Tuesday, December 31, 2002

Officer George Hubbard - Muskegon Heights PD

Former police officer sentenced after ramming his girlfriend's car
July 14, 2004
(Muskegon County, June 14, 2004, 12:20 p.m.)

http://www.woodtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1939467&nav=0RceNtUZ

A former Muskegon Heights police officer accused of ramming his girlfriend's car is sentenced to18 months probation and fines.George Hubbard was charged with two felonies - assault with a deadly weapon and malicious destruction of property.

In February, he pled guilty to a lesser charge of a misdemeanor count of domestic violence.

Hubbard has been on unpaid suspension since he was charged in December 2002.










Former police officer pleads guilty to ramming girlfriend's car
5/18/04
(Muskegon County, May 18, 2004, 6:13 p.m.)

http://www.woodtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1877790&nav=0RceNECy

A former Muskegon Heights police officer accused of ramming his girlfriend's car has pled guilty to the crime. George Hubbard was charged with two felonies, including assault with a deadly weapon and malicious destruction of property.

On Tuesday, he pled guilty to a lesser charge of a misdemeanor count of domestic violence.

Hubbard has been on unpaid suspension since he was charged in December 2002.

Police Chief George Smith tells 24 Hour News 8 that Hubbard can continue to serve with a misdemeanor on his record but that no decision will be made until he is sentenced June 14.










JUDGE BARS EVIDENCE AGAINST SUSPENDED HEIGHTS POLICE OFFICER
Wednesday, 12, 2004
By John S. Hausman
Muskegon Chronicle, MI
http://www.mlive.com/news/muchronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-4/108437500336290.xml


A recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling has led a Muskegon judge to throw out a major part of the prosecution's evidence against a suspended Muskegon Heights police sergeant charged with ramming his ex-girlfriend's vehicle.

The Muskegon County Prosecutor's Office plans to ask 14th Circuit Judge James M. Graves Jr. to reconsider his April 29 order in the case against Sgt. George Hubbard. Hubbard, 54, of Muskegon Heights is charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and malicious destruction of personal property worth at least $1,000 but less than $20,000. Both are felonies.

Graves' ruling bars the prosecution from using statements the alleged victim made to police the day of the incident, Dec. 29, 2002. In two separate Muskegon police interviews, the woman said Hubbard used his pickup truck to bump her smaller vehicle twice while she was in it, once in the front, once in the back.

The woman soon recanted her accusations, saying Hubbard only struck her vehicle once, and only accidentally when he slid on the ice trying to leave her driveway. She later invoked her Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination, making her unavailable to either side at trial.

Without the woman's trial testimony against Hubbard, her statements to police were central to the prosecution case. Graves' ruling partially granted a motion by defense lawyers Al Swanson and Holly Spillan. The judge rejected another part of the motion that sought to bar tapes of the woman's three 911 calls while the alleged incident was under way. Those tapes are admissible at trial, Graves ruled.

Swanson praised the portion of Graves' ruling throwing out the police-interrogation evidence. "I think it was a great ruling, in that he kept out the major statements consistent with the Supreme Court ruling," Swanson said. However, Swanson said he will ask the Michigan Court of Appeals to reverse Graves on the 911 issue. Swanson said he also will ask the appeals court to stay Hubbard's trial -- now scheduled to start next Tuesday -- pending a decision on his appeal.

The final part of Graves' ruling is not in dispute. Graves barred use of the woman's testimony given last year at Hubbard's 60th District Court preliminary examination. Her testimony, contradicting what she told police the day of the incident, halted after the district judge advised her she had the right not to incriminate herself. She then invoked the Fifth Amendment before Swanson had a chance to cross-examine her.

That continuing inability to cross-examine is the reason for Graves' ruling. The judge ruled that using the woman's statements to police would violate the U.S. Constitution's "confrontation clause" -- the Sixth Amendment right of every accused person to confront and question the witnesses against him.

Citing a recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion in the case of Crawford vs. Washington, Graves ruled that the woman's statements to police constituted "testimony," thus making her a "witness" against Hubbard at the time she made them. And because the defense has never had a chance to cross-examine her, that means allowing prosecutors to use the statements at trial would violate the constitution, Graves decided.

In the Crawford decision, issued in March, the Supreme Court for the first time defined testimony as including "statements taken by police officers in the course of interrogations."

Graves ruled differently on the 911 tapes. The judge found that a person calling 911 "is not making statements which the party 'would reasonably expect to be used prosecutorially,"' in contrast to statements made under police interrogation.

Prosecutor Tony Tague said Tuesday his office will file a motion asking Graves to reconsider his ruling about the alleged victim's statements to police.

The legal issue for prosecutors is whether the woman's statements were a result of police "interrogation," the word the Supreme Court used in its recent ruling. The prosecutor's office argues that her initial police interviews did not constitute "interrogation" because they occurred in the immediate aftermath of the incident when the main issue allegedly was her safety, not Hubbard's prosecution.

"This is a completely new area of the law," Tague said. "We will be filing a motion for reconsideration to allow Judge Graves an opportunity to provide guidance to both prosecutors and defense attorneys as to the implications of the new law.

"We think this is a great opportunity for Muskegon County to define state law by giving a clear definition of what exactly constitutes interrogation by a police officer," Tague said.

Tague said his office will pursue the case against Hubbard even if Graves rules against the prosecution, although Tague acknowledged the case would be more difficult.
"Unfortunately, in this case the victim has become reluctant to cooperate with the prosecution," he said. "This is a common syndrome in domestic violence cases. We intend on proceeding with the case with any evidence which is available."

Asked if the case still would be pursued as a felony, or with the charges reduced to misdemeanors, Tague answered, "certainly we're re-evaluating the case based on the victim's complete lack of cooperation but will attempt to continue with the prosecution, because we have prior statements that clearly indicate that she was assaulted."











Chief to keep job despite charges against 3 cops
Thursday, January 23, 2003
The Detroit News
By Associated Press
http://www.detnews.com/2003/metro/0301/23/d08d-66898.htm

MUSKEGON HEIGHTS -- Three police officers have been charged with felonies in the last 30 days, but key city officials say they support Police Chief George Smith.

Muskegon County Prosecutor Tony Tague says he is working with Smith to correct "problems within the department," while urging city officials to take a hard look at the situation.

"I can assure the citizens of Muskegon Heights that something is going to be done," Tague said. "Whatever the problem is, it's going to get solved, because we as a community can no longer tolerate this type of conduct."

In the latest case, Sgt. Phillip E. Coleman, 41, was charged Thursday with criminal sexual conduct and writing checks on insufficient funds, the Muskegon Chronicle reported.

On Dec. 31, Sgt. George Hubbard, 52, was charged with assault with a deadly weapon for allegedly ramming a friend's car.

And on Dec. 17, road patrol officer Neil Siebert, 26, was charged with assault in connection with an alleged road rage incident. "These are not work-related incidents," said City Manager Melvin C. Burns II.













Muskegon Heights police sergeant charged with assault
Tuesday, December 31, 2002
Skyview
http://www.skyview.iserv.net/newsroomarchive02.html

George Hubbard also faces a count of malicious destruction of property, accused of ramming his truck into his girlfriend’s car yesterday, at her home at Forest Ave. and 7th St., near downtown Muskegon.

She said he followed her to the Muskegon police department when she went to report it, and rammed her car again.

He was off- duty.

Muskegon Heights Police Chief George Smith was shocked, saying Hubbard is one of his "more reliable people, a counselor" for young officers, and very "mild-mannered."


Officer George Hubbard - Muskegon Heights PD

Also See:

Officer George Hubbard charged with domestic violence


Former police officer sentenced after ramming his girlfriend's car
July 14, 2004
(Muskegon County, June 14, 2004, 12:20 p.m.)

http://www.woodtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=1939467&nav=0RceNtUZ

A former Muskegon Heights police officer accused of ramming his girlfriend's car is sentenced to18 months probation and fines.George Hubbard was charged with two felonies - assault with a deadly weapon and malicious destruction of property.

In February, he pled guilty to a lesser charge of a misdemeanor count of domestic violence.

Hubbard has been on unpaid suspension since he was charged in December 2002.










Former Chief Douglas Wright - Benton Harbor PD


Former Benton Harbor Police Chief Douglas Wright sued the city. He claimed that he had been wrongfully fired after he was criminally charged with domestic violence and obstruction of a police investigation.

Also See: Chief Wright charged with domestic violence and obstruction of investigation:
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2001/08/police-chief-douglas-wright-benton.html



         



Ex-chief to get $30,000 payment
Posted: Tuesday, December 16, 2003 12:00 am
Updated: 6:10 pm, Tue Nov 15, 2011.
By LYNN STEVENS / H-P Staff Writer
The Herald-Palladium
http://www.heraldpalladium.com/localnews/ex-chief-to-get-payment/article_6292a1c0-a0b4-585a-a00b-b18c2b715481.html

BENTON HARBOR -- City commissioners on Monday night approved a $30,000 settlement for former police Chief Douglas Wright.

The amount corresponds to the 3-month severance package the city pays fired department heads.

Wright was fired in November 2001, two days after he was charged with trying to obstruct a police investigation into domestic violence.

He allegedly beat and tried to choke his wife in their home on Aug. 2, 2001. The case was dropped in April 2002 after Wright's wife, Lucy, refused to testify.

In November 2002, Wright sued the city for wrongful discharge. He sought nearly four years of back pay.

His contract with the city was to run through June 30, 2005.

But the contract, which Wright himself had written, specified conditions under which he could be fired without paying off the remainder of the contract term. One of those was being charged with a crime.

Wright's lawyer, James Waters, wrote in his lawsuit that the contract provision was void because that language was a clear violation of state and federal policy.

Waters, a former city attorney, and the city's current attorney, Charlette Pugh Tall, have been negotiating the suit since fall.

A settlement conference was scheduled for last week before Judge Scott Schoefield in Berrien Trial Court. Had negotiations failed, the case was to go to trial Dec. 30.

Tall asked for a closed meeting Monday night to discuss it with commissioners.

After the closed session, which Commissioner Joan Brown did not attend, all the commissioners approved the settlement.

Mayor Charles Yarbrough said he cast his vote with reservations. Commissioner Ricky Hill said he was voting reluctantly.

Commissioners Steven McCoy and Ralph Crenshaw said they were not completely happy with the settlement, but voted for it as a cost-effective means of dealing with the lawsuit.

They have another suit to deal with soon. Former city manager Joel Patterson in October filed a wrongful discharge claim under the Whistleblower's Act.











Former Benton Harbor police chief sues city for firing
Posted: Tuesday, December 31, 2002 12:00 am
Updated: 5:44 pm, Tue Nov 15, 2011
By LYNN STEVENS / H-P Staff Writer
The Herald-Palladium
http://www.heraldpalladium.com/localnews/former-benton-harbor-police-chief-sues-city-for-firing/article_9ef65b5e-be0e-5c7b-9c91-36e8ad78fd1c.html

ST. JOSEPH -- Former Benton Harbor Police Chief Douglas Wright has sued the city claiming he was wrongfully fired in November 2001.

City Manager Joel Patterson fired Wright two days after he was charged with trying to obstruct a police investigation into whether he had assaulted his wife on Aug. 2, 2001, at the couple's home.

Charges against Wright were dropped in April. Berrien County Prosecutor James Cherry said the obstruction charge would be too difficult to prove, and Wright's wife, Lucy, refused to testify on the domestic violence charge.

But under the five-year contract Wright had written himself, even being charged with a crime was grounds for firing without pay.

In the lawsuit, Wright's lawyer, James Water of Muskegon Heights, said the contract language "is a clear violation of state and federal public policy and is void."

Water also claimed the firing was a violation of the city charter, city codes and denial of due process. He also wrote that Patterson had a personal vendetta against his client over a motor vehicle accident claim.

Wright was hired in June 2000 by then-city manager Ron Singleton. He was chosen from a field of more than two dozen applicants. His contract ran through June 30, 2005.

The suit asks for back pay and fringe benefits, reinstatement as police chief or pay for the unexpired years of Wright's 5-year contract, and compensation for pain, mental stress and emotional anguish. It also asks for compensation for damages to Wright's reputation and for impeding him from finding another job by knowingly making false and defamatory statements after his firing. Finally, it seeks payment of court costs, interest and attorney fees.

The case has been assigned to Judge John Fields. City Attorney Charlette Pugh Tall earlier this month filed an appearance on behalf of the city. Neither Pugh Tall or Patterson could be reached for comment.

Wright has demanded a jury trial, but no trial date has been set.

Wright was paid a salary of $60,000 per year and received two weeks of paid vacation.

 

Tuesday, November 26, 2002

Officer Daniel Linares - Detroit PD

Also See:

Officer Daniel Linares - CSC charge [June 24, 2006]













BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS
(COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE)
Minutes of the Regular Board of Police Commissioners Meeting
Thursday, January 23, 2003
The regular meeting of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners was held on
Thursday, January 23, 2003, at 3:00 p.m., Police Headquarters, 1300 Beaubien
– Rm. 328, Detroit, MI 48226.
4. SECRETARY REPORT – EXEC. DIR. MCDONALD

Suspension
On January 23, 2003, Police Officer Daniel Linares, badge 3780, assigned to the Sixth Precinct, was suspended without pay by Assistant Chief of Police Walter E. Shoulders.
On November 27, 2002, the Internal Affairs Section received a Preliminary Complaint Record regarding off-duty Officer Linares, alleging “Child Abuse.”

According to the information, on November 26, 2002, officers of the Fifth Precinct responded to St. John’s Hospital regarding a child abuse report. The investigation revealed that both parents are police officers. The complainant is a three-month-old female infant, who lives with her mother and a female roommate. The roommate baby-sits the complainant.

On the above date, the complainant’s mother made arrangements with Officer Linares to watch the baby at her house between the hours of 12:00 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. The roommate stated she stopped by the house at 12:00 p.m. for lunch and left at 12:30 p.m. She stated that everything was fine with the complainant. When the roommate returned at 2:05 p.m., Officer Linares told her that the complainant was sleeping. Officer Linares left the location at approximately 2:20 p.m. At approximately 3:15 p.m., same date, the roommate checked on the complainant and observed redness and bruising on the left side of her face. She contacted the mother of the complainant. The mother returned home and conveyed her to St. John’s Hospital. At the hospital, the doctor examined the complainant and observed bruising and a bite mark consistent with child abuse. She was admitted to the hospital in stable condition and later released to the custody of her mother.

On January 15, 2003, Magistrate Thomas Shannon, of 36th District Court, issued felony warrant #36-03-55584, charging Officer Linares with “Child Abuse 2nd Degree.”

On January 16, 2003, Officer Linares was arraigned before Magistrate Thomas Shannon, and he stood mute to the charge and a not guilty plea was entered on his behalf. He was released on a $1,000.00 personal bond. His preliminary examination is scheduled for January 28, 2003.

Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Officer Linares be charged with, but not limited to the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:
CHARGE: CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER; CONTRARY TO THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CODE OF ETHICS, THIS BEING IN VIOLATION OF GENERAL ORDER 72-17(R), SECTION K. SUBSECTION 65.
Unless contravened by this Commission, the above suspension without pay will stand.
There were no contraventions to the above suspension.

[MI POLICE OFFICER INVOLVED PERPETRATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LAW ENFORCEMENT MURDER SUICIDE]

Commissioner Kurt Kramer - Macomb

Also See:
Commissioner Kurt Kramer charged with domestic violence [ November 17, 2000]

Commissioner Kurt Kramer charged for assaulting police officer [January 2001]



  Macomb County official to undergo counseling
Detroit Free Press
December 23, 2003
BY ALEXA CAPELOTO
http://www.freep.com/news/locmac/comm23_20031223.htm

A Macomb County commissioner is to spend 30 weeks in domestic violence counseling under a plea deal stemming from a June confrontation with his girlfriend that ended in a car collision.

Roland Fraschetti, a St. Clair Shores Republican, pleaded guilty Friday to reckless driving, a 90-day misdemeanor. The charge will be reduced to careless driving, a civil infraction, if he successfully completes the counseling.

Fraschetti was accused of backing his SUV into his girlfriend's Saturn sedan with such force that it rolled onto the hood of the smaller car. The two had just argued and were in the driveway of a St. Clair Shores home owned by Fraschetti. No one was seriously injured.

"The victim didn't want me to charge him at all," said Joseph McCarthy Jr. of the St. Clair County Prosecutor's Office, which handled the case because of Fraschetti's position in Macomb County. "I told her I have to do something to make sure this doesn't happen again."

A judge will take Fraschetti's guilty plea under advisement while the commissioner attends weekly group counseling sessions run by Catholic Social Services of St. Clair County. Any failure to finish the program could result in a reckless driving conviction.

Sebastian Lucido, Fraschetti's attorney, said his client considers the deal a proper end to what essentially was a car accident. "They got into an argument and it got heated, but he never laid a finger on her," Lucido said. "The man does not have a violent bone in his body." What really happened, Lucido said, is that "she was in a car behind him and just pulled up. When he hit the car, he was at fault."

With the careless driving infraction, Fraschetti faces three points on his driving record and a $100 fine. He must also pay $750 for the counseling program, which is the same one Commissioner Kurt Kramer was ordered into after pleading no contest to assaulting his wife in June.










OFFICIAL AGREES TO COUNSELING
Detroit Free Press
December 17, 2002


December 17, 2002 •• 428 words •• ID: 0212170250. Detroit Free Press. Four days after being sworn in as a Macomb County Commissioner, Kurt Kramer appeared in court on domestic violence charges and agreed to seek counseling with his wife. His pretrial hearing Monday at 42-2 District Court in Mt. Clemens was adjourned by Judge Paul Cassidy after Kramer's lawyer said he would seek counseling with his wife, who wants to reconcile and save their marriage. Kramer, 47, was charged Nov. 27 after his wife, Russian native Lyubov Arestova, 34, told...










More Republican Family Values
05-Dec-02Republicans
http://archive.democrats.com/preview.cfm?term=Republicans

Republican Kurt Kramer, newly elected as a Macomb County MI commissioner, was arrested for shoving and striking his wife and choking his 4-year-old stepson.

His wife, a native of Russia who speaks little English, said Kramer pushed and hurt her after she refused to pose for nude photographs.

When her older son tried to intervene, Kramer allegedly pushed him out of the house. Kramer also resisted arrest, being subdued only after "a struggle and much difficulty."

This splendid example of family values had been convicted in 2001 of assaulting a police officer when the officer was trying to serve him with a personal protection order on behalf of Kramer's previous wife. The chairwoman of the Macomb Republican Party responded to the arrest by suggesting that Kramer get professional counseling.









Man to take county post despite charges
Commissioner-elect is facing 2 abuse counts
December 5, 2002
BY MARY OWEN AND NANCY
DETROIT FREE PRESS
http://www.freep.com/news/locmac/kramer5_20021205.htm

A newly elected Macomb County commissioner will face a judge on domestic violence charges days after he is sworn into office.

Kurt Kramer, 47, was charged Nov. 27 with two counts of domestic violence and released the next day on $300 bond. His pretrial hearing is scheduled for Dec. 16 in 42-2 District Court, which is temporarily located in Mt. Clemens.


His wife, Russia native Lyubov Arestova, 34, told police that her husband attacked her Nov. 26 after she refused to take off her clothes and pose for nude photographs, according to police documents.

One of his previous wives, Oxana Kramer, a Ukrainian mail-order bride, obtained a personal protection order against him almost two years ago, said Chesterfield Township Police Lt. Dave Marker. Kramer has been married four times.

While being charged with a misdemeanor doesn't prevent a commissioner from serving on the board under county rules, some of Kramer's future colleagues are wary of the bad publicity that follows such allegations.

"People have a negative enough image of politics without having this happen," said Commissioner Diana Kolakowski of Sterling Heights. "It doesn't exactly support the family values platform."

But Commissioner Mike Sessa of Harrison Township, who bailed Kramer out of jail, said people are unfairly assuming that Kramer is guilty. He noted that Kramer is the sole caregiver of his 80-year-old father. "I can't understand why this would happen to him," said Sessa, who has known Kramer for four years. "I would give him the benefit of the doubt."

Kramer of New Baltimore said he plans to attend the Dec. 12 swearing-in ceremony and take his seat Jan.1. He said his personal life will not interfere with his commission duties.

He listed his job priorities as road improvements and finding a permanent location for the 42-2 District Court, temporarily housed in the county jail. "Give me a chance to prove myself," Kramer said. "I plan to do what they elected me to do."

Kramer, an Air Force reservist, said he and Arestova were the perfect couple during his successful bid for Macomb County's 14th District, which includes Chesterfield Township, Lenox Township, New Baltimore and New Haven Village.

The Republican beat Democrat Wendy Iacobelli for the seat being vacated by commission Chairman John Hertel, who announced his resignation in May.

Arestova, who Kramer said has been learning English since she arrived in the United States, helped with mailings and neighborhood walks and attended victory parties, Kramer said. But soon after, Arestova became short-tempered, he said. Kramer said Wednesday that he hasn't seen his wife since the incident.

He said the trouble began when he asked if he could put some of her clothes, which smelled like cigarette smoke, in their enclosed porch because the smell was bothering him. Kramer said she stormed out of their bedroom wearing only a robe and went to her son's room where she changed and later threatened to tell police he had tried to rip her clothes off.

On Wednesday evening, Arestova said, "It's a very bad situation." She declined further comment, saying her English is bad and her social worker could better explain her side of the story.

Police were called to the scene by Arestova's 14-year-old son who said Kramer choked him, Marker said.

Kramer, a jet fueler at Selfridge Air National Guard Base, said he met Arestova through a friend when he was vacationing in Russia in June 2001. They communicated for a while before she came to the United States with her son. The couple lived together for about six months before marrying in January. Kramer believes the couple could still work things out.

Ex-wife Oxana Kramer sought a personal protection order against him in January 2001. But he assaulted a police officer who went to Kramer's house to serve the papers, according to police reports. Kramer pleaded guilty to the assault and battery charge. He served one year of probation to the misdemeanor charge.

The commission seat is Kramer's first elected post. He served briefly on the Oakland County Board of Commissioners in the early 1990s, when he lived in Oak Park. He was appointed to complete a term left vacant by a commissioner who died. Kramer lost his 1994re-election bid for the seat.












Official accused of assaulting wife
Police say Macomb commissioner-elect beat her after she refused to pose for nude pictures
11/29/02
By Gene Schabath
The Detroit News
http://www.detnews.com/2002/metro/0211/29/c02-23081.htm

CHESTERFIELD TOWNSHIP -- Newly elected Macomb County Commissioner Kurt Kramer was charged with assaulting his wife, two years after allegedly attacking his first wife.

The most recent allegation comes from his wife of 10 months, Lyubov Arestova, 34, said Chesterfield Police Detective Jim Gates.

Kramer tried to tear off his Russian-born wife's clothing and attacked her in the upstairs bedroom of their home when she refused to pose nude for photographs that he wanted to put on the Internet, Gates said.

Kramer first choked the 34-year-old woman's 14-year-old son and forced him out of the house, Gates said.

Kramer, 48, was arraigned Wednesday before 42nd District Judge Paul Cassidy of New Baltimore on two counts of domestic violence. He was released under $300 bond.

Domestic violence is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 93 days in jail.

Kramer said in an interview Thanksgiving Day that he is innocent and is confident he will be acquitted. "That is a totally ludicrous statement on my wife's part," Kramer said. "It appears to be part of a big scam. She gets married to an American citizen and then uses the domestic violence charge to fulfill whatever agenda she has. I think she wants the INS (immigration and Naturalization Service) to look favorably on her if she files the domestic abuse charge. Her status in the United States is pending. She doesn't even have a green card."

Kramer said he wanted to take the photographs of his wife because she undresses in front of her teen-age son. He claims he was attacked by his wife, but said police would not listen to his side of the story.

Kramer was elected to the county board Nov. 5 to represent District 14, which includes Chesterfield, Lenox Township and New Baltimore. The part time position pays $33,000 a year.

He said he lost his job at Kmart last year and now works part-time as a fuel specialist at Selfridge Air National Guard Base where he is also in the Air Force reserves.

He previously was arrested Nov. 17, 2000, for assaulting his first wife, also a Russian-born woman, Oxana Savina, Gates said.
She was in her late 30s, Gates said.

"This one is the same as the first one," Gates said. "Almost identical."

His first wife divorced Kramer in January 2001. He married his new wife in January of this year. Kramer said he met her in Russia while on duty as a reservist.

The first domestic abuse charge was dropped when Kramer pleaded guilty to resisting arrest. He was placed on probation for one year and fined $200. Gates said the arresting officer was attacked when he went to Kramer's house to serve him a personal protection order the first wife had obtained against him after he attacked her.

Kramer's new wife gave police two rolls of film she had shot of injuries suffered in previous attacks, Gates said.

Macomb County Board Chairman John Hertel said the county legal staff is investigating whether Kramer can be expelled from office if convicted.

"It's a sad and disturbing situation," Hertel said. Kramer replaces Hertel as the commissioner from District 14. Hertel did not run for re-election.

Kramer said he plans to be at swearing-in ceremonies for county commissioners on Dec. 12.












Recently Elected Official in Michigan Denies Domestic Violence Charge
From The Associated Press, 11/29/02
http://ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGAO0W3X39D.html

CHESTERFIELD TOWNSHIP, Mich. - A recently elected county commissioner is facing domestic violence charges for allegedly shoving and striking his wife.

Kurt Kramer, 47, expected to take office in January, was arrested Tuesday and spent a night in jail before being released on a $300 bond. His next court hearing was scheduled for Dec. 16, four days after he is to be sworn in to the Macomb County Board of Commissioners.

According to police, Kramer's wife, Lyubov Arestova, said he pushed and hurt her after she allegedly refused to pose for nude photographs. He also is accused of choking a 14-year-old relative in the melee.

Kramer told the Associated Press on Thursday, "No, I didn't hit her, and no, I didn't strike her." He also denied asking her to pose nude.

Kramer has a previous assault and battery conviction for slamming a door on a police officer's arm and leg as the officer tried to serve Kramer with a personal protection order from his former wife, who alleged that he assaulted her.







[MI POLICE OFFICER INVOLVED PERPETRATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LAW ENFORCEMENT MURDER SUICIDE]

Wednesday, November 20, 2002

Officer Rhaseen Blake - OIDV victim - Detroit PD


EX-BOYFRIEND CHARGED IN VIOLENCE
November 22, 2002 •• 441 words •• ID: 0211220507. Detroit Free PressOakland County prosecutors have charged a man who police say was shot in the thigh after he attacked his ex-girlfriend, an off-duty Detroit police officer, while she was heading to work from her Farmington Hills apartment. The warrant charges Wilson Roberts, 33, with domestic violence -- a misdemeanor. If convicted, he could face a 93-day maximum jail term. Roberts allegedly attacked Rhaseen Blake, 28, about 6:30 a.m. Wednesday as she unlocked her car in the parking lot of her



Thursday, August 15, 2002

Officer Timothy Hibbard - Samuel M. Thomas convicted for dragging Officer Hibbard w/vehicle

Also See:

Officer Timothy Hibbard - Jackson PD - A family in crisis...
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2014/01/officer-timothy-hibbard-jackson-pd.html

Officer Timothy Hibbard - Self-defense shooting of murderer Marshan Worthey [ August 08, 2008]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2008/08/officer-timothy-hibbard-self-defense.html

Officer Timothy Hibbard - Gerald Landrum charged w/attempted murder of Hibbard. [April 17, 2004]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2004/04/officer-timothy-hibbard-gerald-landrum.html




Samuel M. Thomas had only 9 months left on parole for his 1999 breaking and entering conviction, when he was pulled over for a traffic stop on August 15, 2002 by Officer Timothy Hibbard. 

Thomas had no driver's license, vehicle registration, or proof of insurance.
During the traffic stop, Thomas attempted to drive off. He dragged Officer Hibbard with his vehicle several yards, at speeds up to 40 mph. At one point, Timothy attempted to 'scrape' Hibbard's body off his vehicle by driving up against a tree.

Officer Hibbard suffered a broken neck in the assault.

Thomas later stated that he had been on parole at the time, he did not want to go back to jail, and that he did not care what he did to try to get away.

At trial, Thomas made the following comment about the injury he caused to Officer Hibbard: "I was fleeing and eluding to keep from going to jail. He put his self in danger." 

Thomas was convicted of resisting arrest causing serious injury to Officer Timothy Hibbard and sentenced in December 2002, to 20 - 40 years in prison.

Thomas spent the first five years of his incarceration attempting to have his conviction overturned. 
















Appeal rejected for man who dragged cop
Jackson Citizen Patriot (MI) 
Wednesday, August 22, 2007 

Retired Circuit Judge Alexander Perlos was not known for exceeding sentencing guidelines. 

But he unloaded on Samuel M. Thomas for dragging a Jackson police officer through the street in 2002. He sent Thomas to prison for 20 to 40 years, well above the recommended four to 16 years. 

Every judge since has sided with Perlos, including a federal judge who denied Thomas' appeal on Tuesday. 

Thomas, 41, exhausted his appeals in state courts two years ago. 

Thomas was convicted of resisting arrest causing serious injury to Officer Timothy Hibbard. 

The Michigan Court of Appeals ruled Hibbard suffered a "serious impairment of bodily function" in the Aug. 15, 2002, incident, and that the sentence was fair given the circumstances. The state Supreme Court declined to hear the appeal. 

Testimony indicated Hibbard's arm was wedged in the car door as Thomas drove 80 yards down the street at 40 mph. Thomas had violated parole and attempted to flee when Hibbard pulled him over in a traffic stop. 

Hibbard returned to the force after six weeks and was injured again two years later in a scuffle with a drunken suspect who attempted to choke him. 
















Appeals fail to overturn two convictions
Jackson Citizen Patriot (MI)
Sunday, May 1, 2005

He dragged a Jackson cop through the streets, breaking his neck. 

She embezzled $1.5 million from the Jackson office of AAA of Michigan.
Both got what was coming to them, Michigan's high courts ruled this week in rejecting appeals by Samuel M. Thomas and Nancy L. Romano. 

Thomas was convicted of resisting arrest causing serious injury to Officer Timothy Hibbard. 

Circuit Judge Alexander Perlos, now retired, exceeded guidelines with a sentence of 20 to 40 years in prison. The recommended minimum range was four to 16 years. 

The Michigan Court of Appeals ruled in July that Hibbard suffered a "serious impairment of bodily function" in the Aug. 15, 2002, incident, and that the sentence was fair given the circumstances. 
Hibbard was back on the job after six weeks. 

The Supreme Court denied hearing the appeal, which means Thomas essentially has hit a brick wall with little chance of an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, said Jerrold Schrotenboer, chief appellate attorney for Jackson County. 

Prosecutors alleged Thomas, 39, dragged Hibbard wedged in his car door for 80 yards down the street at 40 mph. Thomas had violated parole and attempted to flee when Hibbard pulled him over in a traffic stop. 

Romano, 58, is in the second year of a 5- to 14-year prison sentence for embezzlement. She was sentenced in February 2004 after pleading guilty to charges of embezzling, uttering and publishing and forgery. 

Like Perlos, Circuit Judge Charles Nelson exceeded guidelines because he said they did not accurately reflect the magnitude of the crime. Romano, a 36-year employee of AAA, used her position as a claims adjuster to bilk the company out of $1.5 million over several years. 

Investigators said she "piggy-backed" legitimate claims checks with identical forged checks that she stole. 

She allegedly spent the money on cars, mortgages, home repairs, credit debt, trips, taxes and perks for her family. 

Officials believe she stashed a big chunk of the cash, which she denies. 

Probation officials recommended a sentence of five to 23 months. 

The Michigan Court of Appeals declined to hear Romano's appeal. 

She can appeal to the state Supreme Court. 

Judges have discretion in going under or over sentencing guidelines if their stated reasons are compelling. 
















April 26, 2005

Michigan Supreme Court denied Gerald Thomas' appeal of his conviction for his assault on Officer Timothy Hibbard.


















Court upholds judge's sentence
Jackson Citizen Patriot (MI)
Friday, July 16, 2004

A man who dragged a Jackson police officer with his car, breaking his neck, was justly convicted and sentenced fairly by a judge who exceeded guidelines, the state Court of Appeals ruled. 

Samuel M. Thomas did cause "serious impairment of body function" to Officer Timothy Hibbard in an Aug. 15, 2002, traffic stop that turned violent, the higher court concluded. 

Further, Circuit Judge Alexander Perlos did not abuse his discretion in sentencing Thomas to 20 to 40 years for resisting arrest causing serious injury to an officer. The recommended minimum range was about four to 16 years. At sentencing, Perlos called Thomas a "bad actor" with no sign of improving. 

Thomas, 38, was sentenced as a habitual offender. He blamed Hibbard's injuries on the officer, saying it was Hibbard's choice to jump in his car to attempt to stop him. Police said Thomas knew he had violated parole and fled with no regard to the officer's safety. 

Hibbard was dragged 80 yards at up to 40 mph, injuring his leg and neck. He missed two and a half months of work initially. 

A Jackson officer for six years, Hibbard recently was involved in a scuffle with a parolee who was accused of trying to choke him. 

In the appeal, Thomas argued there was no "serious impairment of a body function," and that Perlos did not have a compelling reason to exceed sentencing guidelines. The appeals court rejected both arguments. 

"The officer lost the use of that limb (left leg) almost completely for several weeks while he was on crutches and, to a more limited extent, during the several months that he was unable to return to work," the court stated. 

And, while there was no immediate nerve damage causing paralysis, "the treating physician testified there was a fifty-fifty possibility that future problems could develop as a result of the broken vertebral bone." 

The ruling, now case law, clarifies the "serious impairment" category to include a leg injury that is more long-lasting than seemingly more serious injuries. The court cited a head wound rendering someone comatose for three days with no lasting impact. 

Regarding the stiff sentence, Perlos got it right, the appeals court said. The points system in sentencing guidelines did not take into account Thomas's "complete disregard for the officer's life," nor his 34 misconduct citations in a previous prison sentence, the ruling stated. 

















July 13, 2004

Michigan Court of Appeals denied Samuel M. Thomas' appeal of his conviction for assault of Officer Timothy Hibbard.





















Incident draws stiff sentence
Jackson Citizen Patriot (MI)
Thursday, December 12, 2002

A Jackson man will spend 20 to 40 years in prison for dragging a city police officer and breaking the officer's neck in what began as a routine traffic stop. 

Samuel Thomas, 36, was sentenced Wednesday by Circuit Judge Alexander Perlos to a minimum of 20 years and a maximum of 40 years for the Aug. 15 incident in which Officer Timothy Hibbard was dragged about 80 yards at speeds of up to 40 mph. 

Thomas, a habitual offender, was convicted Nov. 6 of resisting and obstructing an officer causing serious injury. 

"I'm just glad it worked out and he won't be around to hurt society anymore," said Hibbard, who was off work until November. 

"I'm very satisfied with the sentence," Chief Assistant Prosecutor David Lady said. "It's above the guidelines and reflects the seriousness of the offense and the danger he put Officer Hibbard in." 
Perlos called the act deliberate and intentional. 

"You're just a bad actor," Perlos told Thomas before the sentence. 

"There's no question about that and you've been one for a long time and you're not getting any better." 

Thomas has been in prison since he was arrested later Aug. 15 in Detroit on a parole violation. He had been paroled in 1999 after serving eight years in prison for breaking and entering. 

Hibbard said he stopped Thomas about 12:45 a.m. because his headlights weren't on. Thomas gave him a false name and said he had no license or identification. 

When Thomas started the truck and began to move, Hibbard stuck his arm in and wedged his body in Thomas' lap before he was dragged. 

Thomas' attorney, Paul Adams, maintained his client was simply trying to avoid a night in jail. Perlos disagreed. 

Thomas said he was sorry the officer was hurt, but said it was Hibbard's choice to jump into the vehicle.
















December 11, 2002

Samuel M. Thomas was sentenced to 20 - 40 years in prison for his August 2002 assault on Officer Timothy Hibbard.



















Man convicted in cop dragging
Jackson Citizen Patriot (MI)
Thursday, November 7, 2002

Parolee could face life in prison after being found guilty in the incident in which an officer suffered a broken neck. 

A new state law protecting police officers was written for people like Samuel Thomas, local police and prosecutors say. 

Thomas, 36, was the first man in Jackson County charged with resisting and obstructing a police officer causing serious injuries, and also was the first found guilty of the law enacted July 15. 

Circuit Judge Alexander Perlos convicted Thomas on Wednesday after hearing six prosecution witnesses and Thomas, who blamed Officer Timothy Hibbard for injuries the officer sustained Aug. 15 after a routine traffic stop. 

"I was fleeing and eluding to keep from going to jail," Thomas testified. "He put his self in danger." 

Defense attorney Paul Adams, too, questioned why Hibbard reached into Thomas' Chevrolet S-10 pickup in an attempt to turn off the ignition on Adrian Street. 

"I can't imagine getting into a vehicle that is attempting to flee and elude," Adams said in his summation in the bench trial. 

Perlos didn't buy Thomas' explanation, saying he thought it interesting Thomas would blame the incident on Hibbard. 

"The officer should be commended because that was his duty," Perlos remarked. It is his job to nab fleeing subjects, and reaching in a vehicle for the ignition was Hibbard's discretion, Perlos said. 

While resisting and obstructing is a felony that carries a five-year prison sentence, adding serious injury boosts the maximum sentence by 10 years. Because Thomas is a habitual offender, he could be sentenced to life in prison on Dec. 11, Chief Assistant Prosecutor David Lady said. 

Thomas has been in prison since he was arrested later in the day on Aug. 15 in Detroit on a parole violation. He had served eight years in prison and was paroled in 1999. 

Hibbard said he stopped Thomas about 12:45 a.m. because his headlights were not on. Thomas gave him a false name and said he had no license or identification. 

When Thomas started the truck and began to move, Hibbard stuck his arm in and wedged his body in Thomas' lap. 

"The next thing I remember is being pulled away. My arm was stuck in the steering wheel," Hibbard said. "I told him to stop and he wouldn't. At one point I was no longer worried about arresting him. I just wanted him to stop." 

Officers Steven Scarpino and Andrew Flint testified Hibbard was dragged or carried up to 245 feet. Hibbard said he thought Thomas was driving 30 to 40 mph and trying to shuck him off against a tree. 

At some point, Hibbard fell out of the truck and rolled across the street against a curb. His head and neck were in serious pain and he couldn't move, he said. 

"Not only had he broken his neck, but we thought he broke his left leg," Hibbard's family physician, Dr. Timothy Kval, testified. Doctors eventually learned the leg was sprained and the seventh cervical vertebrae was fractured. 

Although "severely risky," the doctor said, the injury did not cause nerve damage. Hibbard underwent therapy after four days in the hospital, returned to light duty in October and full duty this week. 

Detective Timothy Gonzalez, the chief investigator, encountered Thomas at the Wayne County Jail shortly after his arrest. He was initially "aggressive and rude," Gonzalez said, but eventually confessed. 

"Without any questioning, he said he was sorry, that he didn't mean to hurt the officer," Gonzalez testified. 

At the same time, the detective said, Thomas blamed the incident on Hibbard for trying to stop him. 

"He did not care what he did to get away," Gonzalez said. "He was determined not to go to jail." 
















1999 - 

Samuel M. Thomas paroled on breaking and entering conviction.
He had been paroled in 1999 after serving eight years in prison for breaking and entering. 

















July 24, 1998

Samuel Thomas filed appeal against Parole Board.


















October 24, 1991 - 

Samuel Thomas sentenced to 3 - 22 years for breaking and entering conviction.

















October 06, 1990 - 

Samuel Thomas charged with breaking and entering.



Wednesday, July 10, 2002

Officer Tim Nixon - Suspended - State Conservation

STATE CONSERVATION COP TAKES LEAVE AFTER ARREST

July 12, 2002 •• 324 words •• ID: 0207120505. Detroit Free Press.

A top-ranking state conservation officer is on indefinite paid leave from his job following his arrest Sunday on a charge of domestic violence. Capt. Tim Nixon, 39, of Hastings was taken into custody and released after an altercation with his wife at a residence, which is not their own, near New Buffalo in southwest Michigan, according to police. Nixon was arraigned on a first offense Wednesday in 5th District Court in St. Joseph. Nixon could not be reached for comment. Berrien


Sunday, July 7, 2002

Officer Tim Nixon - State Conservation - Hastings

STATE CONSERVATION COP TAKES LEAVE AFTER ARREST

July 12, 2002 •• 324 words •• ID: 0207120505. Detroit Free Press.

A top-ranking state conservation officer is on indefinite paid leave from his job following his arrest Sunday on a charge of domestic violence. Capt. Tim Nixon, 39, of Hastings was taken into custody and released after an altercation with his wife at a residence, which is not their own, near New Buffalo in southwest Michigan, according to police. Nixon was arraigned on a first offense Wednesday in 5th District Court in St. Joseph. Nixon could not be reached for comment. Berrien


Monday, July 1, 2002

Officer Mark Roll - Detroit PD

In 2002, Officer Mark Roll was charged with domestic violence.





4. SECRETARY REPORT - EXEC. DIR. GOSS

Suspension
On March 27, 2003, Police Officer Mark Roll, Badge 1128, assigned to The Gaming Administration Section, was suspended without pay, by Chief Jerry A. Oliver, Sr.

On January 12, 2003, Police Officer Mark Roll, was involved in a physical altercation with a subject while at a bar in East Tawas, Michigan.

According to the information, Officer Roll’s male friend was involved in a physical altercation. As his friend was being escorted out of the bar, Officer Roll allegedly punched the complainant. In addition, Officer Roll punched the glass of the front door causing it to shatter. Misdemeanor warrant #03-224FM was issued charging Officer Roll with “Malicious Destruction of Building - $200 or More, but Less than $1,000.”

On March 24, 2003, Officer Roll was arraigned before the Honorable Magistrate Jennifer Huebel, of the81st District Court, Tawas, Michigan.

He was released on a $5,000.00 personal bond.

Officer Roll is currently suspended with pay for “Assault and Battery/Domestic Violence,” in which he was dismissed from the Detroit Police Department at a Chief’s Hearing. He is currently appealing this decision. Additionally, on July 31, 2002, a Probationary Evaluation Board recommended that he be dismissed from the department due to poor work performance and attendance.

Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Officer Roll be charged with, but not limited to the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:









Deputy Kevin Chittick - Lapeer SD

Also See:

Deputy Kevin Chittick charged with CSC






















































Wednesday, May 1, 2002

Trooper Bart Cunningham - Kalkaska Post


Trooper Bart Cunningham: Charged with fourth degree criminal sexual conduct [MAY 2002]


"Bart Cunningham enlisted as a state police trooper in 1996, but resigned in 2004 while assigned to the Kalkaska post....
...In 2002, Kalkaska police arrested Cunningham on a high-court misdemeanor of fourth-degree criminal-sexual conduct, state police records show. He pled guilty in 2003 to assault and battery and attempted fourth-degree criminal-sexual conduct, and was sentenced to 18 months on probation...."
[The Grand Rapids Press].



SEE ALSO:
FORMER STATE TROOPER BART CUNNINGHAM CHARGED WITH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE [DECEMBER2007]:

http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2007/12/former-trooper-bart-cunningham-kalkaska.html

FORMER STATE TROOPER BART CUNNINGHAM SHOOTS WIFE AND STEP-SON AND THEN COMMITS SUICIDE [FEBRUARY 26, 2010]:
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2010/02/former-state-trooper-bart-cunningham.html












TROOPER BART CUNNINGHAM: MICHIGAN SEX OFFENDER REGISTRY
Registered Offender List
FAMILY WATCHDOG WEBSITE

http://www.familywatchdog.us/ShowNameList.asp
Search Criteria: Cunningham, Bart, MI
Name: Bart Fredrick Cunningham
Type: State Registry
Address: 418 Baldie StIonia, MI 48846 MI
Attempted Criminal Sexual Conduct 4th Degree(Force Or Coercion)
Conviction Date: 1/1/1900









Trooper can avoid jail if he obeysApril 8, 2003
By DAN SANDERSON
Traverse City Record-Eagle staff writer
http://archives.record-eagle.com/2003/apr/08troop.htm

GRAYLING - A Michigan State Police trooper who assaulted a woman and groped two others at a Kalkaska bar will stay out of jail if he completes counseling and avoids alcohol.

Bart Frederick Cunningham, 30, was sentenced by Chief 46th Circuit Court Judge Alton T. Davis to 90 days in jail Monday for assault and battery and attempted fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct.

Davis, however, said he would suspend the sentence if Cunningham completes sentencing conditions while he is on probation for a year and half.


"I'm sorry for the entire event," Cunningham told the court. "I wish I could go back and change my actions and decisions from this incident. Unfortunately, I cannot."

Cunningham pleaded guilty to the two charges in January.

The charges stem from a fight that occurred outside the Cedar Street Pub in May between Cunningham and a 49-year-old woman, who complained of minor injuries to her face and chest. Kalkaska police officers said that Cunningham also inappropriately touched a 32-year-old woman and groped a 39-year-old woman.

Davis ordered Cunningham to avoid alcohol and submit to alcohol tests as well as attend domestic violence counseling. Cunningham also will have to register as a sex offender on the registry maintained by the Michigan State Police.

"If you don't get straightened out, you are going to have a lot more problems as you go forward," Davis told Cunningham.

Cunningham is expected to be fired later this week after 10 years as a trooper. He was suspended without pay following his arrest.

The prosecution was handled by Grand Traverse County Assistant Prosecutor Noelle Moeggenberg because Cunningham had been a witness for Kalkaska County Prosecutor Brian Donnelly in other cases.

The 46th Trial Court covers Crawford, Kalkaska and Otsego Counties










Police say Ionia teen was on phone with 911 as former Michigan state trooper shot stepson, her mother, himselfBy Barton Deiters The Grand Rapids Press
February 26, 2010, 8:00PM
http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2010/02/police_say_ionia_teen_was_on_p.html



A body is removed Friday from an Ionia on Baldie Street where police say a mother and son were shot by a former state police trooper. Police say the shooter killed himself in the home. [Rex Larsen. The Grand Rapids Press]



IONIA -- In the little city of Ionia, the Cunningham family has long been a well-known part of the community.

But inside their tidy white house early Friday, authorities say a domestic nightmare played out.

While a 13-year-old girl hid in a bedroom, she relayed to emergency dispatchers the deadly events she could hear transpiring beyond her locked door.



FORMER TROOPER BART CUNNINGHAM


Police say Bart Cunningham, 37, a former state police trooper, shot and injured his stepson, 16-year-old Joshua Snyder, and the teen's mother, 42-year-old Wendy Cunningham. Bart Cunningham then fatally turned the gun on himself, police said.

Authorities were alerted to the incident about 4:30 a.m., when Joshua's younger sister inside the home called police.

She helped provide information for members of an Ionia County tactical team, which took about an hour before entering the home at 418 Baldie St., said David Bulling, director of the Ionia Department of Public Safety.

In the house, police found Bart Cunningham dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, and the mother and son suffering from multiple gunshot wounds. Police say two guns were likely involved.

Ionia shooting press conference
Wendy Cunningham and her son were taken by helicopter to Spectrum Health Butterworth Hospital.

They were listed in serious condition.

The incident started as a domestic dispute, police said.



Barb Lower, 83, lives near the home where the shooting occurred. [Rex Larsen The Grand Rapids Press]


Barb Lower, 83, who lives across the street from the Cunninghams, said she would see their children playing and riding skateboards. "It's shocking, especially in a neighborhood like this," said Lower, who has lived in the house for more than 50 years.

Bart Cunningham enlisted as a state police trooper in 1996, but resigned in 2004 while assigned to the Kalkaska post.

In 2002, Kalkaska police arrested Cunningham on a high-court misdemeanor of fourth-degree criminal-sexual conduct, state police records show. He pled guilty in 2003 to assault and battery and attempted fourth-degree criminal-sexual conduct, and was sentenced to 18 months on probation.

In late December 2007, he was arrested in Ionia for domestic violence. He was sentenced to 12 days in jail, and 12 months on probation.


Court records show Wendy Cunningham also has had recent brushes with the law.

Wendy Cunningham had a 2004 conviction for domestic violence, and 2008 conviction for allowing alcohol or drug consumption by minors. Records showed she was arrested last year for using false or forged prescriptions to obtain controlled substances.

Early Friday, police called Ionia Public Schools leaders, letting them know what had happened, according to Ben Kirby, an assistant superintendent.

The schools on Friday tried to help students and teachers who know the teens involved, and also to stem the tide of speculation that flooded student cell phones, which are supposed to be kept in lockers.

Kirby said counselors will remain in place Monday and that the two students are long-time members of the school community.

"There is quite a connection in the community with that family," said Kirby. "The kids are well-known and well-respected among students and teachers, as well."









Former MSP trooper shoots 2, kills self
Everybody is related
Updated: Friday, 26 Feb 2010, 6:14 PM EST
Published : Friday, 26 Feb 2010, 7:05 AM EST
By Tony Tagliavia
http://www.woodtv.com/dpp/news/local/central_mich/shooting-in-ionia

IONIA, Mich. (WOOD) - Investigators identified Bart Cunningham, 37, Friday afternoon as the man who shot two relatives at their Ionia home early Friday morning before committing suicide.

Cunnningham's wife, 42-year-old Wendy Cunningham, and her 16-year-old son were shot multiple times but are expected to live Ionia Public Safety Director David Bulling said Friday afternoon.

Bulling said the incident was the result of a domestic situation, but did not release further details.

Bart Cunningham was a former Michigan State Police trooper, a department spokeswoman told 24 Hour News 8. He had served only at the Kalkaska Post and resigned in 2004, she said.

The 37-year-old has a fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct conviction on his record, tied to a May 2002 incident.

A jury convicted him on a charge of domestic violence against Wendy Cunningham based on a December 2007 incident.

Court records of the 2007 incident obtained by 24 Hour News 8 show Wendy Cunningham called police claiming to have been assaulted,but officers testified they did not find any evidence of injury. In court, Wendy Cunningham said he grabbed at her hand but she did not remember much of the incident. Bart Cunningham testified that he tried to grab his wife's purse and she hit him back.


Public safety officers were first called to the home in the 400 block of Baldie Street east of downtown Ionia around 4:30 a.m.

"Once officers were on scene, they were able to make contact with a 13-year-old that was still in the home," Bulling said Friday morning. The 13-year-old was Bart and Wendy Cunningham's daughter, investigators said, and was not hurt in the incidents. She is now staying with other relatives, they said.

Roughly 50 minutes later, the county's critical incident team -- made up of public safety officers and sheriff's department personnel -- entered the home, Bulling said. Investigators found "one deceased individual," he said. "At this time, the initial investigation has shown that person to be the shooter."

The two victims had multiple gunshot wounds and were taken from the scene by air, he said.

The Michigan State Police crime lab was called to the scene to investigate.

Some streets in the area were closed for a time and nearby Saints Peter and Paul school, which served as a staging area for police, canceled school Friday.