Michigan Senate votes to expel member
The Bryan Times
May 25, 2001

Lansing, Mich. [AP] - The state Senate voted Thursday to expel Sen. David Jaye, capping a turbulant six weeks that began with accusations Jaye had struck his fiancee and rended with his insistence he was being railroaded for his unpopular political views. At least 26 votes in the 38-member Senate were needed to force out Jaye, who became the first Michigan senator ever expelled. The resolution to remove him passed 33-2. Jaye, a noisy, boastful, arch-conservative gadfly who has likened himself to a "junkyard dog," turned down requests from several senators to resign before the vote.
 










Michigan Senator forced out
Wilmington Morning Star
May 25, 2001
Kathy Barks Hoffman
Associated Press

Lansing, Mich. - The Michigan Senate on Thursday expelled one of its memebers for the first time, ousting a Republican who had been accused of verbally abusing staff members and hitting his fiancee.


Sen. David Jaye was forced out on a 33-2 vote, seven more votes than were needed. The conservative senator, who likened himself to a "junkyard dog," said he was being rail-roaded for his political views.

"I'm going into bankruptcy over trumped-up charges," Sen. Jaye said during his fight on the Senate floor to save his job. "Why? Because I've upset the political bosses and the special interests."

Sen. Jaye, 43, has been under investigation by a Senate committee for three drunken driving convictions, allegations that he hit fiancee Sonia Kloss and "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct," including verbally abusing staff memebers.
 











Michigan Senate votes Jaye out
Defiant arch -conservative blames action on 'trumped-up charges'
The Toldeo Blade
Associated Press
May 25, 2001

Lansing - The state Senate voted yesterday to expel Sen. David Jaye, capping a turbulent six weeks that began with accusations he had struck his fiancee and ended with his insistance he was being railroaded for his unpopular political views.

At least 26 votes in the 38-member Senate were needed to force out Mr. Jaye who became the first Michigan senator expelled. The resolution to remove him passed 33-2.

Mr. Jaye, a boastful arch-conservative gadfly who has likened himself to a "junkyard dog," turned down requests from several senators to resign before the vote. At one point, lawyers for Mr. Jaye and Senate Majority Leander Dan DeGrow discussed letting Mr. Jaye resign in the fall, but no deal was struck.

Mr. Jaye pleaded with senators before the vote to censure him and let him keep his seat, but Mr. DeGrow was able to get 11 Democrats to join 22 of the Senate's 23 Republicans in voting to expel Mr. Jaye. Democratic Sen. Don Koivisto of Ironwood and Mr. Jaye were the only ones to oppose the resolution.

Mr. Jaye, 43, had been under investigation by a special Senate committee for three drunken driving convictions, allegations he hit his financee, Sonia Kloss, and "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct," including verbally abusing staff members and having six photoss of his topless financee on his Senate-issued laptop computer.

The senator, a Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township, admitted he made mistakes but said he was pushed out because he had clashed with Mr. DeGrow [R- Port Huron].

"I'm going into bankruptcy over trumped-up charges," Mr. Jaye said during his fight on the Senate floor to save his job. "Why? Because I've upset the political bosses and the special interests."

Mr. Jaye said after the vote that he may run again for the Senate. Governor Engler is expected to call a special election to fill Mr. Jaye's seat. Mr. Jaye said he's thinking of filing a suit over his expulsion but admitted his legal bills may make that impossible.


Bill McMaster, head of an Oakland County taxpayers' group and a Jaye supporter, said he hopes Mr. Jaye runs again. "The battle has begun with the birth of a martyr in Senator Jaye," Mr. McMaster said. "He may not be gone for long."

Mr. Koivisto said Mr. Jaye didn't deserve to be expelled because the allegations that Mr. Jaye had been in "a violent physical altercation" with his financee were never proved.

"We are saying you are guilty even if you never were even charged," Mr. Koivisto said. He called for censuring Mr. Jaye and taking away perks of the office.

But, other senators said Mr. Jaye's behavior had been too extreme and gone on too long to allow him to stay.

Although Mr. Jaye was never charged in Florida after being arrested on April 12 in a dispute with Ms. Kloss, some senators said they didn't believe the pair's denials that he didn't strike her.

Other said they were upset with documents from Senate staff members saying Mr. Jaye had sworn at them or been verbally abusive.
 









Jaye Failed to convince fellow senators he had come clean
May 25, 2001
The Argus Press
Owosso MI
Kathy Barks Hoffman
Associated Press

Lansing, Mich. [AP] - Sen. David Jaye might still be sitting in the Senate next week if he's convinced his fellow senators he's come clean.


Several of the 33 senators who voted Thursday to expel the Macomb County Republican said the outcome might have been different if they hadn't thought he was lying about striking his fiancee, Sonia Kloss.

They pointed to the police testimony saying Kloss had bruises on her face after an April 12 dispute with Jaye outside her home in Fort Myers, Fla.

They brought up the eyewitness account of an 18-year-old clerk at a Bay County gas station who took a day off school to tell a Senate investigating committee he saw Jaye strike Kloss as the two were leaving the station's mini-mart last November.

They didn't buy Kloss' comments that Jaye had never struck her, or Jaye's argument that because Florida authorities decided not to bring formal charges against him and he'd never been charged in six months for the Bay County incident, he should be left off the hook.

For Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow and many others, the evidence added up to one thing: Jaye had hit his fiancee.

"Once it was clear he did, it was over," DeGrow said after the vote. "He continues to deny it. He'll probably always deny it. But it [his denial] isn't true."

DeGrow, R- Port Huron, said the outcome may have been different if Jaye had walked into his office the week after his April 12 Florida arrest, admitted he'd hit Kloss twice and asked for help straigtening out his life.

Instead, Jaye insisted to his fellow Senate Republicans during an April 17 meeting that he had not struck Kloss.

During the Senate investigation, his lawyers showed an interview they'd taped with Kloss in which she said she had been hit in the face by a garment bag the two had been tussling over in Florida, not by Jaye.

They also showed a tape from the service station's surveillance system on which Jaye can be seen propelling Kloss out of the men's bathroom in the station's mini-mart, but not striking or kicking her.

Jaye insisted those were enough to prove his innocence, and that his other transgressions - three drunk driving convictions, verbal abuse of staff members and having six photos of his topless fiancess on his Senate-issued laptop computer didn't deserve expulsion.

But his fellow senators weren't looking for proof that Jaye hadn't erred. They wanted him to admit he'd done something wrong and get professional help.

"Things that used to be acceptable in harassment are not acceptable anymore," said Sen. Joanne Emmons, R-Big Rapids. "When I became convinced he hit her and lied, that crossed the line for me."

DeGrow has walked a delicate line of his own with Jaye ever since the brash, in-you-face state representative won a Senate special election in 1997. He kept private his letters admonishing Jaye and restored the committee assignments Jaye lost when he had to serve jail time last summer for his third drunk driving conviction.

But while Jaye's political stances didn't differ that much from his predecessor; the late Doug Carl, he didn't seem to fit very well into the smaller; more dignified world of the 38-member Senate.

Where he was just one colorful character among several in the 100-member House, Jaye's often caustic behavior toward Senate staff and other senators wasn't as easily overlooked in the Capitol's south wing.

That became even more truer as Jaye, under the spotlight of a six-member, bipartisan committee investigating his behavior, accused DeGrow of trying to shove him out of office in a political witch hunt.

When Jaye began insisting the 18-year-old clerk was a liar, most senators had heard enough.

"It drove home the drastic reality of what the pattern here was," said Senate Democratic Leader John Cherry of Clio. Instead of coming clean, he said, Jaye lied. Instead of taking responsibility for his actions, he tried to blame others.

Still, no one looked triumphant as the first vote to expel a senator in Michigan history passed 33-2.

"This was not a happy vote," said Livonia Republican Thaddeus McCotter, who headed the investigating committee. "This was not a vote somebody won."
 
 










Jaye to face his fate today
Full senate is to vote
May 24, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

A committee's 5-1 vote Wednesday to expel state Sen. David Jaye for misconduct sets up a climactic and historic vote today on whether to boot the controversial Macomb County Republican. With almost no debate, the special Senate committee approved a revised resolution that accuses Jaye of tarnishing the Senate by drinking and driving, abusing staff, misusing his Senate computer and twice assaulting his fiancee. The vote ended three weeks of hearings and public consternation...












Senate expected to take up Jaye expulsion resolution
Ludington Daily News
May 24, 2001

Lansing, Mich. [AP] - After weeks of accusations that he had acted in ways unbecoming to a lawmaker, state Sen David jaye will soon learn if he will keep or lose his seat.


The 38-member Senate was expected to vote Thursday afternoon on a resolution that recommends Jaye be expelled. The resolution passed a special Senate investigating committee Wednesday on a 5-1 biparisan vote.

Jaye called the move to expel him from the seat he's held since 1997 a rush to justice, saying he didn't see how senators not on the committee will be able to review three weeks of testimony before Thursday's vote.

"This is a railroad job," said Jaye, a Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township. "It didn't matter what we said."

The committee delayed its vote Wednesday afternoon as talks over a scenario that would spare Jaye expulsion and possibly lead to his resignation went on between Jaye's lawyers and Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow, R-Port Huron.

No agreement had been reached by early Wednesday evening, and it was unclear if one would be reached before the expulsion resolution came to a vote in the full Senate.

Until now, Jaye has refused to resign and has threatened to sue if the full Senate votes to expel him. He didn't directly answer a question Wednesday about whether he is considering resigning, but didn't sound ready to give up his fight just yet.

"I'm not a quitter," he said after the committee's vote.

Jaye, 43, has been under investigation by the committee for three drunken driving convictions, allegations he hit his fiancee Sonia Kloss and "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct," including verbally abusing staff members and having six photos of his topless fiancee on his Senate-issued laptop computer.
 










Full Michigan Senate expected to take up Jaye expulsion resolution
The Argus-Press
Owosso, Michigan
Kathy Barks Hoffman
Associated Press
May 24, 2001

Lansing, Mich. [AP] - After weeks of accusations that he has acted in ways unbecoming to a lawmaker, state Sen. David Jaye will soon learn if he will keep or lose his seat.


The 38-member Senate was expected to vote Thursday afternoon on a resolution that recommends Jaye be expelled. The resolution passed a special Senate Investigating committee Wednesday on a 5-1 bipartisan vote.

Jaye called the move to expel him from the seat he's held since 1997 a rush to justice, saying he didn't see how senators not on the committee will be able to review three weeks of testimony before Thursday's vote.

"This is a railroad job," said Jaye, a Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township. "It didn't matter what we said."

The committee delayed its vote Wednesday afternoon as talks over a scenario that would spare Jaye expulsion and possibly lead to his resignation went on between Jaye's lawyers and Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow, R-Port Huron.

No agreement had been reached by early Wednesday evening, and it was unclear if one would be reached becore the expulsion resolution came to a vote in the full Senate.

Until now, Jaye has refused to resign and has threatened to sue if the full Senate votes to expel him. He didn't directly answer a question Wednesday about whether he is considering resigning but didn't sound ready to give up his fight just yet.

"I'm not a quitter," he said after the committee's vote.

Jaye, 43, has been under investigation by the committee for three drunken driving convictions, allegations that he hit fiancee Sonia Kloss and "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct," including verbally abusing staff members and having six photos of his topless fiancee on his Senate-issued laptop computer.

The committee voted on an alternative resolution to the one they had been considering for the past three weeks. The new resolution, authored by Senate Democratic Leader John Cherry, still calls for Jaye's expulsion.

But Cherry, of Clio, said it better reflects what the committee has learned about Jaye during its investigation. The committee also could have recommended that Jaye be censured or reprimanded or have no action taken against him. Twenty-six votes are needed to expel him.

Jaye criticized the new resolution, saying it still accused him of being involved April 12 in what it called "a violent physical altercation" with his fiancee outside her home in Fort Myers, Fla. Both Jaye and Kloss deny he hit her. Florida authorities last week declined to press formal domestic battery charges against Jaye.

Those voting to recommend expulsion were Republican Sens. Thaddeus McCotter of Livonia, Phillip Hoffman of Horton and Walter North of St. Ignace, as well as Democratic Sens. Alma Wheeler Smith of Salem Township and Cherry.

The lone dissenter was Sen. Don Koivisto, D-Ironwood, who said he plans to argue Thursday on the Senate floor that Jaye doesn't deserve to be expelled. He support censuring Jaye and taking away many of his perks of office, including access to his officer computers and Senate-issued laptop computer.

But committee Chairman McCotter said censure would amount to only a slap on the wrist for Jaye, "He has not upheld his oath of office," said McCotter, who said he plans to vote Thursday to expel Jaye.

Smith said she voted for the resolution because she saw evidence that Jaye had consistently mistreated staff members working for Secretary of Senate Carol Viventi and committed other acts listed in the resolution.

"If we didn't act here today, we would be sending a message that we as senators are above the law," she said. "That is certainly not a message that I want to send my constituents>"

Republicans and Democrats in the Senate met separately on the matter Wednesday morning, but Jaye was not allowed to present his case to either side. His lawyers will not be able to speak Thursday on the Senate floor.
 
 









Tape surfaces, casting doubt on Jaye case
He calls shop's video exoneration
May 23, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

A surveillance videotape that shows Sen. David Jaye pushing but not hitting his fiancee at a Bay County gas station last November jolted a Senate special hearing Tuesday and cast doubt on the case to expel Jaye. But one leading senator said the tape doesn't disprove charges that Jaye struck Sonia Kloss after she left a men's restroom at the store off I-75. The unexpected tape was a bombshell in the expulsion hearings, which continued into Tuesday evening. With...










News Analysis: Jaye case shrouded in haze
By: Louie Meizlish
Michigan Daily News Editor
Posted: 5/21/01

For the last few weeks, a special committee of the Michigan Senate has been attempting to determine whether one of its members, David Jaye, is fit to serve.


Jaye, a twice-convicted drunk driver who has been arrested for altercations in which he allegedly struck his fiancee (those charges were recently dropped), is accused of verbally abusing Senate staff, keeping pornographic pictures on his office computer and using Senate computer staff to load personal software onto his computer.

Soon after his arrest in Florida last month for striking his fiancé, several Republican senators, led by Majority Leader Dan DeGrow of Port Huron, began talking about expelling him.

A motion to do just that was introduced and DeGrow created a six-member committee to examine Jaye’s "qualifications" to serve and recommend a form of reprimand for Jaye, such as an expulsion or censure. The final decision rests with the full Senate. An expulsion requires a 2/3 majority, or 26 of the 38 senators. A censure, or a formal condemnation of Jaye, only requires a majority.

The Jaye affair comes down to two things: politics and interpretation.

First, politics. Jaye (R-Washington Twp.) is seen as an embarrassment to the Republican Party for his behavior and his outspoken views on various issues, which are perceived as conservative even for a GOP legislator.

In addition, Jaye is a liability to the Michigan GOP. The Republicans now hold a 23-15 majority in the Senate. If 2002 is a bad year politically, that majority will shrink (as Al Gore took the state last November) to an uncomfortable margin and control of the Senate may hinge on which party wins Jaye’s Macomb County district.

So the GOP wants a candidate who has the best chance of defeating a Democrat. Evidence shows that Jaye is not that person. He won his last election in 1998 with 60 percent of the vote, but all it takes is one-sixth of the people who would normally vote for him to be revolted by his behavior and all of a sudden the 2002 race becomes close. At that point, Republicans are in trouble.

What the GOP most likely wants to do is force him out, run somebody (without his type of baggage) in the special election to succeed him (see footnote at bottom) who has a better shot of winning in the general election. Although Michigan law does not prevent Jaye from running in the special election to succeed himself, the GOP would probably throw all of its efforts into recruiting somebody who can defeat him in a primary if he were to. Or they could embarrass him so badly he would decide not to run. That person would be in a good position to be reelected next November, when control of his seat matters. For the same reasons, the Democrats would like to keep Jaye in his seat through 2002.

Second, interpretation. The state Constitution is especially vague about expulsions. More vague than defining what a high crime and misdemeanor is (harken back to the Clinton impeachment trial). Basically it says either house of the Legislature determines when it is proper to expel. It reads, "Each house shall be the sole judge of the qualifications, elections and returns of its members, and may, with the concurrence of two-thirds of all the members elected thereto and serving therein, expel a member."

The only thing that is clear is that a felony is a good reason to expel. It was also rather clear-cut in 1998 when then- Sen. Henry Stallings (D-Detroit) resigned before he was expelled for having a state employee work in his private art gallery.

But Jaye hasn’t committed a felony.

Everyone agrees the Senate can expel one of its own for any reason, but the question remains: when is it good public policy to do that?

Jaye is accused of screaming and swearing at Senate staff and using staff to upload personal software on his computer, but those accusations are not going to do him in, and there’s a good chance he’s not the only senator who has done such things. The same goes for his having a topless photo of his fiancé on his office computer.

The other question the senators will have to answer is whether the crimes Jaye has been convicted and/or accused of driving while intoxicated and domestic assault warrant his removal.

One observer is particularly leery of expelling him for those reasons.

Wayne State University Constitutional Law Prof. Robert Sedler said the standard should, with few exceptions, be a felony.

"If a person has been convicted of a felony, the person has had a fair trial in accordance with all of the constitutional safeguards and has been found guilty by a jury of his peers by a reasonable doubt," he said.

Sedler added an exception should be made if, say, there was a preponderance of evidence showing a legislator had taken a bribe but couldn"t be convicted because of reasons such as a technicality or a prosecutor not wanting to indict.

But others say Jaye has done enough damage already.

Sen. Thaddeus McCotter (R-Livonia), chairman of the committee investigating Jaye, said times have changed. Thirty years ago, he said, striking a female or getting caught driving drunk were not considered serious matters. Now they are.

"What people are saying in the papers are it should be a felony," McCotter said. "But that’s for somebody who does one thing. You could, under that interpretation have a serial sexual harasser on the floor of the Senate. That’s not a criminal penalty and you could do nothing about it."

Sen. Leon Stille (R-Spring Lake), who introduced the bill to expel Jaye, said one who serves in the Senate should be someone "that doesn’t break the law repeatedly. One that doesn’t flaunt the law and basically says "catch me if you can." One that doesn’t lie repeatedly when he is caught and then try to use every method under the sun to avoid conviction or to get off scott-free and then laugh about it. One that doesn’t make a spectacle of himself and one that doesn’t abuse other people in any way, shape, or form, whether it be verbal or physical."

Another member of the committee, Sen. Alma Wheeler Smith (D-Salem Twp.), said senators also have to take into account how Jaye’s status as a member of the Senate reflects on the body as a whole.

"I think you need to be dealing with some fairly serious offenses that not only affect the way the senator performs his job or her job but reflects negatively on the ability of the Senate or the Legislature as a whole to perform with credibility," she said.

Sedler, the law professor, dismissed this argument, saying, "the theory is that his behavior has been so outrageous, et cetera, that it has brought the Senate into disrepute. What that means is that the senators, and especially the Republicans, are embarrassed by his conduct and they’re going to be tainted by it."

The committee investigating Jaye is expected to issue a recommendation soon with the possibility that the matter will also come to a vote in the full Senate next week.

What weight the senators give to their political leanings and their interpretation of the rules is impossible to determine, as is the final outcome. It’s like betting on Michigan weather.

Footnote: Michigan law does not prevent Jaye from running in the special election to succeed himself. The GOP would probably throw all of its efforts into recruiting somebody who can defeat him in a primary. Or they could embarrass him so badly he would decide not to run.










A poor example
Senators should vote Jaye out
The Michigan Daily
May 21, 2001
Our government and, in fact our society derives heavily from the premise that an individual needs to surrender some of his rights / powers and bestow them onto an appointed/elected few. For instance, someone living in a city implicitly agrees to grant only law enforcement officials of that city the power to arrest and charge a person with a crime. In the case of government, citizens forego their individual voice in law making and entrust it to an elected representative.


There is an implicit trust that those elected will conduct themselves honorably and fulfill the requirements of their jobs to the best of their abilities. When elected officials fail to meet these demands, it is the responsibility of their fellow lawmakers to speak up and remove the offending individuals from office.

David Jaye was entrusted with the task of representing Macomb county in the Michigan Senate in 1997. In spite of his two drunk-driving convictions, Jaye won the election with 2,000 votes, defeating Democratic challenger Becky Higbie. Since becoming a senator, Jaye has been convicted of a third drunk-driving charge.

His other alleged acts of misconduct include verbal abuse and profanity directed at his staff and more recently, domestic violence directed against his fiancee'. Jaye spent a night in a Florida jail after police responded to a 911 call about an alleged dispute with his fiancee'.

Jaye, who was active in the anti-affirmative action lawsuits against the University of Michigan, is currently facing the possibility of disciplinary action from his colleagues. Article IV, Section 16 of the Michigan Constitution states that "Each house shall be the sole judge of the qualifications, elections and returns of its members, and may with the occurrence of two-thirds of all members elected thereto and serving therein, expel a member."

In light of his recent run-in with the law, there is currently a six-member panel assigned the task of determining what disciplinary action to take. This senate committee could recommend that Jaye merely be reprimanded or it could expel him from office.

Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow has predicted that Jaye will likely be ousted. Jaye will have a chance to defend himself to the committee and has expressed his intent to sue to get his job back if forced to leave it. If the committee decides to expel him from office, Jaye will be the first senator to be expelled in Macomb County history.

Jaye is detrimental to lawmaking in Michigan and should be expelled. His presence in government despite his continued misconduct demonstrates a double standard for law-breakers: If you break the law you will be penalized, but if your job is to make those laws, your penalties will be lighter. The implication is that lawmakers don't have to obey the laws like everyone else.

Jaye's presence in the Senate undermines the integrity of the institution and he should be removed immediately. Michigan citizens deserve to be represented by lawmakers who respect the laws of the land.

If the Senate committee decides not to expel him, the residents of Macomb County should take action themselves and start a petition to have him recalled. His effectiveness as a member of the Michigan senate is irreparably damaged by his history of misconduct and it is unlikely that he can accomplish anymore worthwhile deeds in his post.
 
 










In Our Opinion
Jaye should be honorable, for once, and resign his seat
The Argus-Press
May 21, 2001
It's our belief- and not just as journalists - that where there's smoke therre is at least the possibility of fire which should be investigated quickly, in order to avoid devastation.


In what we find to be the pathetic case of State Senator David Jaye of Macomb County, there has been - metaphorically speaking an out-of-control blaze raging within this man for several years.

This is not merely our assessment or judgment of the man, if you will, it's well-documentd.

Three drunk driving convictions [that's convictions, not arrests on suspcion and the third conviction is a felony], a charge of violating probation in last year's DUI [for which he served only an insulting 35 days in jail], charges of domestic battery, allegations of being verbally abusive with employees working for the secretary of the senate and with having several photos [inappropriate to say the least] of his topless fiancee' on his laptop computer on the senate floor: available for all who approached him to see.

All of this, mind you, while a member of the Michigan Senate.

If Jaye, 43, a Republican, were in the private sector would he not have been a mere unsavory memory long ago?

We're all human beings, with frailties and crosses to bear. We have a greater tolerance in this day and age for the shortcomings of others. In many case, including Jaye's our first step is usually to try and get a person the proper help they require, professional or otherwise.

Various senators, of both parties, have called Jaye's behavior, "a pattern that is very troubling and has brought disgrace to the institution." What do you think?

Jaye is under formal investigation by a special Senate committee for all of the above allegations, as well as "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct." The hearings resume Tuesday in efforts to determine what it will recommend to the entire Senate, that Jaye be censured, reprimanded or expelled.

We find it interesting that Jaye's fiancee' will not testify before the Senate committee. We find it interesting [and typical] that Jaye's lawyer calls the charges and accusations against the Senator, "piddly at best." And we find it interesting that Jaye, himself, has been privately lobbying other senators to let them talk with his fiancee' about "what really happened" in alleged Bay County and Florida assaults on the woman. That would be the same fiancee' who will not go before the committee.

Jaye is extremely experienced at spin-doctoring. And, obviously at talking his way out of sticky situations.

He is expected to produce "stacks of files" from Senate staff members and others [character witnesses] who say "very nice things about Senator Jaye," according to his lawyers.

We say it's irrelevant at this point. Maybe Jesse james was a nice guy when he wasn't robbing banks and shooting innocent people. OK, maybe a bad example, but you get the idea.

Jaye, in our view, is one of those people who uses his position entrusted to him by the voters - only for his greater good.

He's not the first politician, nor will he be the last, to succumb to the trappings and temptations which go along with a position elevated to by the people.

But obviously, he feels his position grants him immunity from not only disgusting and embarassing behavior, but most significant of all, illegal behavior. His swaggering demeanor gives off an aura that he is, somehow, above the law.

The Senate right now is said to be privately debating what standards they would put in place before someone is expelled from office, especialy in view of the fact that Florida authorities will not charge Jaye with domestic battery for an April altercation with his fiancee' that touched off an investigation.

Our recommendation, retroactively speaking, would be "how about two drunken driving arrests ago?" We encourage the Senate to make a decision, posthaste, and get on with more important state business at hand.
-alh

 
 
 
 









Officials query new Jaye case witnesses
Bay County incident draws further probe
May 17, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

The case to expel state Sen. David Jaye from office took another turn in Bay County on Wednesday with a renewed investigation into whether the Macomb County Republican assaulted his fiancee at a gas station last November. Bay County Prosecutor Joseph Sheeran said State Police are interviewing five new and previous witnesses to determine whether Jaye will be charged with misdemeanor assault. The Nov. 19 incident has become a focal point in hearings on whether to expel Jaye for repeated...














Jaye hearing takes break to give lawyers more time
Ludington Daily News
May 17, 2001
Lansing, Mich. [AP] - An investigation over whether Sen. David Jaye should be expelled from the Senate is taking a breather until Tuesday to give defense attorneys time to go over documents that surfaced this week.


The secretary of the Senate on Wednesday handed over filed to Jaye that she said contained numerous complaints about Jaye's mistreatment of members of her staff.

But Jaye's attorney said the records also could be used to provide positive testimony about the senator and to undermine arguments he should be expelled.

Jaye referred to the documents as "secret files" and accused Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow of withholding the records, having his phone calls monitored and copying files from his laptop computer without his knowledge.

"I never gave permission to the Senate computer department to keep a permanent record of my laptop files," Jaye said in a statement. "It's frightening to know that...state employees' private letters, Valentines's Day cards and private photos on state-owned property can be used against them."

Jaye, 43, is under investigation by a Senate committee for a series of drunken driving convictions, allegations that he hit his fiancee and "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct," including having six photos of his topless fiancee on his laptop computer.

The six-member, bipartisan committee is considering a resolution to expel Jaye, an action that would require 26 votes in the 38-member Senate. It also could recommend the Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township be censured or reprimanded.

A spokesman for DeGrow denied the Port Huron Republican had ever done anything wrong.

"I don't know where this charge of withholding evidence is coming from, because we have turned over everything that could possibly be related" to jaye, Aaron Keesler said.


 













Details delay senate inquiry into Jaye case
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
Associated Press
May 16, 2001

Lansing - The first day of testimony supporting Sen. David Jaye's contention that he shouldn't be expelled from the Michigan Senate ended with lawyers from both sides planning to review new documents.


Mr. Jaye's attorneys said the files appear to contain information that could bolster Mr. Jaye's argument that he did not verbally abuse Senate staff members and does not deserve to lose his job.

A resolution calling for the expulsion of the Republican from Macomb County cites his series of drunken driving convictions, allegations that he hit his fiancee, and what it terms "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct," including having six photos of his topless fiancee on his laptop computer.

The hearing is scheduled to begin again at noon today with testimony by Jaye supporters.
 
 













Charges dropped against lawmaker
Sen. David Jaye still faces legal problems in Michigan.
The Gainesville Sun
May 15, 2001
The Associated Press

Lansing, Mich. - Florida officials have decided not to charge state Sen. David Jaye in a domestic battery case.


The Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township spent April 12 in the Lee County Jail in Fort Myers after a dispute earlier in the day at the home of his fiancee there.

He was arrested on a misdemeanor charge of domestic battery, but on Monday the area's state attorney said no formal charges would be filed.

Jaye is facing possible expulsion from the Michigan Senate, in part because of reports he hit fiancee Sonia Kloss in Florida and in Michigan. She repeatedly has denied he hit her.

Jaye scheduled a 3 p.m. news conference in front of the Macomb County Circuit courthouse to discuss the case. A no-contact order that had been in place in Florida between Kloss and Jaye because of the domestic battery charge also was dropped.

"I am thrilled that my fiancee, Sonia, and I can now speak to and visit with each other, and I am free to take her children fishing again," Jaye said in a written statement.

Jaye attorney Philip Thomas said the decision not to formally charge Jaye in Florida undermines the Senate's case against him.

Florida prosecutors said they didn't feel they had a good chance of convicting Jaye.

But Jaye's legal problems could still be far from over.

A Michigan county judge agreed Monday to hear arguments on whether Jaye's probation on drunken driving charges should be revoked, in part on accounts that Jaye dragged Kloss out of a bathroom and struck her at a gas station in November.
 
















Poli-Bytes: A behind-the-scenes look at state and local politics
May 14, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

FARMINGTON HILLS - County leaders duck each other's jabs As if being scrutinized by nosy newspapers and inquisitive auditors weren't enough, Wayne County Executive Ed McNamara had to put up with jabs last Friday from his Oakland County counterpart, L. Brooks Patterson. "What I want to say to McNamara is, 'Did you have the same PR firm as David Jaye?' " Patterson quipped, referring to the embattled Macomb County...










Senate majority leader believes Jaye will lose job
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
May 14, 2001
Lansing - Sen. David Jaye, charged with beating up his girlfriend and facing a Senate probe of his fitness to hold office, probably will lose his job, Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow says.


A Senate vote to expel Mr. Jaye could come as early as this week, said Mr. DeGrow. He and Mr. Jaye are Republicans.

Asked if Mr. Jaye will be ousted, Mr. DeGrow said, "I think so."

"Others will have to decide on their own, but I think the last straw is that he hits women and lies about it," the Port Huron lawmaker said. "He has breached acceptable standards for a sitting senator."
 









Michigan senator condemns probe, cites 'Gestapo' tactics
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
Associated Press
May 13, 2001

Sterling Heights, Mich. - Embattled state Sen. David Jaye lambasted a six-member Senate panel investigating his conduct and said yesterday that a pair of his fellow Senate Republicans are using "KGB, Gestapo-style tactics in their investigation."


The panel is meeting in Lansing to determine whether Mr. jaye should be expelled from office. The Macomb County Republican is accused of breaking the law, verbally abusing Senate staff members, and violating Senate rules.

Mr. Jaye singled out Sen. Thaddeus McCotter [R - Livonia], the committee's chairman, and Majority Leader Dan DeGrow of Port Huron, who has recommended expulsion for Mr. Jaye. Mr. DeGrow is not on the panel. "Obviously these senators have a personal problem with me," Mr. Jaye said at a news conference. "This committeee will only allow witnesses to testify about negative claims against me."

Attorneys have wrapped up their case for Mr. Jaye's expulsion.

In Wednesday night testimony, Carol Viventi, secretary of the Senate, said she found about 10 pictures on Mr. Jaye's laptop computer where a woman was topless or scantily clad in public places with men. One of Mr. Jaye's attorneys identified the woman pictured as Mr. Jayee's fiancee, Sonia Kloss.

"It is an outrage that McCotter would even allow private files and private photographs as evidence into the committee record," Mr. Jaye said. "I bet just about every legislator has hard-core porn on their laptop."

Mr. Jaye said he doesn't know how the photographs got on his laptop.

A Macomb County official said Friday that county probation officials expect to ask a judge tomorrow that Mr. Jaye's probation for drunken driving be revoked, based on allegations of assaults against his fiancee. No hearing will be requested until after the Senate hearings conclude.

The bipartisan committee looking into Mr. Jaye's behavior is considering a resolution that cites Mr. Jaye's series of drunken-driving convictions, a pending domestic battery charge in Florida, and what it termed "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct."
 














Sexy photos cited in Jaye hearing
Senate staffers say computer display offensive to them
May 11, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

While helping Sen. David Jaye retrieve deer-hunting photos from his computer last November, staff member Cathy Stewart was shocked by unexpected photos that popped up on the screen. They were pictures of a bare-breasted woman. "I consider them to be offensive; she didn't have clothes on," Stewart said Thursday while appearing before a Senate committee that's considering expelling Jaye from office. "I didn't expect to...









Jay may mull lawsuit if ousted from Senate
May 11, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

State Sen. David Jaye, who sat stone-faced this week as witnesses testified about his boorish and sometimes illegal behavior, said Thursday evening that he may sue to keep his job if his Senate colleagues vote to oust him. Jaye said the benefits he derives from elective office, like salary and pension, could be considered property rights. As such, they cannot be removed without due process, he said. In an interview following the conclusion of the first three days of hearings on...









Witnesses say Jaye hit his fiancee
Kloss recants charge she was beaten in separate incident
May 10, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

In crucial testimony, three witnesses told a special Senate committee Wednesday that they saw Sen. David Jaye slap his fiancee during an altercation last November in the parking lot of a convenience store. Jaye, who faces expulsion for a list of misbehaviors, has repeatedly denied that he has ever hit Sonia Kloss. James Matthews, 18, a cashier at a convenience store off I-75 near Bay City, said Jaye hit Kloss with an open hand as he forcibly led her to the parking lot and their car...









Hearings underway over political future of State Senator David Jaye
Northern Michigan 9 &10 News
Posted: 5/10/2001
http://www.9and10news.com/category/story/?id=64442

(Lansing-AP) -- Hearings are under way in Lansing over the legislative future of state Senator David Jaye. Hearings began after the Macomb County Republican was charged in Florida with hitting his fiancee. He's already on probation for misdemeanor drunken driving. (Saginaw-AP) -- In Saginaw, firefighters are going door-to-door to rally public support for their jobs. Seven fire positions are among 59 full-time jobs on the chopping block as Saginaw pares its budget to overcome a projected deficit of one-point-eight (m) million dollars. (Benton Township-AP) -- People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is urging Whirlpool to do away with egg holders in its refrigerators. PETA says eggs are bad for people, and egg farms are bad for chickens. A spokesman for the Benton Township company says it offers what consumers want. (Lansing-AP) -- Drivers in construction zones should put down their cell phones, stop fiddling with their radios and stopping trying to eat and drive. State transportation director Greg Rosine spoke out today in Lansing, kicking off a campaign to make construction zones safer.










Defense shows tape as jaye expulsion hearings continue
Ludington Daily News
May 10, 2001
Malcolm Johnson
Associated Press
Lansing, Mich. [AP] - State Sen. David Jaye's fiancee said on a videotape that she and Jaye tussled over a garment bag and that Jaye did not hit her during an April incident in Florida.

The account came Wednesday, the second day of a hearing before a six-person, bipartisan Senate committee investigating whether Jaye should be expelled. If he is forced to leave, the Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township would be the first senator expelled in Michigan history. The hearing was to resume Thursday morning.

Jaye, 43, has said repeatedly he never struck Sonia Kloss and has offered to resign if found guilty of domestic battery charges in Florida.

Kloss said she and Jaye tussled April 12 over a garment bag outside her home in Forty Myers, Fla. According to the taped account, the bag struck her in the face when she pulled on it and he let go. She said she had been drinking heavily that day and said several times that she didn't recall details of the altercation.

"It was like a tussle, back and forth," she said. She said she had wanted Jaye to give back her keys, which she said she later found in her bag.

Asked several times on the tape if Jaye had struck or beaten her, she answerd, "No."

Jaye complained earlier this week that he hasn't been given enough time to prepare a defense. The Michigan chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union took the same stance Wednesday.

"He should be accorded a full and fair public hearing safeguarded by basic due process requirements," the organization said in a news release.

Although it takes no position on the charges against Jaye, it said it has "serious concerns" about the way the hearings are being run.

"We believe that the Senate should ensure that all basic due process requirements are afforded him, including adequare notice and time to prepare, and that it establish a high standard for expulsion for both Senator Jaye as well as any othe senator whose conduct merits review by his or her colleagues in the future," the statement said.

When it concludes its investigation, the Senate committee could recommend that Jaye be expelled, censured or reprimanded.
 
 
 










Barbs fly as Senate opens Jaye hearings
Panel Chair, lawyers spar
May 9, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

Senate hearings to expel embattled Sen. David Jaye had a fractious start Tuesday, veering between testimony from witnesses and sparring between Jaye's attorneys and the chairman of the committee considering Jaye's fate. As questions for early witnesses focused on whether Jaye, R-Washington Township, assaulted his fiancee, Sonia Kloss, at a Bay County gas station last November, tension filled the cavernous Senate hearing room. In other testimony, a police...











Fla. cops say Jaye choked his fiancee
2 officers' testimony caps testy day in Senate inquiry
May 9, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

Testimony from two Florida sheriff's officers that state Sen. David Jaye hit and choked his fiancee capped a long first day of hearings before a special Senate committee that is considering whether to expel the senator. Two Lee County, Fla., sheriff's officers said Tuesday that Sonia Kloss told them that Jaye hit her in the face during an argument at her Ft. Myers, Fla., home, and that he once choked her. The officers said Kloss asked them not to arrest Jaye...












Senate's rush to boot Jaye may backfire
May 9, 2001
Detroit Free Press.

I won't be sending any checks to David Jaye's legal defense fund. And the campaign to defend Jaye by digging up dirt on other state senators is silly, echoing Warren District Judge Susan Chrzanowski's similarly misguided attempts to deflect blame for her misconduct. But Jaye may have a legitimate beef with the state Senate's hurry-up effort to roast his chestnuts before Memorial Day. And if the object of this exercise is to defend...














Hearings to resume whether Sen. Jaye should be expelled
The Argus-Press
Owosso, Michigan
Malcolm Johnson
Associated Press
May 9, 2001

Lansing, Mich. [AP] - A police officer from Florida, where state Sen. David Jaye is accused of hitting his fiancee, testified that the woman was cut and still bleeding when he arrived at the scene.

"She said he's hit her in the past," Corp. robert Macarelli of the Lee County sheriff's office said Tuesday. "She said she wanted him to stop beating her."

Jaye was arrested April 12 in Florida after a dispute with Sonia Kloss and spent the night in the Lee County Jail. Jaye denied he struck Kloss, and she has recanted any accusations against him.

The officer's comments came as a special state Senate committee held its first full hearing on Jaye's right to remain in the Senate. The hearing was to resume Wednesday.

Jaye attended the committee hearing with three attorneys but didn't comment. He issued a letter Tuesday complaining that the hearing violated his civil irhgts and right to due process.

When it concludes its investigation, the six-member bipartisan committee could recommend that Jaye be expelled, censured or reprimanded.

In the letter he issued, Jaye argued that he hadn't had enough time to prepare and complained about "capricious and arbitrary committee rules" that would prevent discussion of their legislators' conduct besides his own.

The resolution recommending that Jaye be expelled cites a series of drunken driving convictions, a pending domestic battery charge in Florida and what it termed "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct."

Jaye said in his letter that he is owed a presumption of innocence on the domestic battery charge. He promised Sunday to resign if the Florida court convicts him, but he said he expects to be acquitted and accused Senate opponents of violating his rights.

At the hearing Tuesday, Bay County Prosecutor Joseph Sheeran said he may resurrect the charges stemming for a dispute last Nov. 19 at a Bay County gas station between Jaye and Kloss.

Jaye, a Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township, was never charged with assault in the Bay County incident. Prosecutors did charge him with violating the restrictions placed on his driver's license, but the charge was later dropped because Jaye had not been read his Miranda rights.

Meanwhile, a Florida judge on Tuesday delayed Jaye's hearing on the domestic battery charge for one week to give prosecutors more time to question witnesses.

Tony Schall, a spokesman for the state attorney's office in Florida, said the hearing is now scheduled for May 15. On that date, prosecutors will decide whether to retain the domestic violence charge, amend the charge or drop it, Schall said.
 
 
 












Hearings to begin today on ouster
Jaye says his views, not actions, spurred Senate
May 8, 2001
Detroit Free Press

Did he hit her, or didn't he? A historic Senate hearing that begins today on whether to expel Sen. David Jaye, R-Washington Township, was borne on allegations that he struck his fiancee in the face during an argument at her Florida home last month and at a gas station on I-75 in Bay County in November. While Jaye is charged with 12 incidents of misconduct -- including three misdemeanor convictions for drinking and driving and verbally abusing Senate staffers -- the alleged...













Sen. Jaye faces a triple-barreled attack in hearing today
Ludington Daily News
May 8, 2001

Lansing, Mich. [AP] - State Sen. David jaye faces a triple-barreled attack today on his ability to keep his Senate seat.

But the Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township isn't heading into his legal struggle alone. Charles Horton, a member of the 10th District Republican Committee, announced over the weekend that a legal defense fund has been established to help Jaye pay his lawyers.

Horton, of Macomb County, said Jaye is being punished for his conservative politics.

In what could be his toughest day in a career checked with legal runs-ins, Jaye faces a trio of challenges to keeping his seat:

-- A special Senate committee opens hearings on a resolution proposing Jaye's expulsion from the Senate. It cites a series of drunken driving convictions, a pending domestic battery charge in Florida over a dispute with his fiancee and what is termed "a recurring pattern of personal misconduct."

-- A court hearing is to be held in Florida on the domestic battery charge. He was arrested April 12 and spent the night in the Lee County Jail in Florida. If convicted of the misdemeanor, Jaye faces a maximum of one year in jail.

 










Jaye vows to quit if convicted
The Argus-Press
Owosso, Michigan
Karen Joseph
Associated Press
May 7, 2001

Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich. [AP] - State Sen. David Jaye says he will resign if a Florida court convicts him of beating his girlfriend, but says he is innocent and accuses authorities of violating his rights.

He also attacked Senate hearings that could remove him from office.

A special Senate committee meets Tuesday to consider 14 cases of alleged misconduct. Jaye also faces a court hearing Tuesday in Florida on charges that he assaulted his fiancee at her Fort Myers home on April 12.

At a news conference Sunday at a lawyer's home here, Jaye said he was confident of getting a fair hearing in the Senate. But Jaye called the effort to remove him a "railroad job" by Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow, R-Port Huron, and other political enemies.

"DeGrow's got 50 employees keeping secret files against people like Herbert Hoover. He's convicting me guilty before I've ever had a day in court," said Jaye, R- Washington Township.

Jaye said he has been targeted because he is "not the guy who goes along to get along," and because of a newletter he writes, the "Pork Belly Pamphlet."

He said he is confident that he will be exonerated by the full Senate.

"Most of the state senators are going into this with open minds," Jaye said.

He said he is disappointed with the Senate for spending time on his hearings.

"This is taking away time from the people's business," he said.

Jaye told The Macomb Daily of Mount Clemens for a Sunday story that voters in his Macomb County district should decide his fate.

We've got a bunch of Lansing politicians telling 54,160 people how to vote," said Jaye. He got 54,160 votes when he was elected in 1998.

The voters can throw me out of office next year if they choose," he told the newspaper. Senators "don't want to respect Macomb County voters. I say, let the voters decide."

"I've done some things I'm not proud of," he told The Macomb Daily.

'But I've never hit a woman. If convicted I will leave - myself, I wouldn't want to be in office. I will leave office."

Jaye, 43, has three misdemeanor drunken driving convictions, besides the charge that he committed domestic battery against his fiancee, Sonia Kloss. DeGrow has said Jaye also has a pattern of verbal abuse against Senate staff members.

Jaye on Sunday confirmed his earlier statement to the newspaper that he would quit if convicted of the Florida charge.

 
 
 








Panel to meet Tuesday on ousting state senator
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
May 4, 2001

Lansing - A special committee investigating Sen. David Jaye said yesterday it will begin hearing arguments next week on whether to oust the controversial Republican from the Senate, despite pleas for more time from Mr. Jaye's attorneys.

The committee plans to meet Tuesday after the Senate's 10 a.m. session. It defeated, on a 3-3 tie vote, a Democratic move to delay the next hearing until Thursday.

A resolution was released Tuesday listing the reasons to expel Mr. Jaye of Macomb County's Washington Township.

It included three misdemeanor drunken driving convictions, his April arrest in Florida on domestic battery charges, "a pattern of verbal abuse," against Senate staff members, and having a sexually explicit photo of his fiancee on his Senate-owned laptop computer where Senate staff members could see it.
 
 










Group fundss probe of Senators
Jaye's lawyer says he had nothing to do with it
May 3, 2001
Detroit Free Press

A Macomb County-based group that once worked to free convicted Detroit police officers Larry Nevers and Walter Budzyn from jail is paying for the private investigation of state Senate members. Citizens for Legal Reform wants to show that other senators have committed the same kinds of misdemeanors or misconduct for which they seek to expel Sen. David Jaye, R-Washington Township, said the group's director, Darin Chase. Chase, of Clinton Township, confirmed that his...







Attorney for Jaye rips bid to expel
Proceedings by Senate termed a witch-hunt
May 2, 2001
Detroit Free Press

An attorney for Sen. David Jaye fired blistering criticism at Jaye's Senate accusers Tuesday, calling a move to expel Jaye a witch-hunt based on meritless charges. The counterattack from the Macomb County Republican further charged the atmosphere in the Capitol, where expulsion hearings against him are to begin next week. Earlier Tuesday, formal charges against Jaye of Washington Township were filed in the Senate by Sen. Leon Stille, R-Spring Lake. Stille's...











David Jaye isn't worth expelling
May 2, 2001
Detroit Free Press

The state Senate's dilemma about Sen. David Jaye reminds me of the story about the old frontier editor who got into a fight with the sheriff of his town. When the conflict reached its climactic phase, the editor thundered in his editorial column that "Sheriff Jones ought to be shot." Sheriff Jones, understandably upset, demanded a retraction. The editor agreed that he shouldn't let the dispute stand there. So when the paper appeared the...










Senators say Jaye, queiries linked
Investigator asks about taxes, drugs, assaults
May 1, 2001
Detroit Free Press

Three Senate Republicans who received calls last weekend from a private investigator who attempted to grill them about their pasts all said Monday that Sen. David Jaye or his supporters were behind the inquiry. Jaye, R-Washington Township, is facing expulsion proceedings in the Senate. The proceedings were prompted by a string of incidents including domestic violence battery charges filed last month in Ft. Myers, Fla., involving an alleged incident with his fiancee. Sens. Leon...













Jaye fiancee rambles on 911 tape
Transcripts of April call tells of blood, scratches
May 1, 2001
Detroit Free Press

A transcript of a 911 call placed by state Sen. David Jaye's fiancee the day of their now-legendary Florida spat describes their tussle over her keys, his decision to retrieve his clothes from her house and her accusation that he struck her face. In a rambling exchange with a 911 operator, Sonia Kloss, 36, accuses Jaye, 43, of hitting her. She first says she is bleeding and later that she is bruised. Toward the end of the call, she describes her injuries as scratches...











David Jaye
State Senate should call for his resignation
April 25, 2001
Detroit Free Press

When in doubt, form a committee. That's what the state Senate did Tuesday, creating a six-member, bipartisan panel to review the conduct of Sen. David Jaye, R-Washington Township, and recommend what to do about this bad boy. Jaye will not make it easy for them by resigning, despite his recent arrest for domestic violence in Florida and his three previous busts for drunken driving. He should, though. Jaye's going to have a hard time doing much for his district...













Senate panel will consider Jaye's fate
He asks forgiveness
April 25, 2001
Detroit Free Press

Sen. David Jaye will face expulsion hearings launched Tuesday by a top-ranking senator who called Jaye unfit to serve his Macomb County district. Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow denounced Jaye, R-Washington Township, and named a six-member special Senate committee with subpoena power to investigate the maverick Macomb County lawmaker, including his April 12 arrest in Florida on charges of assaulting his fiancee. "Maybe 30 years ago it was OK to drive drunk and slap a...











State senator risks ouster
Telegraph Herald
April 24, 2001
Lansing, Mich. - David Jaye has two strikes against him as he tries to save his seat in the state Senate. A third strike, if it comes, could happen as early as this week.

The newest trouble for the blunt-spoken Republican is an April 12 arrest on charges of domestic battery stemming from a dispute with his fiancee. This comes less than a year after he finished serving 35 days in jail for drunken driving.

This week, Jaye faces the judgement of the Senate Republican caucus, which meets today and could vote to expel, censure or reprimand him.
 









National Briefing
MIDWEST
New York Times
Published: April 24, 2001
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/24/us/national-briefing.html


MICHIGAN: STATE SENATOR FACES PEER CENSURE -- A state senator with a history of run-ins with the law could face an unprecedented effort to expel him from office after a meeting with legislative leaders today. The senator, David Jaye, a conservative Republican from the Detroit suburbs, is being urged to resign in the wake of an arrest this month in Florida on a misdemeanor charge of hitting his fiancée in the face. He denies striking her. Mr. Jaye has been convicted of drunken driving twice. The Senate majority leader, Dan DeGrow, said he would meet with Mr. Jaye and Republican leaders today to discuss the matter. Several senators have said they would support action to remove Mr. Jaye from the Senate. John Carpenter (NYT)













Lawmaker Jaye risks expulsion from Senate
The Blade
Toledo, Ohio
Associated Press
April 23, 2001
Lansing - David Jaye has two stikes against him as he tries to save his seat in the state Senate. A third strike, if it occurs could happen as early as this week.

The newest trouble for Mr. Jaye, a blunt-spoken Republican lawmaker from Macomb County's Washington Township, is an April 12 arrest in Florida on charges of domestic battery stemming from a dispute with his fiancee. This occurred less than a year after he finished serving time in jail for drunken driving.

Mr. Jaye this week faces the judgement of the Senate Republican caucus, which meets tomorrow and could vote to expel, censure, or reprimand him then or soon afterward. No senator has ever been expelled.

"The caucus is very upset," said Senate Majority Floor Leader Joanne Emmons [R., Big Rapids]. "It's not so much anger as it is disappointment...He never seems to get it together. It's very embarrassing. Something is going to happen."

That something is not likely to be good news for Mr. Jaye.

Mr. Jaye, 43, spent the night in the Lee County Jail after being arrested April 12 in Fort Myers, Fla. He was assaulted by an inmate while there and taken to the hospital to have his ear stitched.

His fiancee, Sonia Kloss, posted his $2,500 bail the next day after his arraignment. Ms. Kloss, 36, has said she doesn't want to press charges.

But Florida prosecutors are going ahead with the case. Mr. Jaye has a May 8 court appearance on a misdemeanor charge of domestic violence battery, and faces a maximum penalty of up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Mr. Jaye denies hitting Ms. Kloss and said police in Florida pressured her to use words she did not want to use in their police report. "I want to make it clear that this dispute involved no hitting, no striking, no pushing, no shoving, no assault," he said last week.

It isn't the first time that state lawmakers have found themselves reacting to Mr. Jaye's controversies. He has been convicted twice of drunken driving offenses in the past decade, dropped a gun in a House GOP caucus meeting, and has twice been stripped of his Senate committee assignments.

All of his convictions have been for misdemeanors. The charge he faces in Florida is a misdemeanor as well.

Bill Ballenger, editor of Inside Michigan Politics, said Mr. Jaye is certain to be disciplined in some way. But he questions whether a lawmaker should be expelled after being charged with a misdemeanor.

"It would be a quick fix and easy solution if they have the guts to kick him out. But, it could cause them long-term problems, for the institution and for senators," said Mr. Ballenger, a former Republican senator.

State Sen. Alma Wheeler Smither [D. Salem Township] has some of the same concerns. A lawmaker can be expelled automatically only if he or she is convicted of subversion or a felony involving a breach of public trust in the past 20 years.

But the state constitution and state law gives the Senate and the House broad power over who can sit in each chamber. She said that makes it all too easy for lawmakers to get rid of someone who's a thorn in the majority's side or unpopular for other reasons.

Mr. Ballenger said Mr. Jaye might get more favorable treatment if he had built friendships during his nin years in the House and three in the Senate. Instead, he has often taken hard-line positions that have alientated even those who sometimes agree with his views.

"David Jaye scarcely has a friend in the Legislature," Mr. Ballenger said. "He has made himself obnoxious. He is his own worst enemy and he seems to get worse. People are fed up...It makes it easier to say, 'Let's get rid of him.' "

An informal survey of senators found they aren't taking his problems lightly, although many Democrats are deferring to what the Republican caucus decides. Republicans control the Senate 23-15.

Sen. Leon Still [R., Spring Lake] has drafted a resolution to penalize Mr. Jaye. "I hope he would resign and if he doesn't, I think he should be expelled," Mr. Stille said.

Lt. Gov. Dick Posthumus, who presides over the Senate, recommended last week that Mr. Jaye resign.
 
 
 
 
 









Two Strikes
The Argus-Press
April 23, 2001
Sen. David Jaye, shown in this 1997 handout, has two strikes against him as he tries to save his seat in the state Senate. A third strike, if it comes could happen as early as this week. Existing handicaps for him are his latest run-in with the law, his arrest in Florida on charges of domestic battery of his fiancee, and what colleagues say is little friendship among fellow Republicans. And now threatening to lower the boom on Jaye is the Senate Republican caucus, which is slated to meet Tuesday and could vote to expel, censure or reprimand him at any time afterward.











Senator accused of assaulting fiancee returns to Legislative session Tuesday
Ludington Daily News
Malcolm Johnson
Associated Press
April 17, 2001
Lansing, Mich [AP] - David Jaye, who was charged last week with assaulting his fiancee in Florida, on Tuesday denied any physical altercation with the woman and said he has no plans to resign from the state Senate.

"I want to make clear that this dispute involved no hitting, no striking, no pushing, no shoving, no assault," the Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township said.

When asked at a Tuesday morning news conference if he had a "spousal abuse problem," Jaye responded, "No, I do not."

Jaye was booked and jailed overnight last Thursday on a misdemeanor charge of domestic violence battery after police responded to a 911 call on a reported dispute between Jaye and his fiancee, Sonia Kloss, 36. He was released Friday after she posted his $2,500 bond.

Jaye, 43, said the police reports "do not accurately reflect the events of that morning."

In a statement released later Tuesday morinng, Jaye said the police pressured Kloss to "use words in the report she did not want to use."

While in the Lee County Jail in Florida, Jaye was attacked and needed 24 stitches to repair his injured ear, according to a report filed by sheriff's officials. He plans to get further surgery on his injured ear, said his defense lawyer, Robert Huth.

A jail inmate was charged with aggravated battery after witnesses said he struck Jaye because he thought the senator was using the phone for too long.

"Jaye, who termed the Florida incident "inappropriate," said he and Kloss have experienced stress from their long-distance relationship.

"I am in love with a very strong-willed, independent, passionate, beautiful woman, Sonia Kloss.

On Monday, Sen. Leon Stille, R-Spring Lake, called Jaye "an embarrassment" and said he is considering creating an expulsion resolution.

"The rules are pretty clear," Stille told the Detroit News for a story on Tuesday. "The Senate has the responsibility for keeping its house clean."

After the news conference, Jaye went into a caucus meeting with fellow Senate Republicans.

Jaye, who last year served 35 days in jail for drunken driving, was charged Friday in Florida with assaulting Kloss, of Fort Myers, Fla.

Under Florida's domestic violence law, authorities could still try to prosecute Jaye even if his fiancee doesn't want to pursue the case.

Jaye was arrested about noon Thursday after Kloss said he struck her in the face, and a witness gave a statement confirming her claim, according to arrest records.
 
 












State Senator says he won't resign
Posted: 4/17/2001
Northern Michigan 9 & 10 News
http://www.9and10news.com/category/story/?id=63915

(Lansing-AP) -- State Senator David Jaye says he won't resign from the Legislature and didn't hit his fiancee. The Macomb County Republican is charged in Florida with hitting the woman. His committee assignments were suspended the day after the arrest last week. (Detroit-AP) -- Detroit's mayor says he won't seek a third term because he wants his private life back. Dennis Archer announced the decision today. Detroit based political analyst Mario Morrow calls it a shock. Archer is a former state Supreme Court justice. (Harrison-AP) -- Police in Clare County say a truck scattered 52 tons of brake drums when it flipped over near Harrison today. The accident happened after the truck hit a patch of ice. The truck driver was thrown from the cab, but is in good condition at a Charlevoix hospital. (Fruitport-AP) -- Fruitport's school board plans to cut more than 20 staff positions to make ends meet. The board is facing a half (m) million-dollar budget shortfall. It's also looking at ways it might be able to seek alternative funding sources.












Jaye returns to Senate today after spending a night in jail
The Michigan Daily
April 17, 2001
Lansing [AP]- State Sen. David Jaye plans to return to session today, four days after being charged in Florida with assaulting his fiancee, his attorney said yesterday.

Robert Huth of Mount Clemens said the Washington Township Republican "hopes to continue his relationship with his fiancee," and said the couple plans to get counseling.

Jaye was booked and jailed overnight last Thursdasy on a misdemenaor charge of domestic violence battery after police responded to a 911 call on a reported dispute between Jaye and his fiancee, Sonia Kloss. He was released Friday after she posted his $2,500 bond.

Jaye, 43, told a Lee County [Fla] sheriff's deputy that he didn't hit Kloss, 36. He plans to make a statement at 8:45 a.m. today in Lansing on the matter.

While in the Lee County Jail in Florida, Jaye was attacked and needed 24 stitches to repair his injured ear, according to a report filed by sheriff's officials. He plans to get further surgery on his injured ear, Huth said.

A jail inmate was charged with aggravated battery after witnesses said he struck Jaye because he though the senator was using the phone for too long.

"He complains about a loss of hearing in that ear," Huth said. But he expressed optimism about the outcome of Jaye's problems.

"David's faced adversity before," Huth said. "He's upbeat and is facing the situation."

Jaye, who last year served 35 days in jail for drunken driving, was charged Friday in Florida with assaulting Kloss. She said then she would ask for the charges to be dropped. The Fort Myers, Fla., woman said she and Jaye plan to get married this year.

Under Florida's domestic violence law, authorities could still try to prosecute Jaye even if his fiancee doesn't want to pursue the case.
 











David Jaye Refuses To Quit
Washington Township Republican Arrested Last Week
April 15, 2001
Click on Detroit
http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/713815/detail.html

State Sen. David Jaye is heading back to the Legislature four days after his Florida arrest for allegedly assaulting his fiancée.

The Washington Township Republican spoke out Tuesday morning in Lansing. He's charged with a misdemeanor for hitting his fiancée, Sonia Kloss, 36, outside her Florida home last week. Jaye (pictured, left), 43, said that there is stress from a long-distance relationship, but the police report is wrong in saying that he struck her.

Jaye's lawyer said that the couple plans to get counseling. While jailed, Jaye was attacked and needed 24 stitches to repair an injured ear.

Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow suspended Jaye's committee assignments on Friday, the day after the arrest. DeGrow had restored the assignments just two weeks earlier after Jaye had lost them after a drunken-driving conviction. Jaye planned to attend Tuesday's Senate session.













Senator Jaye Gets Assignments Restored
Republican Stripped Of Duties After Pleading Guilty To Drunken Driving
March 27, 2001
Click On Detroit
http://www.clickondetroit.com/news/561191/detail.html

State Sen. David Jaye had his committee assignments restored Tuesday after completing an alcohol rehabilitation program.

Jaye, a Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township, Mich., was stripped of his Senate duties in June after pleading guilty to drunken driving. .He was charged with driving on a restricted license six months later, but was cleared of those charges last week

Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow restored Jaye as Chairman of the Senate Hunting, Fishing and Forestry Committee.

Jaye will also return to his membership on the Economic Development, International Trade and Regulatory Affairs Committee, the Families, Mental Health and Human Services Committee and the Senate Financial Services Committee.

Neither DeGrow nor Jaye commented on the restored positions.













Taking on an easy target is no real leadership
June 29, 2000
http://static.record-eagle.com/2000/jun/062900.htm

Toward the end of the latest legislative session, the leader of the Senate determined that a fellow senator had so embarrassed their institution that he had to be disciplined.

Sen. Dan DeGrow, the leader, stripped Sen. David Jaye, the embarrassment, of his committee assignments. That left Jaye with the ability to vote, thus representing his constituents, but without any real power.

DeGrow took this action because Jaye had pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor, second-offense operating under the influence of alcohol. "The Senate needed to take action," DeGrow said, adding that the decision was his alone.

Jaye, a 42-year-old Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township, has embarrassed the Senate before. He is the one you can count on to have the most extreme position on almost any bill and to make sure that everyone knows how he feels about things.

If there is an issue on which everybody can agree, it is that drunken driving is not good. The liquor companies discourage it; the laws prohibit it; the editorial writers condemn it without fear of getting a letter in rebuttal.

So it should come as no surprise that the senate leader also is appalled at the action of one of his colleagues. The question remains, however, if what he did was fair or wise or even useful.

Jaye, after all, is paying the price that others pay when they run afoul of the law. He will lose time and money; he could lose his license; he may even end up in jail.

Some people lose their jobs after a drunk driving conviction, but most do not. Most employers, especially those who consider themselves somewhat enlightened, understand that alcoholism is a condition best treated with treatment. If the courts handle the punishment, which they appear to be doing in Jaye's case, then the job of the employer is not to add to the punishment but to do something to prevent it from happening again.

The Senate, in this case, is not even Jaye's employer. He is employed by his constituents and they, for reasons it has been hard to understand, have consistently given him the job he wants in Lansing.

There appear to be no rules guiding the leader's decision. He just felt that he had to do something, so he did it. But that's not fair to voters, who never were told that they might be throwing away their vote if their candidate somehow crossed an ethical line that nobody had yet drawn.

And if DeGrow or other legislative leaders really want to do something about embarrassing behavior, they can expand their horizons into areas that are not already being punished by another branch of government.

They could go after the legislators who waste our time and money proposing bills to name the official state this and the official state that. Nobody needs them, nobody wants to waste the time and money. They can go after the intransigents who hold up all of the state's business just so they can lobby for a particular favorite cause. It happened with the telecommunications bill and DeGrow declined to strip that committee chairman of his powers, powers that clearly he was abusing to the detriment of everybody in the state.

Leaders should operate under clear rules, not make them up as they go along. They should apply the rules fairly with an eye toward setting a consistent standard. Slapping a drunk driver is easy. Taking on the more damaging excesses in the Legislature is the real test of leadership.














David Jaye: Senate punishments appropriate for offense
June 22, 2000
Detroit Free Press

State Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow took entirely appropriate action in stripping fellow Republican Sen. David Jaye of committee assignments because of Jaye's guilty plea to a charge of drunken driving. DeGrow also grounded Jaye, forbidding him from state-paid travel outside Michigan. DeGrow's actions stop short of depriving Jaye's constituents of their chosen senator but stand up for the integrity of the chamber at a time when cynicism about politics...
















Senator Loses Committee Jobs
June 21, 2000
By From Tribune News Services.
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2000-06-21/news/0006210080_1_jaye-legal-limit-misdemeanor-count

LANSING, MICHIGAN — State Sen. David Jaye was stripped of his committee assignments Tuesday, a week after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor drunken driving charge.

Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow (R-Port Huron) said Jaye will give up all committee assignments for the rest of the year and be barred from state-paid out-of-state business travel until next year.

"The Senate needed to take action," DeGrow said, adding that the decision was his alone.

Jaye, a 42-year-old Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township, was arrested March 5 and charged with second-offense operating under the influence of alcohol.

A test showed his blood-alcohol level was 0.11, slightly above the legal limit of 0.10 for drunken driving. On June 12, Jaye pleaded guilty to the misdemeanor count, which carries a 5- to 100-day jail sentence and fine. His license may also be suspended or revoked at his July 13 sentencing. Under DeGrow's sanctions, Jaye no longer will be the chairman of the Senate's Hunting, Fishing and Forestry Committee. He also will lose his seat on three others: Economic Development, International Trade and Regulatory Affairs; Families, Mental Health and Human Services; and Financial Services.











Senator stripped of privileges facing jail for driving drunk, he's sidelined at job
June 21, 2000
Detroit Free Press

While state Sen. David Jaye waits to learn how much freedom he could lose for his third drunken-driving offense, he has been stripped of all committee assignments and barred from state-paid business travel for the rest of the year. Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow, a Republican from Port Huron, made the decision Tuesday to levy the sanctions after consulting with some Senate members. DeGrow informed Jaye. The sanctions were in effect Tuesday. He said Jaye was disappointed but...














Jaye Stripped Of Committee Assignments
Senator Pleads Guilty To Drunken Driving Charge
Click On Detroit
June 20, 2000
Updated 11:21 p.m. EDT
http://html.clickondetroit.com/det/news/stories/news-20000621-031138.html

LANSING -- State Sen. David Jaye was stripped of his committee assignments Tuesday, a week after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor drunken driving charge.

Senate Majority Leader Dan DeGrow, (R) Port Huron, said Jaye will give up all committee assignments for the rest of the year. He will also be barred from state-paid business travel that would take him out of state, until next year.

"The Senate needed to take action," DeGrow said. The decision was his alone, he added.

Jaye, 42, is a Republican from Macomb County's Washington Township was arrested March 5 in Macomb Township and charged with second-offense operating under the influence of alcohol.

A test showed his blood-alcohol level was .11, above the legal limit of .10 for drunken driving.

Jaye pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor count on June 12, which carries a five- to 100-day jail sentence and fine. His license may also be suspended or revoked at his sentencing, set for July 13.

After his arrest Jaye said he has maintained a 100 percent attendance record in the Senate while attending alcohol abuse treatment. And, the senator says he plans to have family and friends drive him to work if he loses his license because of the ordeal.









Lawyer says Jaye had been drinking
He questions if Senator was drunk at his arrest
March 7, 2000
Detroit Free Press
State Sen. David Jaye's lawyer said Monday that the veteran lawmaker had been drinking before he got behind the wheel early Sunday. The question, he said, is whether Jaye was driving drunk at the time he was arrested. "He regrets the incident," said Jaye's lawyer, Robert Huth. "He wishes he had not put himself in a position to be arrested." Jaye said Monday that he was troubled by a recent divorce and the...













Jaye is held in drunken driving
Tougher laws may now turn on him
March 6, 2000
Detroit Free Press

With one drunken-driving conviction and another arrest for the offense Sunday, Republican state Sen. David Jaye may now be subjected to the very laws he supported to toughen punishments for repeat offenders. The controversial, conservative lawmaker from Washington Township, who has also been convicted of driving while impaired, will likely learn today what charges he now faces. Jaye, 42, was arrested about 1:30 a.m. Sunday on M-59 near Heydenreich in Macomb Township. He was taken to...












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