Friday, December 19, 2003

Commissioner Roland Fraschetti - Macomb County

Also See:

Commissioner Roland Fraschetti - Car collision during domestic



Macomb County official to undergo counseling
Detroit Free Press
December 23, 2003
BY ALEXA CAPELOTO
http://www.freep.com/news/locmac/comm23_20031223.htm

A Macomb County commissioner is to spend 30 weeks in domestic violence counseling under a plea deal stemming from a June confrontation with his girlfriend that ended in a car collision.

Roland Fraschetti, a St. Clair Shores Republican, pleaded guilty Friday to reckless driving, a 90-day misdemeanor. The charge will be reduced to careless driving, a civil infraction, if he successfully completes the counseling.

Fraschetti was accused of backing his SUV into his girlfriend's Saturn sedan with such force that it rolled onto the hood of the smaller car. The two had just argued and were in the driveway of a St. Clair Shores home owned by Fraschetti. No one was seriously injured.

"The victim didn't want me to charge him at all," said Joseph McCarthy Jr. of the St. Clair County Prosecutor's Office, which handled the case because of Fraschetti's position in Macomb County. "I told her I have to do something to make sure this doesn't happen again."

A judge will take Fraschetti's guilty plea under advisement while the commissioner attends weekly group counseling sessions run by Catholic Social Services of St. Clair County. Any failure to finish the program could result in a reckless driving conviction.

Sebastian Lucido, Fraschetti's attorney, said his client considers the deal a proper end to what essentially was a car accident. "They got into an argument and it got heated, but he never laid a finger on her," Lucido said. "The man does not have a violent bone in his body."

What really happened, Lucido said, is that "she was in a car behind him and just pulled up. When he hit the car, he was at fault."

With the careless driving infraction, Fraschetti faces three points on his driving record and a $100 fine. He must also pay $750 for the counseling program, which is the same one Commissioner Kurt Kramer was ordered into after pleading no contest to assaulting his wife in June.
Contact ALEXA CAPELOTO at 586-469-4935 or capeloto@freepress.com.


[MI POLICE OFFICER INVOLVED PERPETRATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LAW ENFORCEMENT MURDER SUICIDE]

Thursday, December 11, 2003

Firefighter Gerald Paul Thoma Jr. - Sentenced - Fruitport FD

Also See:

Firefighter Gerald Paul Thoma Jr. charged with domestic violence [June 02, 2007]













Fire Captain Gerald Paul Thoma Jr. [Fruitport Township FD]

Original Charges:  Charged with felony malicious destruction of a building. June 2003.

Sentence: Plea bargain. Pleaded no contest to two misdemeanors: operating a vehicle while impaired and malicious destruction of property causing $200 or more in damages stemming from that incident. He was sentenced to 45 days in the county jail and 24 months of probation

Reprimand from City of Fruitport/ FD: Placed on a 30-day unpaid suspension and had to sign a "last chance agreement" to keep his job. The agreement indicated Thoma couldn't use illegal substances or alcohol or become involved in any criminal activities for the "lifetime of his career" at the Fruitport Township Fire Department.







Fire captain again faces a criminal charge
Muskegon Chronicle
By Heather L. VanDyke hvandyke@...
Friday, August 03, 2007
http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-12/1186155959184030.xml&coll=8

A Fruitport Township fire captain with a criminal record has been charged with domestic assault for allegedly punching his 16-year-old son.

Gerald Paul Thoma Jr., 43, was charged with the misdemeanor stemming from a June 2 incident in which he is accused of punching his son in the face during an argument.

Fire Chief Ken Doctor said Thursday that Thoma, who has been on the department for more than 20 years, is not suspended from his job and will continue to work as a fire captain on a full-time basis "for now." He declined further comment.

According to the police report, Thoma and his son got into an argument just before 11 p.m. that escalated into an alleged assault at their home at 3148 E. Pontaluna. The argument apparently was over whether the son could go to a skate park with friends, said Police Chief Paul Smutz.

Thoma's wife, Geraldine Thoma, told police she was at the home when the incident occurred but did not witness it, Smutz said. The son called 911.

The veteran fire captain -- who is 6 feet 1 inch tall, and weighs 230 pounds -- is accused of punching the teen in the nose three times, Smutz said. When officers arrived at the scene, "they saw blood coming from (the son's) nose, and it was swollen," Smutz said.

Township Supervisor Ron Cooper said Thoma's job is not in jeopardy at this time because he is "not convicted of anything.""If he is found to be guilty, then that could have an effect on his job," Cooper said. "I don't see why we would take a man's job away from him because he's been accused of something."

Cooper said he had not read the police report."It's an accusation," he said of the punching allegations. "The kid may have fallen on the floor, for all I know. It's a domestic thing. It's a discipline thing."It was not clear whether the teen indicated he wanted to press charges against his father, but in domestic assault cases, if there is physical evidence to support it "an arrest has to happen," Smutz said.

Thoma was arrested and lodged the same night in the Muskegon County Jail. A jury trial is slated for 9 a.m. Aug. 20 in 14th Circuit Court.

Thoma's June 2 arrest came about four years after his last run-in with the law.

In June 2003, Thoma was charged with a five-year felony for malicious destruction of a building causing more than $1,000 in damages.

Connie Smith, who was township supervisor at the time, did not take the incident lightly. Thoma was placed on a 30-day unpaid suspension and had to sign a "last chance agreement" to keep his job.

The agreement indicated Thoma couldn't use illegal substances or alcohol or become involved in any criminal activities for the "lifetime of his career" at the Fruitport Township Fire Department. It also required Thoma to continue a substance abuse treatment program he began after the June 14, 2003, incident. Cooper said he has looked at that agreement, but other township officials agreed no action should be taken at this time.

Thoma was arrested for ramming his Dodge truck into an acquaintance's house at 1479 S. Mill Iron in Muskegon Township. He also rammed the acquaintance's vehicle that night and returned to the same home days later to offer the victim money to "settle the matter" to reduce his criminal charge, police said.

Thoma pleaded no contest to two misdemeanors: operating a vehicle while impaired and malicious destruction of property causing $200 or more in damages stemming from that incident.

He was sentenced to 45 days in the county jail and 24 months of probation and was ordered to pay court costs and fines.

Wednesday, December 3, 2003

C.O. Ronald Mielcarek - Buena Vista




On December 03, 2003, Buena Vista State Corrections Officer Ronald Mielcarek shot and wounded his wife. Mielcarek was charged with assault with intent to commit murder and possessing a firearm while committing a felony.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mielcarek's mistress claimed that Mielcarek had vowed to kill his wife with a hammer...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
....Or set her house on fire with her inside....










....And that he mentioned getting members of a motorcycle gang to slay her.











































































Former corrections officer gets 10 to 20 in shooting
Saginaw News (MI)
February 22, 2006
Author: DARRYL Q. TUCKER

A former state corrections officer has received punishment for trying to kill his wife.Ronald S. Mielcarek, 35, learned Monday that he will spend the next 10 to 20 years in prison for assault with intent to murder Danelle I. Hoffman. A jury convicted Mielcarek.

After the hearing, Hoffman said she is "pleased with the sentence" and glad the case is over.

During the proceeding, Mielcarek turned to Hoffman and apologized to her. He said what he did "was unacceptable" and it "was truly out of character for me."

Mielcarek, who said he had consumed alcohol the night of the incident, argued through his attorney that his offense was more consistent with felonious assault and that he should serve only three to 10 years in prison.

In June, a jury convicted Mielcarek of possessing a firearm while committing a felony against Hoffman but deadlocked on whether he tried to kill her in their Freeland home in December 2003 after accusing her of having an affair with one of her co-workers.

About 5 a.m. Dec. 3, Mielcarek came home and argued with his wife, prosecutors said. He took a gun, pointed it at her head and fired, shooting off part of her ear.

Hoffman fled, and sheriff's deputies arrived a short time later.

Mielcarek worked at the Buena Vista Corrections Center, 1835 Treanor in Buena Vista Township. Administrators there suspended him the day he faced criminal charges, and the Department of Corrections later fired Mielcarek. He also said he had worked as a respiratory therapist at Gratiot Community Hospital.





Jury: Guilty of assaulting wife
Saginaw News (MI)
January 12, 2006
Author: DARRYL Q. TUCKER

A former state corrections officer already serving a prison term on a weapons charge involving his wife now is convicted of trying to kill her.

Ronald S. Mielcarek, 35, was in Saginaw County Circuit Court on Wednesday when a jury of eight men and four women found him guilty of assault with intent to murder Danelle I. Hoffman.

Jurors deliberated for about 31Ú2 hours.

Mielcarek, who is serving two years in prison for possessing a firearm while committing a felony, will receive his sentence Tuesday, Feb. 21. He faces life behind bars.

In June, a jury deadlocked on whether Mielcarek tried to kill Hoffman in their Freeland home in December 2003 after accusing her of having an affair with one of her co-workers.

About 5 a.m. Dec. 3, Mielcarek came home and argued with his wife, authorities said. He took a gun, pointed it at her head and fired, shooting off part of her ear, they said.

Hoffman fled the house, and sheriff's deputies arrived a short time later.

Mielcarek worked at the Buena Vista Corrections Center, 1835 Treanor in Buena Vista Township. Administrators there suspended him the day he faced criminal charges, and the Department of Corrections later fired Mielcarek.










Former officer going to prison
Saginaw News (MI)
August 16, 2005
Author: DARRYL Q. TUCKER

A former state corrections officer is headed to prison for a weapons charge involving his wife.

Ronald S. Mielcarek, 35, is serving a two-year sentence for possessing a firearm while committing a felony.

During Monday's hearing, Saginaw County Circuit Judge Robert L. Kaczmarek gave Mielcarek credit for 535 days he served in jail while awaiting trial. The judge also ordered Mielcarek to pay $120 in fees and fines.

In June, a jury deadlocked on whether Mielcarek tried to kill his wife, Danelle I. Hoffman, in their Freeland home in December 2003 after accusing her of having an affair with one of her co-workers.

Prosecutors have said they will again try Mielcarek on a charge of assault with intent to commit murder. Court officials have not set the date for Mielcarek's retrial.

About 5 a.m. Dec. 3, Mielcarek came home and argued with his wife, prosecutors said. He took a gun, pointed it at her head and fired, shooting off part of her ear, they said.

Hoffman fled the house and a short time later, sheriff's deputies arrived.

Mielcarek worked at the Buena Vista Corrections Center, 1835 Treanor in Buena Vista Township. Administrators suspended him the day he faced criminal charges. A Department of Corrections spokeswoman said Mielcarek is not an active state employee.









Corrections officer convicted on gun charge
Saginaw News (MI)
June 28, 2005

A jury deadlocked Monday on whether a state corrections officer tried to kill his wife in their Freeland home in December 2003 after accusing her of having an affair with one of her co-workers.

However, the jury of four men and eight women did convict Ronald S. Mielcarek of having a gun during the incident with his wife, Danelle I. Hoffman.

Saginaw County Circuit Judge Robert L. Kaczmarek will sentence Mielcarek, 35, on Monday, Aug. 15, to the mandatory sentence of two years in prison for possessing a firearm while committing a felony.Court officials have not set the date for Mielcarek's retrial.

About 5 a.m. Dec. 3, Mielcarek came home and argued with his wife, prosecutors said. He took a gun, pointed it at her head and fired, shooting off part of her ear, they said.

Mielcarek is in jail on a $50,000 cash or surety bond.









He accuses wife of affair, talks to his mistress about it
Saginaw News (MI)
June 23, 2005
Author: DARRYL Q. TUCKER
The Saginaw News

A state corrections officer tried to kill his wife in their Freeland home in December 2003 after accusing her of having an affair with one of her co-workers, a prosecutor says.

Ronald S. Mielcarek arrived home about 5 a.m. Dec. 3 and argued with his wife, Danelle I. Hoffman, Saginaw County Assistant Prosecutor Jeffrey D. Stroud told a jury of eight men and six women during Mielcarek's trial.

"He took a gun, pointed it at her head and fired, taking a portion of her ear off," Stroud said.

Mielcarek then chased his wife, now 29, down the stairs and fired another shot, he said.

"She got out of the house," Stroud said. "She survived."

After the incident, Mielcarek, 35, drove to the home of a woman with whom he was having an extramarital affair and told her what happened, Stroud said.

The Saginaw resident faces charges of assault with intent to commit murder and possessing a firearm while committing a felony.

Defense attorney James F. Gust told jurors his client fired the shots but wasn't trying to kill his wife. The couple was married for two years before they divorced.

Mielcarek worked at the Buena Vista Corrections Center, 1835 Treanor in Buena Vista Township, before administrators suspended him the day he faced criminal charges. A Department of Corrections spokeswoman said Mielcarek is not an active state employee.

He is in jail on a $50,000 cash or surety bond.

On Dec. 2, Mielcarek called his wife, a Delphi Corp. employee, and told her he was going out with friends, which upset her, Stroud said. Hoffman got off work, bought a six-pack of beer and drove home.

She drank five of the six beers and fell asleep, he said. About 5 a.m., Mielcarek came into the house and began screaming at her.

Mielcarek accused Hoffman of having an affair, which she denied, Stroud said.

"He had a .380 semiautomatic pistol pointed right at her," the prosecutor said.

Hoffman began dialing 911 while telling Mielcarek to put the gun down, Stroud said. When she raised the phone to her ear, he fired.

"The bullet goes through the phone, shattering the phone," which took a chunk off her ear, Stroud said.

With the destroyed phone in her hand, Hoffman fled the bedroom, went downstairs to the kitchen and got another phone, he said. As she neared the front door, Mielcarek fired another shot, Stroud said.

A hysterical Hoffman told 911 dispatchers what happened, Stroud said. She also ran to neighbors' homes and pounded on doors, but no one came out, Stroud said.

A short time later, a sheriff's deputy arrived.

Later in the day, police found Mielcarek at the home of his mistress and arrested him, Stroud said.

The woman at first denied knowledge of the incident but later said Mielcarek told her he believed he had killed his wife when he shot at her, Stroud said.

The other woman will testify that Mielcarek had vowed to kill his wife with a hammer or set her house on fire with her inside, and that he mentioned getting members of a motorcycle gang to slay her, Stroud said.

Prosecutors won't succeed in proving that Mielcarek tried to kill Hoffman, Gust said. Mielcarek had an alcohol problem, and he and his wife had fought verbally, the attorney said.

"There will be no evidence he ever assaulted her on prior occasions," Gust said.

Both Mielcarek and Hoffman were intoxicated the morning of the shooting, Gust said.

"It was a pretty stupid thing for him to do," he said. "We're not saying he didn't do anything wrong; we are saying he didn't intend to kill his wife."

He could have killed her if he wanted to, but he didn't."













Corrections officer charged Saginaw News
December 6, 2003
DARRYL Q. TUCKER
The wife of a state corrections officer says she feared for her life when her husband jostled her from her sleep and shot at her twice, leaving her with superficial wounds, court papers indicate.

In a personal protection order request, Danelle I. Mielcarek, 28, wrote that her husband, Ronald S. Mielcarek, arrived at their Freeland home from work about 5:30 a.m. Wednesday and demanded to know about an affair that was not taking place, the document says.

Ronald Mielcarek is a corrections officer at the Buena Vista Corrections Center, 1835 Treanor in Buena Vista Township.

"He pulled his gun on me and shot at me twice; once shooting the phone when I was holding it to my head and once on my way to running out the door, grazing my left ear," the papers say. "I would not be here today if those bullets were on target. I fear that I might not be as lucky next time."

Mielcarek said she fled the home and hid in the neighborhood until deputies arrived. Police arrested Ronald Mielcarek at a home in Carrollton Township about two hours after the shooting.

Doctors at Covenant HealthCare treated Danelle Mielcarek for wounds to her ear and nose and released her.

A Saginaw County Sheriff's report indicated that deputies found a hole in a phone at the couple's house and hair hanging from the hole that Danelle Mielcarek said the bullet made.

Saginaw County Probate Judge Patrick J. McGraw granted Danelle Mielcarek the protection request in effect until Jan. 4, 2006. The order also means that Ronald Mielcarek must not visit his wife's parents' home in Saginaw.

A violation could result in 93 days in jail and $500 in fines.Meanwhile, Ronald Mielcarek, 33, faces charges of assault with intent to commit murder and possessing a firearm while committing a felony.

Prosecutors will present evidence to District Judge M. Randall Jurrens, who will determine whether Ronald Mielcarek should stand trial in Circuit Court. A conviction could lead to a sentence of up to life in prison, with the possibility of parole.

Ronald Mielcarek is free on a $50,000 cash bond.



Michigan Officer Involved Domestic Violence

Monday, November 10, 2003

Officer David Gronin - Reinstated - Southgate PD

Also See:

Officer David Gronin convicted of domestic violence




Officer reinstated to job
November 12, 2003
By Andrea Blum,
The News-Herald
http://www.thenewsherald.com/stories/111203/loc_20031112078.shtml

SOUTHGATE -- A former police officer is back on the force.

David Grondin resumed his duties as a police officer after winning an arbitration dispute with the city.

He was fired from the department March 27 after working there for three years. Grondin was let go for insubordination stemming from several department issues, in addition to a domestic assault involving his ex-wife and another man, police said.

The union asked to take the matter to arbitration. The three-day hearing wrapped up Friday, with Grondin getting his job back on a probationary period.

"It was a negotiated settlement between the union and the city," Police Chief Larry Hall said. "He has been reassigned to a shift and is returning to work."

Grondin maintained that he was fired unfairly and fought to return to his job. "I'm happy to be back and to be given a second chance," he said.

The settlement reinstates Grondin without any back pay or back benefits. It also places him on probation for another year.

"With the grievant wanting to come back to work in the city, it was decided that a year off without pay was a significant sanction," City Attorney Wallace Long said. "The city is agreeing to go forward on this trial basis with him being on probation."

Arbitrator Mario Chiesa helped the two sides negotiate. "Discussions ranged all over the place as to what had occurred," Long added. "It's fair to say that after a long and healthy airing of all the issues surrounding his conduct, both parties thought it was in the best interest to resolve it in this fashion."










Police beat

Published: Sunday, May 25, 2003
The News-Herald
http://www.thenewsherald.com/articles/2003/05/25/police/20030525-archive0.txt?viewmode=fullstory

Former officer gets probation in assault

SOUTHGATE - A former city police officer was sentenced May 15 on two assault charges.

David Grondin will spend a year on probation for an altercation with his ex-wife and another man in November.

Grondin, 29, also must attend classes on anger management and domestic violence as a result of the incident, as well as pay a $1,000 fine.

He is allowed no contact with the two others involved or their families.

If he meets all of those conditions, after a year the charges will be expunged from his record, as he is a first-time offender.

He pleaded no contest to both counts during a trial May 1 in 27th District Court, Division I, in Wyandotte.

Grondin was arrested by Riverview police inside the Southgate Police Department on Nov. 15 and charged with one count of domestic assault and one count of assault and battery.

He was fired from the department March 27 after working there for three years.

Since then, he has sought employment with the reservation police in Sault Ste. Marie.

A circuit court order prohibits Grondin from carrying a gun, but he is challenging that order.

Grondin was fired due to several internal department issues, according to Police Chief Larry Hall, in addition to the assault incident.

The union has asked to take the matter to arbitration.

"Its not a case where the arbitrator would exonerate him," Hall said. "They will look at if the action of the city was proportionate and equitable given the charges."

He said the matter likely wouldnt go to arbitration sooner than November.



Wednesday, October 22, 2003

Assist Prosector Kevin Floyd - Kent County








Kent County Prosecutor Kevin Floyd was charged with misdemeanor assault and battery and aggravated stalking for a May 23, 2003 altercation with his ex-wife. Floyd was placed on pretrial release, pending trial.












In October 2003, Assistant Prosector Floyd was jailed for one week.










Upon his release from jail [October 29, 2003], Assistant Prosecutor Floyd was fitted with an electronic tether.









ALSO SEE:

Kent County Assistant Prosecutor Kevin Floyd. May 23, 2007: Assault and battery; aggravated stalking charges.
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2003/10/october-22-2003-assistant-prosecutor.html


Kent County Assistant Prosecutor Kevin Floyd. February 27, 2004: Pretrial release revocation hearing for failure to pay electronic tether fees.
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2004/02/assistant-prosecutor-kevin-floyd-kent.html


Kent County Assistant Prosecutor Kevin Floyd. July 12, 2005: Violation of probation.
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2005/07/assistant-prosecutor-kevin-floyd-kent.html


Kent County Assistant Prosecutor Kevin Floyd. December 30, 2005: Criminal contempt in civil case / divorce case.
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2005/12/assistant-prosecutor-kevin-floyd-kent.html


Kent County Assistant Prosecutor Kevin Floyd. August 21, 2006: 30 day suspension ordered by State of Michigan Attorney Discipline Board for Floyd's assault and battery conviction.
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2006/08/assistant-prosecutor-kevin-floyd-kent.html


Kent County Assistant Prosecutor Kevin Floyd. May 31, 2007: Attempted to appeal May 10, 2007, parenting time ruling.
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2007/05/assistant-prosecutor-kevin-floyd-kent.html











PAGE #1 OF STATE OF MICHIGAN ATTORNEY DISCIPLINE BOARD AUGUST 21, 2006 RULING: "At sentencing, on October 29, 2004, respondent was sentenced to 30 days in jail with credit for 16 days served.












New procedures will make sure tethers are turned on
Saturday, February 28, 2004
By Doug Guthrie
The Grand Rapids Press
http://www.mlive.com/news/grpress/index.ssf?/base/news-13/107796711258720.xml

New policies are in place to prevent the same shutdown of an electronic tracking tether that occurred when a former Kent County assistant prosecutor -- accused of stalking his estranged wife -- failed to pay required maintenance fees.

The global positioning satellite tracking device that one-time judicial candidate Kevin Floyd was required to wear was ordered shut off Feb. 2 for failure to pay maintenance fees to a Detroit-area electronic surveillance company. It was reactivated two days later.

"It would be bad to have someone get off a tether by just not paying for it," said Kent County Chief Circuit Judge Paul Sullivan. "It's the height of absurdity to have had this happen. From a policy standpoint, this should never happen again."

The county contracts with a leasing company called House Arrest Services for the ankle-attached tracking equipment.

Floyd had been ordered to pay $16 a day for the device. Other tethers in common use are half as expensive.

Court records show Floyd made only an initial payment when he was released from jail and fitted with the device on Oct. 29. Floyd, who resigned from his nearly $90,000-a-year job after 14 years with the Kent County Prosecutor's office, had argued he didn't have the money to pay.

He quit after being charged with aggravated stalking for violating a personal protection order obtained by his estranged wife, Andrea Morgan-Floyd.

The device allows people accused of potentially violent crimes to remain free on bond while awaiting trial.

Unlike standard electronic tethers which warn authorities if a person has left home, the GPS tether sends a signal to a receiver in the hands of the alleged victim, warning that the accused is nearby.

Authorities have said Floyd apparently was unaware that his tether was turned off, until notified by the court after it was turned back on. Floyd avoided returning to jail on Friday when he paid nearly $1,300 in overdue maintenance fees. He also paid an additional $500 for the service through March, according to his lawyer, John Beason.

Sullivan said the Floyd case was unique because it apparently is the only time a GPS tether has been turned off without a judge's order.

Sullivan said there now are procedures in place to ensure failure to pay is addressed in court before any services are turned off.

Jon Ugval, director of operations for House Arrest Services of Eastpointe, near Detroit, said his company turned off the device on orders issued from within the Kent County court's bureaucracy.

"We have never taken them off line without a court's approval," Ugval said. "It was not a House Arrest Services call. All we do is provide information for the court. Decisions are made at that level."

Sullivan said the GPS device rarely has been used in the nearly three years it has been available. He said higher cost is a factor, but the other alternative is to put the person in jail. Given the option, many defendants prefer to pay rather than go to jail, he said.


Floyd, 40, has been free on $40,000 bond since his release after a week in jail in October.

A Kalamazoo County judge assigned to the case last week gave Floyd until noon Friday to pay or go to jail.

"The judge (Kalamazoo Circuit Judge Philip D. Schaefer) was fair and reasonable in giving Kevin a chance to pay," Beason said. "We also appreciate the judge's lifting of a restriction preventing Kevin from seeing his son. The judge was fatherly and compassionate."

Schaefer is handling the case because Kent County's judges declined due to familiarity with Floyd. Kent County's prosecutor also backed away from the case for the same reason.

No date has been set for Floyd's trial. The crime is punishable by up to five years in prison, $7,500 in fines and at least five years of probation. Misdemeanor assault charges also stemming from another alleged domestic incident were dismissed in Kentwood District Court in January.

Thursday, September 25, 2003

Officer Elgin Murphy - Suspended - Detroit PD



On September 25, 2003, Detroit PD Sergeant Elgin Murphy was charged with assaulting his step-son. According to the police report, Murphy slammed his step-son up against the wall; choked him and punched him in the face and ribs.
Officer Murphy was suspended from the department on September 25th.








BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS
Minutes of the Board of Police Commissioners Meeting
Thursday, September 25, 2003
The regular meeting of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners was held on
Thursday, September 25, 2003, at 3:00 p.m., at the Police Headquarters, 1300
Beaubien, Room 328-A, Detroit, MI 48226.

4. SECRETARY REPORT – EXEC. DIR. GOSS
Suspension. On September 25, 2003, Sergeant Elgin Murphy, badge S-810, assigned to the Office of the Chief Investigator, was suspended without pay by Chief Jerry A. Oliver, Sr.

On August 12, 2003, the Professional Accountability Bureau was notified of an alleged act of misconduct on the part of Sgt. Murphy. More specifically, it was alleged that while off-duty, Sgt. Murphy did slam his seventeen (17) year old stepson against the wall, choke him, and punch him multiple times about the face and rib area.

According to the Preliminary Complaint Records, the following occurred:
On August 6, 2003, at approximately 9:30 p.m., Sgt. Murphy’s stepson was in his bedroom, located at his residence within the city of Detroit, when Sgt. Murphy entered the bedroom and questioned him regarding food therein. After the conversation, Sgt. Murphy slammed his stepson against the wall, choked him, punched him on the right side of his face and punched him several times in the ribs with a closed fist. Sgt. Murphy’s stepson was subsequently treated at Botsford General Hospital Emergency room and diagnosed with a ruptured right eardrum.

On August 13, 2003, felony/misdemeanor warrant #03-63978 was issued charging Sgt. Murphy with “Second Degree Child Abuse, Aggravated Domestic Violence and Domestic Violence.”

On August 18, 2003, Sgt. Murphy was arraigned in 36th District Court before Magistrate Steven Lockhart. He stood mute and a plea of not guilty was entered on his behalf. He was released on a $50,000.00 personal bond with a no contact provision with the complainant. His preliminary examination was scheduled for August 28, 2003, however it has been adjourned to October 2, 2003.

Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Sgt. Murphy be charged with, but not limited to, the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:
CHARGE: CONDUCT, UNPROFESSIONAL/CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER; CONTRARY TO THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CODE OF ETHICS, THIS BEING IN
VIOLATION OF DETROIT POLICE MANUAL SERIES 102.3-5.7, SECTION 3.
Exec. Dir. Goss asked if there were any Attorneys present on behalf of Sgt. Murphy?
Unless contravened by this Commission, the above suspension without pay will stand.


[MI POLICE OFFICER INVOLVED PERPETRATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LAW ENFORCEMENT MURDER SUICIDE]

Officer Elgin Murphy - Detroit PD



On September 25, 2003, Detroit PD Sergeant Elgin Murphy was charged with assaulting his step-son. According to the police report, Murphy slammed his step-son up against the wall; choked him and punched him in the face and ribs.








BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS
Minutes of the Board of Police Commissioners Meeting
Thursday, September 25, 2003
The regular meeting of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners was held on
Thursday, September 25, 2003, at 3:00 p.m., at the Police Headquarters, 1300
Beaubien, Room 328-A, Detroit, MI 48226.

4. SECRETARY REPORT – EXEC. DIR. GOSS
Suspension. On September 25, 2003, Sergeant Elgin Murphy, badge S-810, assigned to the Office of the Chief Investigator, was suspended without pay by Chief Jerry A. Oliver, Sr.

On August 12, 2003, the Professional Accountability Bureau was notified of an alleged act of misconduct on the part of Sgt. Murphy. More specifically, it was alleged that while off-duty, Sgt. Murphy did slam his seventeen (17) year old stepson against the wall, choke him, and punch him multiple times about the face and rib area.

According to the Preliminary Complaint Records, the following occurred:
On August 6, 2003, at approximately 9:30 p.m., Sgt. Murphy’s stepson was in his bedroom, located at his residence within the city of Detroit, when Sgt. Murphy entered the bedroom and questioned him regarding food therein. After the conversation, Sgt. Murphy slammed his stepson against the wall, choked him, punched him on the right side of his face and punched him several times in the ribs with a closed fist. Sgt. Murphy’s stepson was subsequently treated at Botsford General Hospital Emergency room and diagnosed with a ruptured right eardrum.

On August 13, 2003, felony/misdemeanor warrant #03-63978 was issued charging Sgt. Murphy with “Second Degree Child Abuse, Aggravated Domestic Violence and Domestic Violence.”

On August 18, 2003, Sgt. Murphy was arraigned in 36th District Court before Magistrate Steven Lockhart. He stood mute and a plea of not guilty was entered on his behalf. He was released on a $50,000.00 personal bond with a no contact provision with the complainant. His preliminary examination was scheduled for August 28, 2003, however it has been adjourned to October 2, 2003.

Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Sgt. Murphy be charged with, but not limited to, the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:
CHARGE: CONDUCT, UNPROFESSIONAL/CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER; CONTRARY TO THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CODE OF ETHICS, THIS BEING IN
VIOLATION OF DETROIT POLICE MANUAL SERIES 102.3-5.7, SECTION 3.
Exec. Dir. Goss asked if there were any Attorneys present on behalf of Sgt. Murphy?
Unless contravened by this Commission, the above suspension without pay will stand.


[MI POLICE OFFICER INVOLVED PERPETRATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LAW ENFORCEMENT MURDER SUICIDE]

Wednesday, September 3, 2003

Officer John M. Smith - Terminated - Flint PD

Also See:

Officer John M. Smith - domestic violence





Charges latest blow to cops' image
From Flint Journal files
Oct. 4, 2005
http://blog.mlive.com/flintjournal/2008/07/flint_journal_files_articles_related_to_antonio_barber.html

FLINT, Michigan - Two Flint police officers accused of stealing money and drugs are the latest but not the first to tarnish the department's reputation.

In recent years, Flint officers have been accused of soliciting sex on the job, stealing a video game and beating a handcuffed man. They represent a small but all-too-visible part of the police force.

Flint Journal extras
Policing the police Recent incidents involving Flint police officers:


LAWRENCE E. THOMAS: Put on 2 years' probation in December after pleading no contest to charges he packaged marijuana at his home and sold $100 worth to an informant. Also acquitted of assaulting a boy who threw a snowball at his car while off-duty, but the city paid $30,000 to the family of two boys involved in the incident.• JEFF HAZZARD: Resigned earlier this year. The city paid $175,000 in settlements related to an incident in which men accused Hazzard and other officers of brutalizing suspects.

• TONY M. JONES: Sentenced to federal prison last year after pleading guilty to gambling conspiracy in a case that included allegations he used his job to protect illegal card and dice games. He was fired by the department.

• ANTONIO BARBER: An undercover narcotics officer, he was fired last year for allegedly stealing a Madden 2005 video game during a raid on a house.

• SCOTT BAKER: In August, pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge for allegedly propositioning two women for sex while on duty in November 2003. If he stays out of trouble, the case will be dismissed in February, leaving his criminal record clean. As part of the deal, he resigned and will not seek reinstatement.

• JOHN M. SMITH: Pleaded guilty in September 2003 to disorderly behavior and assault and battery for striking his girlfriend and another woman with a wooden table leg during an argument. He was fired.

• OFFICERS CHRIS MARK AND RODNEY COOPER: Fired for allegedly violating department rules. But both were returned to the force through arbitration.

"I know the police department is a damn mess," Council President Johnnie Coleman said.

Fired by the department Monday were Officers Joseph T. Lechota, 29, of Flushing and Patrick M. Majestic, 36, of Swartz Creek. The two are accused of drug delivery, evidence tampering and misconduct in office and face pretrial hearings on the criminal charges this week in Flint District Court.

The pair are the latest in a series of Flint officers to resign or be fired for alleged misconduct over the past several years, although at least two of the fired officers regained their jobs through arbitration.

Some say police officers deal every day with the underbelly of society - and temptation."Police officers are virtually always bombarded throughout their career with big ethical issues," said Bruce Benson, a former deputy chief in Flint who now is a criminal justice associate professor at Michigan State University.

Still, Benson said his own research in Flint proves most officers have the best intentions. "The people in those jobs are there because they want to make a difference," he said.

Officers - current and former - bristle at the implication that the problems are anything but isolated incidents."It's tragic because I know these guys (in Flint). They are good officers, doing good work," said Brian Morley, an officer in Flint for four years and now a criminal defense attorney. "It's unfair. It's tough on the rest of them."

So, what makes a cop go bad?"I don't know. I wish I did," Benson said.

Every case is different, but a report to Congress in 1998 said profit, power and a sense of vigilante justice come into play in drug-related police corruption. Age and level of education also can be factors, it said.

Coleman said the recent arrests show how the department lacks leadership. He said he doesn't think Deputy Chief Gary Hagler is a bad leader, but said he lacks the organizational skills needed and hasn't been able to earn the respect of the entire department.

Hagler could not be reached for comment.

But Hagler released a statement saying Majestic is married to his niece.

"I want the public to know that I immediately removed myself from the internally initiated investigation," Hagler said in the release. "The federal authorities were immediately asked to participate in this investigation."

Coleman also said that while it shouldn't be an excuse for the officers' alleged crimes, the department is hurt by offering low wages and no raises in the past seven years. He said the city should give officers a raise before the issue goes into binding arbitration.

"I hope the city doesn't win," he said. "I hope the city has to pay the officers."


Tuesday, September 2, 2003

Officer John M. Smith - Sentenced - Flint PD

Also See:

Officer John M. Smith - domestic violence





Charges latest blow to cops' image
From Flint Journal files
Oct. 4, 2005
http://blog.mlive.com/flintjournal/2008/07/flint_journal_files_articles_related_to_antonio_barber.html

FLINT, Michigan - Two Flint police officers accused of stealing money and drugs are the latest but not the first to tarnish the department's reputation.

In recent years, Flint officers have been accused of soliciting sex on the job, stealing a video game and beating a handcuffed man. They represent a small but all-too-visible part of the police force.

Flint Journal extras
Policing the police Recent incidents involving Flint police officers:


LAWRENCE E. THOMAS: Put on 2 years' probation in December after pleading no contest to charges he packaged marijuana at his home and sold $100 worth to an informant. Also acquitted of assaulting a boy who threw a snowball at his car while off-duty, but the city paid $30,000 to the family of two boys involved in the incident.• JEFF HAZZARD: Resigned earlier this year. The city paid $175,000 in settlements related to an incident in which men accused Hazzard and other officers of brutalizing suspects.

• TONY M. JONES: Sentenced to federal prison last year after pleading guilty to gambling conspiracy in a case that included allegations he used his job to protect illegal card and dice games. He was fired by the department.

• ANTONIO BARBER: An undercover narcotics officer, he was fired last year for allegedly stealing a Madden 2005 video game during a raid on a house.

• SCOTT BAKER: In August, pleaded no contest to a misdemeanor charge for allegedly propositioning two women for sex while on duty in November 2003. If he stays out of trouble, the case will be dismissed in February, leaving his criminal record clean. As part of the deal, he resigned and will not seek reinstatement.

• JOHN M. SMITH: Pleaded guilty in September 2003 to disorderly behavior and assault and battery for striking his girlfriend and another woman with a wooden table leg during an argument. He was fired.

• OFFICERS CHRIS MARK AND RODNEY COOPER: Fired for allegedly violating department rules. But both were returned to the force through arbitration.

"I know the police department is a damn mess," Council President Johnnie Coleman said.

Fired by the department Monday were Officers Joseph T. Lechota, 29, of Flushing and Patrick M. Majestic, 36, of Swartz Creek. The two are accused of drug delivery, evidence tampering and misconduct in office and face pretrial hearings on the criminal charges this week in Flint District Court.

The pair are the latest in a series of Flint officers to resign or be fired for alleged misconduct over the past several years, although at least two of the fired officers regained their jobs through arbitration.

Some say police officers deal every day with the underbelly of society - and temptation."Police officers are virtually always bombarded throughout their career with big ethical issues," said Bruce Benson, a former deputy chief in Flint who now is a criminal justice associate professor at Michigan State University.

Still, Benson said his own research in Flint proves most officers have the best intentions. "The people in those jobs are there because they want to make a difference," he said.

Officers - current and former - bristle at the implication that the problems are anything but isolated incidents."It's tragic because I know these guys (in Flint). They are good officers, doing good work," said Brian Morley, an officer in Flint for four years and now a criminal defense attorney. "It's unfair. It's tough on the rest of them."

So, what makes a cop go bad?"I don't know. I wish I did," Benson said.

Every case is different, but a report to Congress in 1998 said profit, power and a sense of vigilante justice come into play in drug-related police corruption. Age and level of education also can be factors, it said.

Coleman said the recent arrests show how the department lacks leadership. He said he doesn't think Deputy Chief Gary Hagler is a bad leader, but said he lacks the organizational skills needed and hasn't been able to earn the respect of the entire department.

Hagler could not be reached for comment.

But Hagler released a statement saying Majestic is married to his niece.

"I want the public to know that I immediately removed myself from the internally initiated investigation," Hagler said in the release. "The federal authorities were immediately asked to participate in this investigation."

Coleman also said that while it shouldn't be an excuse for the officers' alleged crimes, the department is hurt by offering low wages and no raises in the past seven years. He said the city should give officers a raise before the issue goes into binding arbitration.

"I hope the city doesn't win," he said. "I hope the city has to pay the officers."


Thursday, August 21, 2003

Officer Tamieka Moorehead - Suspended - Detroit PD

On August 18, 2003, Officer Tamieka Moorehead shot and injured her husband [Loniel] during a domestic assault. Officer Moorhead claimed that she had shot her husband in self defense. According to reports, Officer Moorehead had previously been assaulted by her husband.


On August 21st, Officer Moorehead was suspended from the police department.



Also See:

Officer Tamieka Moorehead - Shot and injured her husband










BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS
Minutes of the Board of Police Commissioners Meeting
Thursday, August 21, 2003
http://www.ci.detroit.mi.us/police_commissioners/Meeting%20Minutes/2003/MinutesAug212003.pdf

Page 8

...On August 21, 2003, Police Officer Tamieka Moorehead, badge 3078, assigned to the 11thPrecinct, was suspended without pay by Chief Jerry A.Oliver, Sr.

On August 18, 2003, at approximately 2:00 a.m., the Professional Accountability Bureau was notified of an alleged act of misconduct on the part of Police Officer Tamieka Moorehead. More specifically, it was alleged

Minutes of the BPC MeetingThursday, August 21, 2003 Page 9

that while off duty Officer Moorehead did discharge her department issued weapon, thereby striking her husband in the neck and shoulder.

According to the information, On August 18, 2003, at approximately 1:35 a.m., at a residence located within the city of Detroit, Mr. Moorehead was asleep when he was awakened by Officer Moorehead throwing water on him. After which, Officer Moorehead discharged her department issued firearm at him in the neck and in the shoulder. After observing that Mr. Moorehead had been wounded, Officer Moorehead went to her neighbor’s home to seek assistance. Mr. Moorehead was subsequently conveyed to Sinai Grace Hospital, where he was listed in critical condition.

On August 19, 2003, felony warrant #36-64278 was issued charging Officer Moorehead with “Assault With Intent to Commit Murder and Felony Firearm.

”Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Officer Moorehead be charged with, but not limited to, the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:

CHARGE:CONDUCT, UNPROFESSIONAL/CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER; CONTRARY TO THELAW ENFORCEMENT CODE OF ETHICS, THISBEING IN VIOLATION OF DETROIT POLICE MANUAL SERIES 100. CHAPTER 102, DIRECTIVE 3, PARAGRAPH 5, SUB-PARAGRAPH 7 (102.3-5.7).

Unless contravened by this Commission, the above suspension without pay will stand.

Comm. Blackwell asked basically what happens is that they do an investigation. He asked if this is not just that one person telling their side of the story, clearly they do an investigation - correct, to reach this conclusion?

Comm. Norris stated again in felony cases, the Prosecutor has done that. The Prosecutor has charged the person. They have done whatever they would do to charge the person, and based on that felony charge; the Department takes action. It is her understanding, and AC Shoulders can correct me if I am wrong: In all of these criminal cases, the Department then conducts its own investigation which isn’t just looking at criminal activity, its looking at policies and anything else. But, they do not necessarily wait for that in a felony case.

Page 10 Minutes of the BPC Meeting Thursday, August 21, 2003 Page 10

Comm. Blackwell stated that we just react to the fact that they have charged by the Prosecutor and based on that information, even though it is a charge, at that point, based on the rules, they could not work anyway?

Comm. Norris answered right.

Comm. Blackwell asked so they have been charged with a felony?

Comm. Norris answered right.

Comm. Blackwell answered okay...

......Respectfully Submitted, DANTE’ L. GOSS Executive Director Board of Police Commissioners


Monday, August 18, 2003

Officer Tamieka Moorehead - Detroit PD

On August 18, 2003, Officer Tamieka Moorehead shot and injured her husband [Loniel] during a domestic assault. Officer Moorhead claimed that she had shot her husband in self defense. According to reports, Officer Moorehead had previously been assaulted by her husband.










In 2000, Officer Moorehead's husband had been arrested for assaulting her.....











....And, in June of 2003, Officer Moorehead's husband had assaulted her again....











The previous domestic violence she suffered at the hands of her husband, and her alleged attempt to protect herself in August 2003 during yet another domestic violence altercation fell on deaf ears. Officer Moorehead was charged with attempted murder.





ALSO SEE:
Officer Tamieka Moorehead: Assaulted by her husband. December 31, 2000:



Officer Tamieka Moorehead: Allegedly assaulted by her husband. June 24, 2003:







Officer Accused Of Shooting Husband Learns Fate
Cop Must Resign, Not Carry A Gun
Click On Detroit
POSTED: 10:24 p.m. EST February 29, 2004
UPDATED: 8:45 a.m. EST March 1, 2004

A Detroit police officer is paying a price for shooting and wounding her husband after an argument.

Officer Tamieka Moorehead of the 11th Precinct pleaded guilty to felonious assault for shooting her husband, Donnell, in the neck on Aug. 17 at their home on Winthrop Street in Detroit.

Moorehead apparently believed her husband was cheating on her with another woman.

On Friday, Moorehead learned she must resign from the police department, no longer carry a weapon, must undergo anger management counseling, and spend the next four years on probation.

Her husband is still recovering, Local 4 reported.











Cop To Stand Trial For Allegedly Shooting Husband
Attorney Accuses Man Of Domestic Violence
Click On Detroit
October 14, 2003
http://www.officer.com/news/IBS/wdiv/news-1831023.html

A Detroit police officer will stand trial for allegedly attempting to kill her husband, Local 4 reported.

Officer Tamieka Moorehead of the 11th Precinct appeared at a preliminary examination hearing Tuesday on charges of assault with intent to commit murder.

Investigators say Moorehead shot her husband, Donnell, in the neck on Aug. 17 at their home on Winthrop Street in Detroit.

Moorehead apparently believed her husband was cheating on her with another woman.

Donnell testified Tuesday in a whisper because of his neck wound, Local 4 reported.

Officer Moorehead's attorney reportedly attempted to establish a pattern of domestic abuse in contrast with Donnell's calm demeanor on the stand.

The defense accused Donnell of slamming his wife's head to the ground during an alleged incident on June 24.

Moorehead was bound over Tuesday to stand trial. She is currently suspended from the police force without pay.

If Moorehead is convicted of the charges, she could face life in prison.







BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS
Minutes of the Board of Police Commissioners Meeting
Thursday, August 21, 2003
http://www.ci.detroit.mi.us/police_commissioners/Meeting%20Minutes/2003/MinutesAug212003.pdf

Page 8

...On August 21, 2003, Police Officer Tamieka Moorehead, badge 3078, assigned to the 11thPrecinct, was suspended without pay by Chief Jerry A.Oliver, Sr.

On August 18, 2003, at approximately 2:00 a.m., the Professional Accountability Bureau was notified of an alleged act of misconduct on the part of Police Officer Tamieka Moorehead. More specifically, it was alleged

Minutes of the BPC MeetingThursday, August 21, 2003 Page 9

that while off duty Officer Moorehead did discharge her department issued weapon, thereby striking her husband in the neck and shoulder.

According to the information, On August 18, 2003, at approximately 1:35 a.m., at a residence located within the city of Detroit, Mr. Moorehead was asleep when he was awakened by Officer Moorehead throwing water on him. After which, Officer Moorehead discharged her department issued firearm at him in the neck and in the shoulder. After observing that Mr. Moorehead had been wounded, Officer Moorehead went to her neighbor’s home to seek assistance. Mr. Moorehead was subsequently conveyed to Sinai Grace Hospital, where he was listed in critical condition.

On August 19, 2003, felony warrant #36-64278 was issued charging Officer Moorehead with “Assault With Intent to Commit Murder and Felony Firearm.

”Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Officer Moorehead be charged with, but not limited to, the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:

CHARGE:CONDUCT, UNPROFESSIONAL/CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER; CONTRARY TO THELAW ENFORCEMENT CODE OF ETHICS, THISBEING IN VIOLATION OF DETROIT POLICE MANUAL SERIES 100. CHAPTER 102, DIRECTIVE 3, PARAGRAPH 5, SUB-PARAGRAPH 7 (102.3-5.7).

Unless contravened by this Commission, the above suspension without pay will stand.

Comm. Blackwell asked basically what happens is that they do an investigation. He asked if this is not just that one person telling their side of the story, clearly they do an investigation - correct, to reach this conclusion?

Comm. Norris stated again in felony cases, the Prosecutor has done that. The Prosecutor has charged the person. They have done whatever they would do to charge the person, and based on that felony charge; the Department takes action. It is her understanding, and AC Shoulders can correct me if I am wrong: In all of these criminal cases, the Department then conducts its own investigation which isn’t just looking at criminal activity, its looking at policies and anything else. But, they do not necessarily wait for that in a felony case.

Page 10 Minutes of the BPC Meeting Thursday, August 21, 2003 Page 10

Comm. Blackwell stated that we just react to the fact that they have charged by the Prosecutor and based on that information, even though it is a charge, at that point, based on the rules, they could not work anyway?

Comm. Norris answered right.

Comm. Blackwell asked so they have been charged with a felony?

Comm. Norris answered right.

Comm. Blackwell answered okay...

......Respectfully Submitted, DANTE’ L. GOSS Executive Director Board of Police Commissioners






DETROIT COP ARRAIGNED IN HUSBAND'S SHOOTING
REPORT: PAIR ARGUED AFTER WOMAN CALLED
August 20, 2003
BY BEN SCHMITT
DETROIT FREE PRESS

A phone call from another woman began an argument that ended when a Detroit police officer shot and wounded her husband, according to a police report.

After shooting her 25-year-old husband in the neck and shoulder, Officer Tamieka Moorehead called her mother early Monday morning from her west-side Detroit home, telling her, "Mama, I shot him," the report says.

Moorehead, a five-year employee of the department, was arraigned via video Tuesday in Detroit's 36th District Court on a felony charge of assault with intent to murder, which is punishable by up to life in prison. Magistrate Charles Anderson III released her on a $100,000 personal bond at the request of her attorney, John Goldpaugh. Anderson ordered that she have no contact with her husband.

A preliminary exam is set for Sept. 2.

Goldpaugh said after the hearing that Moorehead, 26, was defending herself when she fired her handgun at her husband, Loniel Moorehead.

"My understanding is that he was attacking her, and she defended herself," Goldpaugh said, adding that the couple has had other domestic run-ins.

A police report says the fight began after a woman called the couple's home on the 16500 block of Winthrop asking for Loniel Moorehead.

After the 1:30 a.m. shooting, Loniel Moorehead stumbled next door to a neighbor's house and said, "She shot me," according to a police report filed with the court. Tamieka Moorehead followed, telling her neighbors, "We had an argument. I didn't mean to do it," the report says.

Officers arrived and found Loniel Moorehead sitting on his neighbor's front porch. He was rushed to the hospital.

He is at Sinai-Grace Hospital in Detroit, where he was listed in critical but stable condition, Tuesday. Police Cmdr. Craig Schwartz, who heads the major crimes division, said Moorehead is expected to recover.

Goldpaugh said Tamieka Moorehead called the police after the shooting and has been cooperative throughout the process. She was held in police custody until Tuesday's arraignment.

A check of records at 36th District Court show that police arrested Loniel Moorehead on a misdemeanor domestic violence charge for punching his wife several times on Dec. 31, 2000. The case was dismissed March 8, 2001, when Tamieka Moorehead failed to show up to testify at a subsequent hearing against her husband, the records indicate.

A suspension without pay recommendation will most likely be presented Thursday before the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners. Goldpaugh, a lawyer with the Detroit Police Officers Association, said the union does not usually contest suspensions on felony charges.

In July 2002, Police Chief Jerry Oliver, citing a problem with officers and domestic incidents, made it department policy to suspend all cops charged with any kind of domestic violence. The department previously suspended only those accused of felonies. Oliver was out of town and unavailable for comment Tuesday.






COP CHARGED IN ATTEMPTED MURDER
DEFENSE CLAIMS DETROIT OFFICER SHOT HER HUSBAND MONDAY IN SELF-DEFENSE
By David G. Grant
The Detroit News
Wednesday, August 20, 2003
http://www.detnews.com/2003/metro/0308/20/c07d-249265.htm

DETROIT --- A police officer was charged Tuesday with the attempted murder of her husband, whom she allegedly shot during a domestic argument in their northwest Detroit home.

Officer Tamieka Moorehead, 26, who was accused of shooting her husband in the shoulder and neck, entered a not guilty plea to the charge at her arraignment in 36th District Court in Detroit.

This is a "pure case of self-defense," said Detroit Police Officers Association attorney John Goldpaugh, who is representing her.

The officer's husband, Loniel Moorehead, 25, was shot about 1:30 a.m. Monday in the bedroom of the couple's home on the 16000 block of Winthrop. He was in critical condition in Sinai-Grace Hospital.

Police charged that the shooting occurred after another woman called the house and wanted to talk to Loniel Moorehead.

But Goldpaugh said the shooting was about domestic abuse. He noted his client has charged her husband with domestic abuse in the past.

Court records show that Loniel Moorehead was charged Dec. 31, 2000, with domestic violence for hitting his wife. However, the charge was dismissed March 8, 2001, when Tamieka Moorehead failed to show up in court.

"There has been a history of abuse here," Goldpaugh said. "This is a self-defense case."

Tamieka Moorehead, who was assigned to the 11th (Davison) Precinct, has been suspended without pay. She was released on $100,000 bond pending a preliminary examination Sept. 2.

You can reach David G. Grant at (313) 222-2696

Michigan Officer Involved Domestic Violence