Saturday, May 28, 2011

Clarence Ratliff dies in prison : Murdered Judge Carol Irons

Officer Clarence Ratliff murdered his ex-wife, Judge Carol Irons [October 18, 1988]:











Officer Clarence Ratliff's assault of first wife, while on duty [1975]

Officer Clarence Ratliff's murder of ex-wife Judge Carol Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff shot at Officer John Den Boer after killing Judge Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff shot at Officer Daniel Ostopowicz after killing Judge Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff sentenced for murder of Judge Carol Irons [1989]

Clarence Ratliff's sentence confirmed [1992]

Judge Irons' murderer requests to be freed from prison [2011]

Judge Irons' murderer, Clarence Ratliff dies in prison [2011]



Clarence Ratliff's family was asking he be freed
Updated: Wednesday, 01 Jun 2011, 7:12 PM EDT
Published : Wednesday, 01 Jun 2011, 11:08 AM EDT
By Tony Tagliavia
http://www.woodtv.com/dpp/news/local/grand_rapids/Clarence-Ratliff-dies

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) - About a month after his family filed to have him released from prison because he was dying of cancer, a former Grand Rapids police officer who shot his wife in 1988 in her courthouse chambers died in a federal prison hospice unit, a prison officer told 24 Hour News 8 on Wednesday.

Clarence Ratliff, 75, died Saturday morning at the unit inside the Butner Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, N.C., the officer said.

More than 22 years earlier, on Oct. 18, 1988, Ratliff entered the courthouse chambers of his wife -- Judge Carol Irons -- and shot her. Irons died.

Ratliff's family was asking that the 75-year-old be released from prison so he could spend his last days with them in his former home along the Muskegon River.

"The family's contention is, enough is enough," lawyer John Smietanka told 24 Hour News 8 last month. "He needs to die at home."

Smietanka said at the time that Ratliff was bed-ridden, could not speak and would not offend again.

But ultimately, the 75-year-old served the entire sentence handed down June 12, 1989, by then-Judge Dennis Kolenda: Life.

"You struck close to a mortal blow to the peace, dignity and safety of this community," Kolenda said during sentencing. "Then, when this community in the person of police officers came to the rescue of the person you had mortally wounded, you attempted to kill them. I can imagine no worse crime."

Ratliff and Irons were going through a divorce. The former officer's defense was that he was too drunk to have known what he was doing, according to archived 24 Hour News 8 reports. Ratliff was convicted of manslaughter for killing his wife and assault with intent to murder for shooting at the fellow officers who responded.

That prompted protests, with one speaker expressing outrage that "the murder of a woman is considered less serious than shooting at and missing two men."

The assault charges eventually led to the life sentence.

One of Irons' friends, lawyer Diann Landers, told 24 Hour News 8 that she believes this "is what life in prison means."

Another friend, Judge Sara Smolenski, said while she too opposed Ratliff's release, she does not find any joy or peace in his death.

"The whole experience has been just horrendous for her family, for their family," she said. "It's really never over because it's something you live with your whole life."

Smietanka called Ratliff's death the end to a very sad story.


Officer Clarence Ratliff's assault of first wife, while on duty [1975]

Officer Clarence Ratliff's murder of ex-wife Judge Carol Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff shot at Officer John Den Boer after killing Judge Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff shot at Officer Daniel Ostopowicz after killing Judge Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff sentenced for murder of Judge Carol Irons [1989]

Clarence Ratliff's sentence confirmed [1992]

Judge Irons' murderer requests to be freed from prison [2011]

Judge Irons' murderer, Clarence Ratliff dies in prison [2011]

Thursday, May 26, 2011

Officer Thomas Cupples - Sentenced - Ferndale PD [retired]


Also See:





Former Ferndale police officer gets 71 months behind bars for sex assault
Published: Thursday, May 26, 2011
By ANN ZANIEWSKI
The Oakland Press
http://www.theoaklandpress.com/articles/2011/05/26/news/doc4dde6c0466fb0427471281.txt








An assistant prosecutor called Thomas Cupples “a man of great evil” before the former Ferndale police officer convicted of molesting a girl was sentenced Thursday to a minimum of 71 months in prison.

Cupples of Oxford did not make a statement when given an opportunity to speak in the tense and crowded courtroom. Through his attorney, he has denied any wrongdoing.

Cupples was accused of sexually assaulting the girl on different occasions, starting when she was 11 years old through the age of 13. Charged with two counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct, he was convicted earlier this month of two counts of the lesser offense of second-degree criminal sexual conduct.

In Oakland Circuit Chief Judge Nanci Grant’s courtroom, Assistant Prosecutor Jason Pernick had harsh words for Cupples, noting his background in law enforcement.

“The defendant has committed the gravest of crimes, legally and morally,” Pernick said. “Behind that mask of normalcy lies a monster.”

Pernick asked the judge to depart upward from Cupples’ minimum sentencing guidelines, which ranged from 36 to 71 months behind bars.

He cited several reasons, including that the guidelines do not take into account the impact Cupples’ actions have had on the girl’s family.

Defense attorney Elias Muawad said there were no substantial or compelling reasons to depart from the guidelines. He asked the judge to take into consideration the positive aspects of Cupples’ life.

During the trial, Muawad argued that there were numerous inconsistencies in the girl’s testimony and the testimony of other prosecution witnesses.

He said that the two cookies for pornographic websites found on Cupples’ computer came from an infected disc that Cupples had downloaded after he was asked to investigate potential pornography viewing by a municipal employee.

Prosecutors said the girl’s testimony was supported by other evidence, including DNA evidence that was found linking Cupples with the scene of the alleged assaults.

The victim’s mother told the judge during the sentencing hearing that Cupples’ actions will impact her daughter for the rest of her life.

“He assaulted her mind, body, soul, without remorse,” she said.

Grant told the girl that she found her to be eloquent and intelligent.

“You are not a victim in any sense of the word,” the judge said. “You have survived something, and that just makes you a stronger person.”

Grant sentenced Cupples to 71 months to 15 years behind bars. She also ordered him to have no contact with the victim and wear a tether for the rest of his life once he’s released from prison.

The courtroom was packed with supporters of the girl and supporters of Cupples, who sat on opposite sides.

People could be seen shooting dirty looks and heard quietly making negative comments. One of Cupples’ supporters called someone white trash at the conclusion of the hearing, and deputies kept both sides separated in the hallway afterward.

Muawad said in the hallway that he would have preferred to see Cupples get a sentence that started at the low end of his sentencing guidelines, but was happy that the judge did not depart upward from them.

He said Cupples maintains his innocence and plans to appeal on evidentiary issues.

“He denies any liability in this incident,” Muawad said.

According to reports, Cupples spent years at the Ferndale Police Department before leaving in 2005. He was hired in 2007 by Orion Township to serve as a code enforcement officer.

A township official said he was terminated in September after failing to attend work or contact the township about his employment.

               









Former officer convicted of second-degree criminal sexual conduct
Published: Monday, May 09, 2011
By ANN ZANIEWSKI
The Oakland Press
http://www.theoaklandpress.com/articles/2011/05/09/news/doc4dc82028a5698268292886.txt


Thomas Couples, former Ferndale Police Officer and Orion Code Inforcement Officer, on trial for molesting a girl. His trial is in Judge Nanci Grant's courtroom.

Supporters of Thomas Cupples broke into tears Monday when the former police officer accused of molesting a girl was found guilty of second-degree criminal sexual conduct, a felony that carries a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison.

While some people welcomed the verdict, Cupples’ defense attorney said there were multiple inconsistencies in the girl’s testimony and no evidence that his client had done anything improper.

“We were pretty disappointed with the verdict because of all of the inconsistencies and lies that we believe that the victim told,” attorney Elias Muawad said. “The verdict should have been not guilty on all counts.”

Cupples, of Oxford, was accused of sexually assaulting the girl on different occasions when she was 11 through 13 years old. He was charged with two counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct, and the jury decided to convict him of two counts of the lesser offense of second-degree criminal sexual conduct.

Oakland Circuit Judge Shalina Kumar, who took the verdict in the absence of presiding judge Nanci Grant, revoked Cupples’ bond. During the hearing, Cupples was seen turning around from his seat at the defense table and mouthing words to his family members. Later, he said, “I love you, too,” as he was being led out of the courtroom by deputies.

In her closing argument Friday, Oakland County Assistant Prosecutor Tricia Dare told jurors that the testimony of the girl, who is now 14, was supported by other evidence.

Dare said DNA evidence was found linking Cupples with the scene of the alleged assaults and that a computer taken from his home had images of the girl and evidence showing that two sexual assault websites had been accessed.

Muawad questioned the credibility of the girl and other witnesses. He said the images on the computer showed nothing inappropriate. He also said that the two cookies for pornographic websites found on Cupples’ computer came from an infected disc that Cupples had downloaded after he was asked to investigate potential pornography viewing by a municipal employee.

In her closing argument Friday, Oakland County Assistant Prosecutor Tricia Dare told jurors that the testimony of the girl, who is now 14, was supported by other evidence.

Dare said DNA evidence was found linking Cupples with the scene of the alleged assaults and that a computer taken from his home had images of the girl and evidence showing that two sexual assault websites had been accessed.

Muawad questioned the credibility of the girl and other witnesses. He said the images on the computer showed nothing inappropriate. He also said that the two cookies for pornographic websites found on Cupples’ computer came from an infected disc that Cupples had downloaded after he was asked to investigate potential pornography viewing by a municipal employee.

“Tom never downloaded anything improper,” Muawad told jurors at the beginning of the trial.

Will Amstutz, who is engaged to Cupples’ sister and watched the trial, said it was noteworthy to him that the girl said nothing bad had happened to her before the date in August 2010 that the allegations were disclosed.

“I know he’s innocent,” Amstutz, a resident of Beulah, said.

The courtroom was often tense during the trial, with supporters of Cupples and people who believed he was guilty filling benches on opposite sides of the courtroom.

“At least he’ll go away for a while. It makes me happy,” said one man after the jury’s verdict was announced.

Mark Shelton, an uncle of the victim, said he had been looking for a conviction of the more serious charge of first-degree criminal sexual conduct but was still pleased with the outcome. First-degree criminal sexual conduct differs from second-degree criminal sexual conduct in that first-degree involves penetration and could bring up to life in prison.

“We believe that he did the crime, that he sexually abused this girl,” Shelton, of Clarkston, said.

According to reports, Cupples left the Ferndale Police Department in 2005 and was hired in 2007 by Orion Township to serve as a code enforcement officer. A township official said he was terminated in September after failing to attend work or contact the township about his employment; Cupples’ supporters said he was in jail for more than a month at that time.





Monday, May 9, 2011

Judge Irons' murderer requests to be freed from prison

Judge Carol Irons

I just received the following email today, regarding the posibility that Ratliff may be released from prison.


Former Grand Rapids Police Officer, Clarence Ratliff [murdered Judge Carol Irons]


Judge Carol Irons, gunned down and killed by her ex-husband, Officer Ratliff [October 19, 1988].



Anonymous has left a new comment on your post "IN MEMORY OF JUDGE CAROL IRONS [KENT COUNTY]":
Shame on Michigan Parole Board for considering the "Rat's" release on "humanitarian" grounds. I say let him out feet first with toe tag on, with priority delivery to the hot afterlife he deserves. He ruined my mothers life the day he shot Judge Irons, she'll never be the same after watching Carol bleed to death in her arms. I'll never forget the day my Mother came home covered in blood, and hasn't been the same since.
Shame on G.R. Press for printing an article quasi supporting his release; and on Mother's Day no less! My Mom really had a wonderful day after picking up the paper from her front porch and seeing the "Rat" on the front page.












On October 19, 1988, Officer Ratliff walked into the Grand Rapids Courthouse...and into his ex-wife's [Judge Carol Irons] chambers.





Using his 9mm duty weapon, Officer Ratliff shot several rounds off at Judge Carol Irons...at least one of those rounds fired by Ratliff, hit Judge Carol Irons in her neck.







Judge Carol Irons died in her chambers, of a gunshot wound to the neck.








And for some reason, Ratliff, who is dying of cancer, believes he deserves to die in a more dignified place, than behind bars?




Officer Clarence Ratliff's assault of first wife, while on duty [1975]

Officer Clarence Ratliff's murder of ex-wife Judge Carol Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff shot at Officer John Den Boer after killing Judge Irons [1988]
Officer Clarence Ratliff shot at Officer Daniel Ostopowicz after killing Judge Irons [1988]

Officer Clarence Ratliff sentenced for murder of Judge Carol Irons [1989]

Clarence Ratliff's sentence confirmed [1992]
Judge Irons' murderer requests to be freed from prison [2011]

Judge Irons' murderer, Clarence Ratliff dies in prison [2011]








Should Clarence Ratliff be allowed out of prison more than 22 years after he killed Judge Carol Irons?
The Grand Rapids Press
Published: Tuesday, May 10, 2011, 12:08 PM
Updated: Tuesday, May 10, 2011, 12:35 PM
By Barton Deiters The Grand Rapids Press The Grand Rapids Press
http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2011/05/from_the_comments_should_clare.html

The appeal on behalf of Cancer-stricken former Grand Rapids Police Officer Clarence Ratliff to be allowed to die outside prison has readers commenting online.

So far, the majority of comments have been opposed to the idea of freeing a man who killed his estranged wife -- Grand Rapids District Court Judge Carol Irons -- and then fired at fellow police officers as he tried to escape the former court house.

But there is a group who point out that although he was given a life sentence for shooting at police, he was convicted of manslaughter in Irons' killing and given a sentence of 17 years.

The question is whether Ratliff, now a 75 year-old man who spent the last 22 years behind bars should be allowed to die with his family.

Many of the readers posted variations on the sentiments of Keynote:
"Ratliff took an oath to "serve and protect," and then I assume he thought he was above the law. According to testimonies, it wasn't a spur of the moment thing, he had forethought. He is not the only prisoner who has become terminally ill in prison. Do you think that other prisoners are afforded release just because they're sick. "NO!" He may be remorseful now and even repentant, but that does not bring back the life of this woman. When he pulled that trigger, he himself made the choice of where he wanted to spend the rest of his life...sick or not."

Bluemoontwo frames the issue in stark terms:
"Still remember this tragic day, so many years later! What should he get respect and dignity for killing his wife? He sure didn't give that to her, he shot her with his hatred! So he is dying, he chose to do this terrible crime, let him rot in jail!"

But a few people believe that Ratliff is entitled to leave prison , including Ms. Rat:"Clarence Ratliff was not convicted of murder, he was convicted of manslaughter. He has served 24 years in prison. He is not some backwoods murderer. He is a retired marine corp veteran, who served in Vietnam. He served on the Grand Rapids bomb squad for many years. He has served, protected, and saved many lives. I'm sure most of you writing these comments were not even born when this crime occurred. He has done more good in his life than you could even imagine. he does deserve to be treated like a human being. To the comments of him not looking sick in the photo... no kidding that picture is 25 years old.

HE HAS SERVED HIS TIME! HE IS NOT A THREAT TO ANYONE! HE DESERVES TO BE PAROLED!"
DeRadMan says there should be no special treatment for Ratliff, one way or the other:
"Seems to me that he was convicted of manslaughter and not 1st degree murder. He should be treated like others who were convicted of the same offense. I suspect parole is the norm by 22 years."

E-mail Barton Deiters: bdeiters@grpress.com and follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/GRPBarton





Murderer-former cop asks to die free
Clarence Ratliff dying of cancer
WoodTV8
Updated: Monday, 09 May 2011, 6:55 PM EDT
Published : Monday, 09 May 2011, 5:24 PM EDT
By Ken Kolker
http://www.woodtv.com/dpp/news/local/grand_rapids/Murderer-former-cop-asks-to-die-free

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) - Twenty-two years after a Grand Rapids police officer shot and killed his wife, District Judge Carol Irons, he is dying of cancer.

And, now, Clarence Ratliff's family is asking the state to release him from prison, so he can spend his last few days in his former home on the Muskegon River, with family.

"If he gets through this year, it will be a miracle," said the family's attorney, former U.S. Attorney John Smietanka.

Ratliff, a 21-year veteran of the police department, was drunk on Oct. 18, 1988, when he burst into the chambers of his estranged wife at the old Hall of Justice and shot her with his 9 mm handgun. They were going through a divorce. She stumbled out of her chambers, clutching her neck, and later died.

He got up to 15 years for the death, after being convicted of manslaughter, but life in prison for shooting at the officers who
responded. One of the officers was struck by shrapnel.

"He's sorry about what he did to his ex-wife, Judge Irons, and he will live with that -- he has lived with that for all these years," Smietanka said.

On Thursday, Smietanka asked the state for a medical commutation, which must be recommended by the Parole Board and approved by the governor.

"The family's contention is enough is enough; he needs to die at home," Smietanka said.

Ratliff, now 75, is in a federal prison hospital in North Carolina after doctors diagnosed him with cancer near his spine, which has spread to his lungs.

"Certainly, he is not going to offend again," Smietanka said. "He's in bed. He's bed-ridden, in a wheelchair. He can't speak. Today, he's got pneumonia. It's getting very close to the end."

Ratliff is getting support from more than just his family. Then-Kent Circuit Judge Dennis Kolenda, who sentenced him, wrote the
state two years ago, recommending it consider him for release.

John Den Boer, one of the Grand Rapids officers who exchanged gunfire with him, also has written to the state, asking for "compassion and mercy."

"It has been my understanding for a number of years that Clarence Ratliff has shown genuine remorse for what he did," Den Boer wrote. "I personally no longer hold any feeling of resentment for his actions, and I am convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that Clarence Ratliff is not a threat to me, to anyone else involved in the original incident, or to the public as a whole.

"It would be my request that Clarence Ratliff be given parole as soon as possible, to be with his family as he approaches death."

And, Smietanka said, former police Capt. Daniel Ostopowicz, the officer injured by shrapnel, has said he wouldn't oppose the release.

Smietanka said the commutation also would save taxpayers the expense of medical care. Ratliff would move in with his daughter, who lives on the Muskegon River, in West Michigan.

"His family will take over the burden, which is right now, on the state of Michigan and the federal government," he said.

Department of Corrections spokesman John Cordell said the parole board already was considering his release and is waiting for medical and psychological reports from federal prison before taking the next step. They expect those reports within days. He said the state only occasionally releases inmates based on medical reasons.

The state wouldn't release him without a public hearing, Cordell said.

Former friends of Irons, including 63rd District Judge Sara Smolenski, say they oppose the release.

"Mercy is something that wasn't provided to Carol when he shot her, and mercy wasn't provided to the police officers that he shot at when trying to escape when they were called," attorney Diann Landers said.

Landers keeps a photograph in her office of her and Irons the night her friend was elected Kent County's first female judge. They were not only friends, but Landers was her attorney in the judge's pending divorce case against Ratliff.

"He should do exactly what he was sentenced to do, live out his life in prison," she said. "If that means dying there, that's what it means."












Grand Rapids ex-cop who killed wife, and now is dying, gets support for release from prison
The Grand Rapids Press
Published: Monday, May 09, 2011, 7:46 AM
Updated: Monday, May 09, 2011, 11:12 AM
By Barton Deiters The Grand Rapids Press
http://www.mlive.com/news/grand-rapids/index.ssf/2011/05/grand_rapids_ex-cop_who_killed.html





Should he die behind bars? The husband, Officer Clarence Ratliff, 53 at the time (above), now is 75 and has terminal cancer.


Press File Photos. Should her killer be let out of prison? Judge Carol Irons was slain in her chambers by her estranged husband in 1988.

GRAND RAPIDS — More than 22 years have passed since city police Officer Clarence Ratliff went into the downtown office of his estranged wife, District Judge Carol Irons, pulled out a 9mm pistol and shot her to death.

Now, he is facing his mortality in a federal prison hospital, where he is dying from cancer.

In a race against time, supporters of Ratliff seek to move the state Parole Board along to release him on humanitarian grounds — a request that may end up needing support from Gov. Rick Snyder, according to attorney John Smietanka, a former federal prosecutor who is working with the supporters.

“He deserves a little dignity at the end of his life, a little peace,” said Steven Ratliff, a son from a previous marriage who lives in Alaska and has kept in contact with his father.

But for some of those close to Irons, the effort opens up old wounds.

After gunning down Irons on Oct. 19, 1988, Ratliff briefly exchanged gunfire with fellow officers in a hallway of the Hall of Justice before surrendering.

Ratliff ended up with a life sentence after he was convicted of manslaughter, shooting at police and illegal use of a gun. His action is often cited as one of the most infamous public crimes in the city’s history.

The hard-drinking cop who served on the major case team, motorcycle patrol and bomb squad now is 75 and has served about as much time in prison — in the federal system for safety reasons, because he is a former cop — as he did on the force. The man called “Rat” by friends could die at any time, his son said.

The younger Ratliff, 48, said the cancer was discovered on his father’s spine and then his lungs months ago. He has lost his voice, and even sitting in a wheelchair causes him pain.

A movement has begun to have him released so he does not have to die behind bars.

Norb Tuma, a retired manufacturer, has known Ratliff since the two served in the Marine reserves in the 1970s. He said that aside from his crime, Ratliff served his community as a soldier and policeman.

“Hell, he’s bedridden,” said the 67-year-old Tuma. “This guy is no risk to anyone.”
But letting him out finds no favor with some who remember Kent County’s first female jurist.

”When I’m outside enjoying a sunny day, one of the things that gives me a modicum of pleasure is knowing (Ratliff) is in prison and can’t enjoy these things,” said Diann Landers, who was Irons’ lawyer, campaign manager and close friend.

“There are a lot of people who do terrible things who go to prison, get sick and die,” said Landers, who now specializes in family law.

Ratliff first became eligible for parole in 2000 and has periodic reviews since then.

Former judge Dennis Kolenda is now in private practice, but he was a fresh face on the Kent County Circuit bench when he sentenced Ratliff.

Kolenda, who still may ability to veto a parole for any prisoner he sentenced, said he would not oppose release in Ratliff’s case.

“I wanted him to serve every day of the 17-year sentence he received for killing Carol Irons,” Kolenda said.

The current parole review began in February, and the state board is getting additional information from the federal prison in North Carolina, according to the Michigan Department of Corrections.

The board will be making a decision, but no time frame has been indicated.

Kent County District Judge Sara Smolenski, who claims Irons as both a close friend and a mentor, said she is still pained by the memory of the shooting.

Smolenski said a month before, while they dined at the Cottage Bar, Irons off-handedly said that if she was ever found dead, a warrant should be issued for Ratliff.

The two were separated and in the process of getting a divorce after a tumultuous marriage.

Ratliff was angry and had been drinking at West Side bars before he walked into the courthouse and shot his wife. In the days after, it was reported that Ratliff had sent Irons death threats.

Smolenski said she finds it hard to believe Ratliff deserves to be released. He confronted Irons in her chambers and shot her in the neck. She only had time to call police before dying.

“I think about how she never got the chance to be with her family when she died,” Smolenski said. “If we let him out, who is that for?”

Smolenski said she talked with Irons’ family for years after the trial, and they said Ratliff showed them no remorse. Irons’ mother, Virginia, died in 1992; her father, James, died in 2007; and her brother, Peter, died at 62 in 2008, according to the Arizona Secretary of State.

Ratliff is survived by three children and more than 10 grandchildren, some of whom visited him in prison within the last few weeks, according to Steven Ratliff.

Three supporters of Ratliff asserted the Parole Board is essentially sentencing him to die in prison. Former Wyoming Officer Michael Flynn, who retired and living in Texas and former Grand Rapids Officer George Pepper, now 73 and living up north, said it was not the intent of the judge or jury to deny such a release.

“It’s the human thing to do,” said John Robinson, a friend and motorcycle patrol partner, now retired. “There are so many victims in this: Carol Irons, her family and friends and the friends and family of (Ratliff).”

Ratliff’s son said release is just the moral thing to do.

”He made a terrible mistake a long time ago,” Steven Ratliff said. “But all the people who rush to oppose his release forget all the good he did.”

Email Barton Dieters: bdeiters@grpress.com













Saturday, May 7, 2011

Deputy Steven Fresorger - Saginaw SD

DEPUTY STEVEN FRESORGER, SAGINAW COUNTY SHERIFF DEPT:  
ALLEGATION OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE [May 07, 2011].






In May 2011, Deputy allegedly assaulted his former girlfriend, Tracey Moore.





















Tracey Moore filed a complaint regarding Deputy Fresorger's May 7th assault, with the Saginaw Township Police.








Tracey informed the Saginaw police that there was a confrontation between her and Deputy Fresorger at the Saginaw Township little league field.










According to Tracey, Deputy Fresorger grabbed her by the arm and pulled her off the field.










Saginaw Township Police Chief Don Pussehl confirmed that his department investigated Tracey's complaint and turned it over to the Prosecutor for review.








Deputy Fresorger was suspended from the Saginaw SD [with pay], on May 10th....three days after the alleged assault. The supension wasn't due to the domestic violence investigation but was due to the investigation of his illegal use of the LEIN system.








Six weeks after the alleged domestic violence assault, the Saginaw County Prosecutor still had not reviewed the criminal complaint against Deputy Fresorger. Throughout the ongoing criminal justice process for Deputy Fresorger's felony LEIN charges, there is no more mention of the alleged May 7th, 2011 domestic violence attack on Tracey Moore. It's as if it disappeared. ...




Also See:
Deputy Fresorger: Sentenced for misuse of LEIN [February 14, 2013]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2013/02/deputy-steven-fresorger-sentenced.html

Deputy Fresorger: Sentence 1 [June 29, 2009]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2009/06/deputy-fresorger-sentence-1.html

Deputy Fresorger: Sentence 2 [June 29, 2009]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2009/06/deputy-fresorger-sentence-2.html

Deputy Fresorger: Sentence 3 [June 29, 2009]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2009/06/deputy-steven-fresorger-sentence-3.html

Deputy Fresorger: Sentence 4 [June 29, 2009]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2009/06/deputy-steven-fresorger-sentence-4.html

Deputy Fresorger: Sentence 5 [June 29, 2009]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2009/06/deputy-steven-fresorger-sentence-5.html

Deputy Fresorger: Plea agreement for misuse of LEIN [January 08, 2013]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2009/05/deputy-steven-fresorger-all-lein-charges.html

Deputy Fresorger: Charged with misuse of LEIN [June 22, 2011]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2011/06/deputy-steven-fresorger-saginaw-county.html

Deputy Fresorger: Domestic violence complaints [May 07, 2011]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2011/05/deputy-steven-fresorger-saginaw-county.html

Deputy Fresorger: Unauthorized LEIN searches [September 6 - 7, 2010]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2010/09/deputy-steven-fresorger-saginaw-county.html

Deputy Fresorger: Unauthorized LEIN searches [July 17, 2010]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2010/07/deputy-steven-fresorger-saginaw-county.html

Deputy Fresorger: Unauthorized LEIN searches [May - June 2010]
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2009/05/deputy-steven-fresorger-saginaw-county.html





Sheriff's deputy could face 11 criminal charges
ABC
Friday, June 24, 2011
http://abclocal.go.com/ktrk/story?section=news/local&id=8213379

SAGINAW COUNTY -- (06/24/11) -- A Saginaw County sheriff's deputy could be fired now that he is facing 11 criminal charges.

He's accused of using a state-wide Law Enforcement Information Network for personal purposes, but he might also be charged in another case.

Steve Fresorger was formally charged on Wednesday, but the Saginaw County prosecutor is reviewing another criminal complaint involving the deputy.

In 2008, Fresorger was featured in an ABC12 story for helping save the life of a man who collapsed in a meeting. But now, the 41-year-old deputy is free on bond after being charged with six felonies and five misdemeanors.

"It's very difficult. It's never easy for anyone, but especially for one of your own. It's a sad day for Saginaw County," said Saginaw County Sheriff Bill Federspiel.

All of the criminal charges pertain to Fresorger's alleged personal use of the state's Law Enforcement Information Network, or LEIN, a system used by law enforcement agencies across the state.

"Run secretary of state information, license plates, we can find out owner information on vehicles. It must be utilized for professional purposes only, it cannot be utilized for personal purposes at all," Federspiel said.

While the sheriff won't disclose what Fresorger was allegedly looking for in the LEIN system, Fresorger is also under investigation for a domestic situation involving an ex-girlfriend at a Saginaw Township little league field on May 7.

"She alleges that there was a confrontation on the field between him and her and he grabbed her right arm and pulled her off the field," said Saginaw Township Police Chief Don Pussehl.

That incident was investigated by the Saginaw Township Police Department.

"This is a separate incident that was reported to us. It was investigated and this case has been turned over to the prosecutor for review," Pussehl said.

Federspiel says Fresorger will be put on unpaid administrative leave today, and a decision on whether he will be fired will be made next week following an internal affairs investigation.


Michigan Officer Involved Domestic Violence