Monday, April 27, 2015

Officer Mitchell Quinn - U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement [ICE] - Shooting death of Terrance Kellom



In 2008, the U.S. Immigration & Customs hired Officer Mitchell Quinn, just months after he was arrested, charged, and suspended from the Detroit PD for an OIDV incident, in which he aimed his loaded duty gun at his wife's head... 


April 27, 2015: U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn shot and killed fugitive Terrance Kellom, who was reportedly wielding a hammer...  "There was no evidence Kellom had a gun...The agent fired his weapon as he was retreating" [Detroit Police Chief James Craig]



Also See:
Officer Mitchell Quinn - OIDV incident - 
Detroit Commissioner's minutes - February 2008







February 19, 2008 - Officer Mitchell Quinn reportedly held his loaded duty gun to his wife's head. The incident was witnessed by their son. Quinn was arrested and charged with felonious assault and felony firearm.
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2008/02/officer-mitchell-quinn-detroit-pd.html

February 28, 2008 - Officer Mitchell Quinn was suspended from the Detroit PD.

March 2008 - Criminal charges against Officer Mitchell Quinn were dismissed.

September 2008 -  Mitchell Quinn was hired by the U.S. Immigration & Customs Office, as an Enforcement Officer.


April 27, 2015 - U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement Officer shot and killed fugitive Terrance Kellom, who was reportedly wielding a hammer.  "There was no evidence Kellom had a gun...The agent fired his weapon as he was retreating" [Detroit Police Chief James Craig].
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General, Detroit Police and Michigan State Police are investigating the fatal shooting of Kellom.











Attorney insists one shot hit Terrance Kellom in back
By Elisha Anderson
Detroit Free Press
May 15, 2015 - 8:44 p.m. EDT
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/05/15/attorney-kellom-shot-back-ice/27371041/



An attorney representing the family of a 20-year-old man killed by a federal agent last month in Detroit said Terrance Kellom was shot several times, including "once in the back."

Karri Mitchell said during a news conference Friday, which was attended by several community members calling for answers in the case, that he saw Kellom's body, has pictures of it and said there was an entrance wound in Kellom's back.

David Griem, the attorney for Mitchell Quinn, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer working on a multi-jurisdictional fugitive apprehension task force, responded Friday, saying his client "acted appropriately and did everything by the book" when he fatally shot Kellom.

Two versions of what happened have emerged since the shooting on April 27.

Police and Griem have said Kellom came at Quinn with a hammer as they went to arrest him at a home on Detroit's west side. It's a claim Kellom's family has disputed, maintaining Kellom was shot while kneeling and didn't have a hammer.

The task force went to the home on the 9500 block of Evergreen to arrest Kellom, who was wanted as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man.

Earlier this week, prosecutors received information from the police investigation, and the prosecutor's office is now in the process of conducting an independent investigation.

Maria Miller, a spokeswoman for the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office, said in an email today that "while the investigation is pending, we will not comment on any aspect of the matter."

The prosecutor's office previously requested that Kellom's autopsy results remain sealed until the investigation is finished and a charging decision has been made. Generally autopsy results are made public in Wayne County.

When Mitchell was asked what he thinks would happen if authorities released the autopsy showing how many times and where Kellom was shot, he responded that he thought it would probably create "outrage."

"I believe that (Quinn's) version of events is not accurate, and he should be charged," Mitchell said. "Simple as that."

Griem said he believes prosecutors will find that the shooting was justified and said Quinn initially fired one shot at Kellom as he came at Quinn with a "hammer held over his head."

Kellom continued toward his client, Quinn backed up, tripped over something and "as Quinn was falling backwards, he fired several more shots in the direction of Kellom," Griem said, adding it's possible Kellom turned or twisted as he was going down.

"When you're in the situation that agent Mitchell Quinn found himself, you keep firing until the threat is over and that is what he did," Griem said.

Griem said he doesn't think it's very likely there was a single shot to Kellom's back, but said it could have happened as Quinn was falling backward.

"Is it possible?" he said. "It's possible."

Griem said he hasn't seen the autopsy report and doesn't know how many times Kellom was shot. His client is in hiding and Quinn is worried for his family's safety and well as his own, Griem said.

Mitchell declined to say where specifically Kellom was shot or how many wounds he had.

"If he was shot seven times, shot nine times, shot four times, it is our contention that he shouldn't have been shot one time," Mitchell said.

He said he thinks a week should be a sufficient time for the prosecutor's office to make a charging decision.

Mitchell said he has handled many wrongful death cases over the years, and it's his opinion the wound to Kellom's back was an entrance wound, though a forensic pathologist has not told him that.

Dr. Werner Spitz, a forensic pathologist and former chief medical examiner in Wayne and Macomb counties, said Mitchell "may be right" with his assessment the wound is an entrance wound, "but he also may be wrong."

Sometimes even trained people makes mistakes determining those types of wounds, he said.

Ryan Bridges, a spokesman for the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office, said that "per a request from the prosecutor's office, I can no longer discuss the Terrance Ke‎llom case," adding it could interfere with the investigation.

Ron Scott with the Detroit Coalition Against Brutality attended the news conference Friday and said "People are looking for answers."

The shooting comes amid heightened tensions across the country over racial profiling and concerns about the increasing militarization of police. In the fatal shooting on April 27, the officer and the victim both are black.
















Attorney says ICE agent shot Kellom in back
George Hunter
The Detroit News 
May 15, 2015 - 6:33 p.m. EDT 

Detroit — An attorney for Terrance Kellom's family said Friday a federal agent shot the suspect in the back during a raid last month, which he said prosecutors have delayed telling the public because it would cause "outrage."

Karri Mitchell said during a press conference he saw Kellom's body, and there was an entrance wound in his back.

"Because of how many times he was shot, and where he was shot, it would create outrage," Mitchell said. "He was shot in the back. I saw the body at the funeral home."

Mitchell Quinn, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent, shot and killed Kellom, 20, in his northwest Detroit home April 27, while he and other members of a multijurisdictional task force were trying to arrest him for the suspected armed robbery of a pizza delivery man.

Quinn's attorney, David Griem and Detroit Police Chief James Craig said Kellom lunged at the agent with a hammer. Kellom's father, who witnessed the shooting, insists his son's hands were empty.

Wayne County prosecutors sealed Kellom's autopsy report because they said its release would impede their investigation.

Griem said it's not significant where on his body Kellom was shot, because he said the two men were falling as the agent fired his weapon multiple times.

"Agent Quinn was on his feet when he fired the first shot, and the several more that were fired subsequently came as he was falling backwards," Griem said. "We believe he was trying to disengage himself from Kellom, who could have turned as he was falling backwards. So whether one of the the shots is not into (Kellom's) chest does not mean anything.

"When you're being attacked, whether you're a police officer or not, you're not held to Marquis of Queenbury rules (that govern boxing)," Griem said.

Mitchell would not say where the bullet wound was in Kellom's back, adding he wasn't sure of the trajectory. But he said he knows the difference between an entrance and exit bullet wound. He said he didn't have a pathologist look at the body or photos he took of the body, and said he would wait for the autopsy results.

Ryan Bridges, spokesman for the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office, said he couldn't comment on Mitchell's comments.

"Prosecutors have asked us not to comment because it could potentially ruin the investigation," he said.

Griem said Quinn and his family went into hiding because the agent feared for their safety after someone posted his address online.

The shooting prompted protests near the Kellom home, and calls for calm by police officials and community leaders.

Craig was asked about the case during a press conference Wednesday by U.S. Sen. Gary Peters, D-Bloomfield Township, who called for the creation of a national commission to review the criminal justice system.

Craig said he "made nothing" out of the claims Kellom was shot in the back.

"You have to wait and see the findings that come out of the prosecutor's office," Craig said. "As the attorney pointed out, (Kellom) was shot several times. I'm not going to pass judgment; it could be wounds to the front; it could be wounds to the back. It just depends.

Being shot in the back "in and of itself, does not ... support one version. We should let the investigation play out."

Quinn was part of the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, made up of several local and federal law enforcement agencies. After getting a tip that Kellom was in his home, officers from ICE, Detroit Police Department, the Oakland County Sheriff's Office and U.S. Marshals were dispatched to arrest him.

Hours after the shooting, Teria Kellom told The Detroit News her brother was staying at his father's house when officers arrived, saying they had a search warrant, she said.

Her father first told police his son wasn't there, Teria Kellom said. She said she asked to see the search warrant and officers told her they would show her father the warrant after family members left the home. Officers then went inside to search for her brother, Kellom said.

Griem said Kellom jumped out from behind a blanket that was covering a doorway and tried to hit Quinn with a hammer, and that the agent opened fire before Kellom fell on top of him.

Kellom's father, Kevin Kellom, insists his son's hands were empty and that when he complied with the agent's order to raise his hands, Quinn suddenly started firing.

Nine shell casings were taken from the home, according to a search warrant return the Kellom family provided to The Detroit News.

The Detroit Police Homicide Task Force and Michigan State Police first investigated the shooting and turned their findings over to prosecutors Wednesday, Assistant Prosecutor Maria Miller said. The two departments were looking into whether Quinn was defending himself, as his attorney claims, or if he committed a crime.

"Our office is in the process of conducting an independent investigation into the fatal shooting of Terrance Kellom, while the investigation is pending we will not comment on any aspect of the matter," Miller said.

Mitchell said when he was 20 years old, he was attacked by a man wielding a hammer.

"I moved to the side and popped him in the jaw, and we struggled for the hammer," he said. "Someone with a hammer isn't life-threatening — unless you're a coward.

"According to Quinn's own story, there were several highly-trained officers there, and they have Tasers. Why didn't one of those officers grab (Kellom's) arm when he brought the hammer up? (Quinn) is a coward."

Griem replied: "That doesn't even deserve a response."

Ron Scott, director of the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, who also was at Friday's press conference, said the autopsy results should be released, and criticized ICE for withholding information about the incident.

"We believe there has not been transparency in this case," Scott said. "There are questions that are being swept under the table."

In New York City on Wednesday, officers on patrol in Midtown Manhattan approached a man who matched the description of someone who had struck four people in their heads with a hammer Monday, seriously injuring all of them.

Police say the man, David Baril, who has a history of mental illness, rushed toward them with a bloodstained hammer, which he swung, claw-end forward, at one of the officers, Lauren O'Rourke. Her partner, Officer Geraldo Casaigne, fired at Baril four times, striking him twice. Baril, who was charged with assault, is in critical condition.

















Family attorney: Detroit man killed by immigration enforcement agent was shot in back
The Republic
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
May 15, 2015 - 4:54 pm EDT
http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/996e557059f5488fa1f2d89de5a09a2e/US--Fatal-Shooting-ICE-Agent

DETROIT — An attorney for the family of a 20-year-old Detroit man fatally shot by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent said Friday that at least one of the bullets struck him in the back.

Karri Mitchell told reporters at a news conference that he viewed Terrance Kellom's body at a funeral home.

Kellom's death on April 27 came amid a national debate over police conduct — particularly toward black men — following last summer's fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri.

Rioting erupted in Baltimore following Freddie Gray's death last month. Gray, a black man, was injured and died in police custody.

Kellom was black, as is the agent who shot him. Kellom was wanted on armed robbery and weapons charges.

Groups have protested his slaying, but the demonstrations have been peaceful.

Police have said Kellom lunged at ICE agent Mitchell Quinn with a hammer before he was shot in his father's west side home. His father, Kevin Kellom, has disputed the police account.

An autopsy determined he had been shot multiple times, but Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy ordered the autopsy report not be made public. Her office is conducting a separate investigation into the shooting.

Maria Miller, spokeswoman for the prosecutor's office, cited the pending investigation Friday and declined to comment.

Mitchell said the release of the autopsy report "would create outrage" ... "because of how many times" Kellom was shot "and where he was shot."

Also on Friday, U.S. Sen. Gary Peters pointed to the Brown and Gray cases — and the January beating of a black motorist by a white Inkster police officer — as he called for a review of the nation's criminal justice systems.

Peters, speaking at Wayne State University, said the last comprehensive federal review of criminal justice systems in the United States was in 1965.

In April, the Michigan Democrat helped introduce legislation to create the National Criminal Justice Commission which would complete the comprehensive review. The board would propose reforms to address the most pressing issues.

"Whether we are talking about Inkster, Ferguson or Baltimore, the relationship between law enforcement and our communities is strained," Peters said, "and we face serious issues in our criminal justice system from unsustainable costs to overcrowded prisons to disparities in the grand jury process."
















Detroit man killed by ICE agent shot in the back, attorney says
By Gus Burns
MLIVE
May 15, 2015 at 12:59 PM
Updated May 15, 2015 at 2:14 PM


Terrence Kellom, Detroit fugitive killed by ICE Agent, shot In The Back The attorney representing the family of Terrence Kellom, who was killed by an ICE agent during an attempted arrest in Detroit on April 27, was shot at least once in the back.

DETROIT, MI -- The results of the autopsy were ordered sealed by Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy, but attorney Kerri Mitchell, who represents the family of 20-year-old Terrence Kellom, saw the body with his own eyes. Kellom was shot in the back.

"I'm not too concerned about the autopsy report, because I know how many times he was shot," Mitchell said. "I have pictures of the body."

The attorney would say how many bullet wounds he observed, stating he didn't want to interfere with Worthy's investigation.

Kellom, a Detroit man who absconded from probation and was suspected of an armed robbery, died when Immigrations and Customs Enforcement Agent Mitchell Quinn shot Kellom multiple times during an attempted arrest inside his father's Detroit home on the afternoon of April 27.

Detroit Police Chief James Craig previously said Quinn felt his life was threatened because Kellom lunged at him armed with a hammer.

Worthy won't let the family or public see the autopsy report, claiming its release could interfere with the ongoing investigation.

"I'm just asking them to be patient, because they're upset," Mitchell said Friday. "His father actually saw them kill his son in front of him."

The victim's father, Kevin Kellom, claims he never saw his son with a hammer.

Mitchell — saying he was personally attacked by a man with a hammer in his 20s, moved to the side, "popped him" and wrestled it away — was asked if a hammer would be considered a deadly weapon.

"Yeah," he said. "If you're a coward."

There were multiple officers from a multi-agency task force in the home at the time of the shooting.

A joint state police and Detroit Police Department task force completed their investigation this week and turned it over to the Prosecutor's Office.

Worthy says her office will now conduct its own independent investigation to determine if the shooting was illegal.

Being that all of the officers and witnesses have been interviewed, Mitchlell says it shouldn't take more than a week for Worthy to reach a charging decision.

"The investigation is going to rise and fall on the integrity of the other officers," Mitchell said. "We understand that Quinn has to cover his behind ... And I'm very interested to see what these other officers are saying about this alleged hammer."

Mitchell theorizes the supporting officers' statements don't align with Quinn's.

"Evidently, there's something amiss here," Mitchell said. "Because, if in fact these other officers corroborated (Quinn's) statement that he had a hammer, it would be an open-and-shut case.

"So evidently, there's something more to it for it to take this long."

State Police Lt. Mike Shaw declined to elaborate on the findings of the state police investigation.

Quinn, a seven-year veteran of ICE who formerly worked for the Detroit Police Department for 12 years, responded to the home with other law enforcers as part of a fugitive task force that intended to arrest Kellom, a wanted fugitive.

While Worthy investigates the homicide, federal officials are conducting a separate investigation to determine if Quinn violated Kellom's civil rights.

Kellom absconded from probation for a 2013 concealed weapon violation and had new felony warrants related to the March 31 robbery of a pizza delivery man with a rifle.

Quinn has previous felonious assault and felony use of a firearm charges from February 2008, but they were dismissed the following month.

The judge cited a lack of evidence for the case to proceed.

Quinn's wife, at the time also a Detroit police officer, accused Quinn of pointing his department-issued revolver at her head during an argument, according to Detroit Police Commission meeting minutes.

She said Quinn then grabbed her phone and broke it when she tried to call 911.

The officer was subsequently suspended before leaving the department and joining ICE.

Quinn is currently on paid administrative leave.

The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office hasn't said how long they expect their investigation to take.
















Family calls for release of autopsy following fatal shooting of Detroit man by ICE agent
By Gus Burns 
MLIVE
May 15, 2015 at 10:19 AM
Updated May 15, 2015 at 1:00 PM

DETROIT, MI -- The family of Terrence Kellom, a 20-year-old Detroit man fatally shot by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent inside his father's home during an attempted arrest April 27, want the autopsy released.

Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy halted release of autopsy results from being release by the Wayne County Medical Examiner to the family or public.

"The reason we had the (autopsy) report sealed is because it contains information that if released could interfere with the investigation of the case," Worthy spokeswoman Maria Miller told MLive.

The family's attorney, Kerry Mitchell, along with Ron Scott, founder of the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality and others plan to discuss the case and autopsy during a press conference at 11 a.m. Friday.

"Will the family of Terrence Kellom have to wait for answers as long as Tamir Rice's family has?" the announcement issued by the nonprofit Michigan United says.

Some involved with the press conference are also calling for ICE agents not to participate in multi-agency task forces.

Kellom's shooter, ICE Agent Mitchell Quinn, was assisting a fugitive apprehension task force when the incident occurred.

The investigation moved to its next phase this week.

A joint state police-Detroit police homicide task force completed their investigation and turned findings over to the Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy's Office Wednesday.

State Police Lt. Mike Shaw declined to elaborate on the findings and said Wothy's office will now perform a separate investigation to determine whether Quinn will face criminal charges for shooting Kellom multiple times.

Quinn, a 7-year-veteran of ICE who formerly worked for the Detroit Police Department for 12 years, responded to the home with other law enforcers as part of a fugitive task force that intended to arrest Kellom, a wanted fugitive.

While Detroit Police Chief James Craig told the public Kellom lunged at Quinn armed with a hammer, Kellom's father tells a different story and is adamant his son was not armed.

In an unusual move, Worthy ordered Kellom's autopsy be withheld from the public and Kellom's family, stating that it's release could interfere with the investigation.

While Worthy investigates the homicide, federal officials are conducting a separate investigation to determine if Quinn violated Kellom's civil rights.

Kellom absconded from probation for a 2013 concealed weapon violation and had new felony warrants related to the Mach 31 robbery of a pizza delivery man with a rifle.

Quinn has previous felonious assault and felony use of a firearm charges from February 2008, but they were dismissed the following month.

The judge cited a lack of evidence for the case to proceed.

Quinn's wife, at the time also a Detroit police officer, accused Quinn of pointing his department-issued revolver at her head during an argument, according to Detroit Police Commission meeting minutes.

She said Quinn then grabbed her phone and broke it when she tried to call 911.

The officer was subsequently suspended before leaving the department and joining ICE.

Quinn is currently on paid administrative leave.

The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office hasn't said how long they expect their investigation to take.

















Answers Needed On The Use Of Deadly Force By Task Force, DPD Says Police Commissioner
May 14, 2015 10:34 PM
CBS - Detroit
http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2015/05/14/answers-needed-on-the-use-of-deadly-force-by-task-force-dpd-says-police-commissioner/

DETROIT (WWJ) – As the Wayne County Prosecutor determines whether to file charges against an ICE agent involved in the shooting death of a Detroit man – a Detroit police commissioner is asking questions about the role of police in connection with the task force involved.

Police Commissioner Willie Burton of the 5th District says he’s not clear on what the Detroit Police Department’s role is on the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Task (D-FAT) force, and in particular, the policy on the use of deadly force.

The question comes after the death of 20-year-old Terrance Kellom, killed as he was taken into custody by members of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) – part of the D-FAT force.

“What is DPD’s policy on deadly force?” asked Burton. “What is the task force policy in conjunction with deadly force. And if we had tasers could this have gone a different way?”

Burton says he’s not clear on the Detroit Police Department’s role on the task force involved in the shooting and that citizens as well as the Board of Commissioners want the answer to that question.

Police said Kellom had a hammer in his hand as he threatened the officer, identified in media reports as 39-year-old Mitchell Quinn, who then opened fire.

Family members inside the home at the time, however, dispute that claim, saying Kellom, a fugitive wanted on armed robbery and weapons charges,  was unarmed when Quinn shot him multiple times.

“A man was … shot to death,” said Burton. “And also, what is the policy on employment of deadly force … should DPD participate on any task force that may place a premium role on human life.”

The Wayne County prosecutor’s office said Wednesday that it has received paperwork from a state and Detroit Police Department task force following the April 27 death of Kellom.

In April it was reported that Quinn, the federal agent under investigation for shooting Kellom, has been in trouble with the law before — he faced criminal charges seven years ago while working as a Detroit police officer.

















State police complete investigation of fugitive killing in Detroit by ICE agent
By Gus Burns
MLIVE
May 14, 2015 at 12:20 PM
Updated May 14, 2015 at 12:50 PM
http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2015/05/state_police_complete_investig.html

DETROIT, MI -- The investigation into the fatal shooting of 20-year-old Terrance Kellom inside his father's Detroit home the afternoon of April 27 has moved to the next phase.
A joint state police-Detroit police homicide task force completed their investigation and turned findings over to the Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy's Office Wednesday.

State Police Lt. Mike Shaw declined to elaborate on the findings and said Wothy's office will now perform a separate investigation to determine whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agent Mitchell Quinn will face criminal charges for shooting Kellom multiple times.

Quinn, a 7-year-veteran of ICE who formerly worked for the Detroit Police Department for 12 years, responded to the home with other law enforcers as part of a fugitive task force that intended to arrest Kellom, a wanted fugitive.

While Detroit Police Chief James Craig told the public Kellom lunged at Quinn armed with a hammer, Kellom's father tells a different story and is adamant his son was not armed.

In an unusual move, Worthy ordered Kellom's autopsy be withheld from the public and Kellom's family, stating that it's release could interfere with the investigation.

While Worthy investigates the homicide, federal officials are conducting a separate investigation to determine if Quinn violated Kellom's civil rights.

Kellom absconded from probation for a 2013 concealed weapon violation and had new felony warrants related to the Mach 31 robbery of a pizza delivery man with a rifle.

Quinn has previous felonious assault and felony use of a firearm charges from February 2008, but they were dismissed the following month.

The judge cited a lack of evidence for the case to proceed.

Quinn's wife, at the time also a Detroit police officer, accused Quinn of pointing his department-issued revolver at her head during an argument, according to Detroit Police Commission meeting minutes.

She said Quinn then grabbed her phone and broke it when she tried to call 911.

The officer was subsequently suspended before leaving the department and joining ICE.

Quinn is currently on paid administrative leave.

The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office hasn't said how long they expect their investigation to take.

















Prosecutors to investigate fatal shooting by ICE officer
By Gina Damron and Elisha Anderson
Detroit Free Press
May 13, 2015 - 7:16 p.m. EDT
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/05/13/independent-investigation-kellom/27257273/

The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office announced today that it will conduct an independent investigation into the fatal shooting of a man by a federal officer last month.

According to the prosecutor's office, it has received paperwork from police related to the April 27 shooting of Terrance Kellom, 20, in a home on Detroit's west side by a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer working on a fugitive apprehension task force.

The prosecutor's office said it "will conduct a separate and independent investigation of the matter."

Kellom was shot multiple times when police came to the home to execute an arrest warrant. Kellom, who had fled probation and was wanted in connection with the armed robbery of a pizza delivery driver.

Police have said he charged at the officer, Mitchell Quinn, with a hammer — a claim Kellom's father has disputed.

Attorney David Griem, who said he is representing Quinn, could not be immediately reached for comment.

Karri Mitchell, who is representing Kellom's family, said he found out about the independent investigation when the Free Press called. He said he doesn't know what information was turned over to prosecutors by police.

"What we have to do now is wait and see what (Prosecutor) Kym Worthy does in relationship to her own investigation," he said.

It's unclear how long the independent investigation may take.

The prosecutor's office has requested that Kellom's autopsy results remain sealed. Autopsies are considered public records in Michigan.

"It will be sealed until the investigation is completed and a charging decision has been made," Maria Miller, a spokeswoman for the prosecutor's office, said in an email.

















Protesters demand apology over ICE shooting
Holly Fournier
The Detroit News
May 8, 2015 - 10:49 p.m. EDT
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2015/05/08/protesters-want-apology-ice-shooting/26971355/

Detroit — More than a dozen people protested Friday and a few attempted to enter a federal building to demand answers in the fatal shooting of a Detroit man last week by a federal agent on a fugitive apprehension team.

The group, organized by the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, gathered in front of the Rosa Parks Federal Building at Mount Elliot and East Jefferson, calling for charges against Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Agent Mitchell Quinn in the fatal shooting April 27 of Terrance Kellom at his home on the city's northwest side.

"That's one of our demands. (Quinn) needs to go. Period," coalition spokesman Ron Scott said. "Because if he's working, we don't know where he is and if other people are in danger."

Quinn was placed on paid administrative leave after the shooting last week and went into hiding with his wife and three children when his address was publicly disclosed, his attorney said Tuesday.

Protesters on Friday also marched to the door of an ICE passport office across Mount Elliot from the Rosa Parks building to request a meeting with Special Agent in Charge Rebecca Adducci. The group wants ICE to issue a formal apology to Kellom's family and cease funding to multi-jurisdictional task forces like the one involved in the shooting.


Protesters march to ICE office on Mount Elliot near Jefferson Avenue in response to death of Terrance Kellom, who was shot last week by an ICE agent.

The group was blocked at the door by a security guard, who said she did not know where Adducci was working Friday. Scott joined a handful of protesters waiting outside the door as the rest of the group chanted slogans in the street, like "Fists up, fight back" and "Hands up, don't shoot."

Several Detroit police and border patrol vehicles gathered near the protest, as the office's security guard requested protesters and media move away from the door and stop filming on federal property. The guard eventually locked the door to the ICE office and Scott left a list of demands wedged near the handle.

Department of Homeland Security Inspector Kerwin Smith briefly spoke with Scott before heading into the Rosa Parks Building. He emerged about 10 minutes later and told Scott that Adducci was out of town Friday, along with the office's public relations officer.

Dawud Walid, executive director of the Michigan chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said the group previously sent a letter to U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade, outlining their demands.

"We're calling on the justice department to investigate this case more rigorously and be transparent in the process," Walid said. "Too many times when officers fatally shoot citizens there is a curtain of covering-up what took place, which can (cause) mistrust between the community and law enforcement."

Walid also took issue with Detroit Police Chief James Craig's statements after Kellom's death.

"Chief Craig was at the scene explaining what happened, yet the Detroit police had nothing to do with (the raid)," Walid said. "It appeared as if the Detroit police were acting as advocates of the task force and the actual perpetrator of the homicide."

Kellom was fatally shot by Quinn during a multi-jurisdictional Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team operation. Kellom was a suspect in an armed robbery of a pizza delivery man March 31 on the city's east side, according to the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office.

He was wielding a hammer when officers arrived at his house on the 9500 block of Evergreen, Craig said. The agent fired his weapon while retreating, Craig added.

Kellom's father has said his son did not have a hammer when he was shot; the autopsy report has not been released because police say their investigation is ongoing.

At the protest Friday, Scott said the pasts of both Kellom and Quinn are irrelevant to the demonstration.

"We're not here to evaluate Mr. Kellom just like we're not here to evaluate the officer who shot him," Scott said. "We're here for the action that happened that day. It could have been you or me."

Quinn was charged in 2008 with assault and felony firearm for allegedly pointing his department-issued weapon at his ex-wife, according to minutes of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners. Charges were dismissed in March 2008.

Scott admitted he was concerned about Quinn's past.

"Even though he was acquitted, I'm concerned about a person involved in domestic violence situation being anywhere in law enforcement."

Scott said more protests were to come.

"We're going to keep protesting until we have more accountability in law enforcement," he said. "Not only in Detroit, but across the country."
















ACLU, other groups seeks suspension of police task force after fatal shooting of Detroit man Terrance Kellom shot April 27 by ICE agent Mitchell Quinn
Published On: May 07 2015 03:29:36 PM EDT   
Updated On: May 07 2015 06:49:36 PM EDT
Click On Detroit




DETROIT - The American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan and other groups are calling for the suspension of a multi-jurisdictional police task force involved in the fatal shooting of a 20-year-old Detroit man.

The ACLU says that it wants the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team disbanded and funding to cease until investigations prove the task force poses no threat to neighborhoods its members go into.

The ACLU says a joint letter was sent Thursday to U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch and other federal officials.

Terrance Kellom was shot April 27 by ICE agent Mitchell Quinn. ICE has said Kellom was wanted on armed robbery and weapons charges. Quinn is on the task force.

Police say Kellom lunged with a hammer before he was shot. His father, Kevin Kellom, has disputed the police account.

















ICE agent accused in Detroit shooting goes into hiding
By Tresa Baldas
Detroit Free Press
4:30 p.m. EDT May 5, 2015
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/05/05/ice-agent-detroit-shooting-death-goes-hiding/26934063/

At the advice of his lawyer, and out of fear for his family's life, the federal agent who shot and killed a Detroit man during a controversial raid has gone into hiding with his wife and three children.

"They're in seclusion. They're gone," said the agent's attorney David Griem, stressing his client is worried about civil unrest. "I think he wants people to know that he is deeply concerned, not so much for himself, but for his wife and three children. He went by the book that night, but we've got people out there who are saying that this was an execution."

Griem said that his client, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer Mitchell Quinn, moved out of his Detroit home last Wednesday — two days after the shooting — and is now in an undisclosed location.

"I told him to get out of that house," Griem said, adding his client fears civil unrest could escalate as the shooting remains under investigation.

Griem said he believes that some local activists are stirring the pot and trying to incite violence and anger within the community over something that didn't happen. There was no crime, he said, arguing the shooting that killed 20-year-old Terrance Kellom was justified because, he claims, Kellom had a hammer and charged at his client.

Meanwhile, the Kellom family is calling for peace and calm within the community on the eve of Kellom's funeral.

A private funeral for Kellom is scheduled for 11 a.m. Wednesday on the city's west side. His family and their lawyer are urging the public to remain calm.

"We don't want any violence. We don't want any nonsense," attorney Karri Mitchell said on the family's behalf. "We just want a nice quiet funeral."

Kellom was killed April 27 during a raid on the city's west side. A fugitive task force had gone to a home on Evergreen to execute an arrest warrant for Kellom, a habitual offender who was wanted for the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man, and had previously fled while on probation for another crime.

Mitchell was part of the task force that went to they house that day. Police have said that Kellom was hiding in the attic when they arrived, and that he had a hammer when he came into contact with Mitchell, who responded by firing multiple shots.

According to Griem, police are now in possession of the hammer.

Kellom's father has disputed that version of events, arguing his son never had a hammer but was shot with clenched fists in a kneeling position.

The case is under review by the Wayne County Prosecutor's office.
















ICE agent's lawyer: Shooting of Detroiter was 'by the book'
By Tresa Baldas
Detroit Free Press
7:17 a.m. EDT May 5, 2015
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/05/04/ice-agent-terrance-kellom-detroit-federal-agent-shooting/26888125/

A lawyer for the federal agent who fatally shot a Detroit man says his client was justified in his actions, telling the Free Press the victim had a hammer and landed on top of the agent after being shot while charging at him during a police raid.

In a telephone interview Monday, prominent defense attorney David Griem disclosed for the first time the federal agent's side of the story about what happened on April 27 on the 9500 block of Evergreen, on the city's west side, where 20-year-old Terrance Kellom was shot and killed.

Griem said that he is representing Mitchell Quinn, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer who fired the fatal shots. He said Quinn feels badly about Kellom's death, but that the shooting — which is under review by the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office — was justified.

"He is very sorry that someone has died. But he believes that he went by the book," Griem said. "The shoot was a righteous shoot. And there certainly is not going to be any criminal case made of this."

Griem said that a civil lawsuit by the victim's family is expected and that he has been retained by a federal agency to help defend Quinn, who, he said, "did not think he needed an attorney."

Police have said that Quinn, who was part of a fugitive apprehension task force, opened fire because Kellom had a hammer, and Quinn felt threatened.

Kellom's father, however, has disputed that claim, maintaining his son was not armed, but was shot while kneeling down.

Here, according to Griem, is Quinn's version of what happened:

The Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Task Force received a tip that Kellom was at a home on Evergreen. Kellom was wanted as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man.

When the task force showed up, some officers went inside. Quinn and others stayed outside to watch the house.

Two officers went into the attic, Griem said, and found Kellom there and called for backup.

" 'We're up in the attic. He's got a weapon and we need backup,' " Griem said, recounting what Quinn told him.

Quinn entered the house. Another officer followed him. Griem said his client heard them saying, "Put it down. Put it down." Then: "He's gone. he's fleeing."

Quinn told his lawyer that he heard a heavy noise from a back room in the hallway. He saw a doorway covered by a blanket.

"Just as he gets to the doorway, a hand reaches out," Griem says. "He sees the hand, pushes the blanket aside and Kellom rushes through the open doorway with a hammer extended over his head."

At that point, Griem said, Quinn was "just two feet from the doorway." The agent backed up and pulled his revolver and ordered Kellom to stop and put his hands in the air.

"And Kellom keeps coming. Kellom is now within touching distance, the hammer is being waved," Griem said.

That's when Quinn fired the first shot, his attorney said.

"His thought was that one shot would slow him up. But it didn't slow him up," Griem said, adding that Kellom kept coming toward Quinn.

"He fires several more times as he's falling backwards, trying to get out of the way. He's not sure if he tripped over his own feet, or tripped over an object," Griem said. "After he fires several more shots, Kellom falls forward and falls on top of him."

According to Griem, a second officer was behind Quinn and had pulled his firearm. He would have fired except that Quinn was in the way, he said.

That version of events infuriated Kellom's father, Kevin Kellom, who lambasted the police as he stood in his house Monday, a few feet away from a bloodstained box near where his son had fallen.

"That's a lie!" a visibly irritated Kellom said of the agent's version. "That's crazy. That's unbelievable."

The Free Press took a tour of the house on Monday and photographed what looked like three bullet holes: one in the floor, one in a door frame, a third near a door handle. A blanket was nailed to one doorway, though the family said it wasn't there on the day of the shooting.

In the room behind the curtain was a closet, where there was a hole in the ceiling that led to the attic.

The family has adamantly denied that Kellom was hiding in the attic with a hammer, but has maintained that he was escorted down the stairs by officers, and that he was shot while kneeling.

"My son died with clenched fists. He didn't have a hammer. ... They assassinated my son," Kellom said during a peace rally last Tuesday.

According to Griem, this was only the second time in 18 years of law enforcement that his client has fired his gun in the line of duty. The last time involved a German shepherd that attacked him as he was coming up the steps of a house, said Griem, who once represented Bob Bashara and Stephen Grant, both convicted in their wives' murders.

Court records also show that Quinn was charged in a domestic violence dispute for holding his gun to his wife's head, but that case was dismissed.

Kellom's family, meanwhile, has retained its own lawyer. Attorney Karri Mitchell disputes the claim that Kellom had a hammer, and that he presented a threat to the agent. He said bullet holes in the house floor and along the lower edges of a wall support the father's claim that his son was shot multiple times in a downward fashion, and that there was no threat on any officers' life.

Also on Monday, the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office revealed it has taken the unusual step of asking the medical examiner's office to seal the results of Kellom's autopsy from the public until it can determine what happened that day, and whether the shooting warrants criminal charges against Quinn.

"We don't want the release of (the autopsy report) to interfere with the investigation of the case," Assistant County Prosecutor Maria Miller said, noting autopsy results are withheld on a case by case basis. "We do it in certain cases when we believe it could interfere with our investigations."

"The prosecutor's convenience in this investigation should not outweigh the public trust," said Detroit Police Commissioner Ricardo Moore, who urged Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy to release the autopsy report "as expeditiously as possible."

Mitchell, the Kellom family's attorney, said he respects the decision to keep the autopsy results sealed for now.

"The family wants them to do a thorough investigation, so if that's part of it, we're good with that," Mitchell said.

In addition to the autopsy report, two surveillance cameras inside the Kellom house could offer more insight as to what happened on the day of the shooting. One of the cameras is at the top of a staircase, which oversees the first floor hallway spot where Kevin Kellom has said his son was shot.​ The other is in the corner of the living room, which offers a view of where Quinn entered into the house and allegedly fell backwards.

Family members have said that on the day of the shooting, police took some surveillance equipment from the house. It is not known if there is any actual footage of the shooting.
















Attorney: Shooting by ICE agent was "justified" and "self-defense"
11:27 PM, May 4, 2015
WXYZ News - Detroit
http://www.wxyz.com/news/attorney-shooting-by-ice-agent-was-justified-and-self-defense





DETROIT (WXYZ) - New developments in the shooting of a Detroit man by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent last week.

David Griem is the lawyer for the agent, and he is talking, saying the shooting was justified and that Mitchell Quinn fired his gun in self defense.

He also said Quinn had to move his family to a safe house because of all the publicity surround this shooting.

You may recall the shooting happened on Detroit's west side last Monday. A fugitive apprehension team made up of federal agents and local police officers were trying to arrest 20-year-old Terrence Kellom.

Griem says officers were allowed into the home, and when a call for help came from officers inside, Quinn entered the home.

According to Griem, when Quinn got to the top of the stairs, Kellom charged at him holding a hammer.

"He had the hammer raised above his head in a threatening fashion," Griem said. "He and agent Quinn were within a foot of each other. Agent Quinn backed off, ordered the individual to drop the hammer and raise his hands."

Griem said instead of doing that, Kellom chose to attack Quinn.

"Officer Quinn fired one shot as he backed up, hoping it would stop Mr. Kellom," Griem added. "It did not, Mr. Kellom continued toward agent Quinn."

He said that's when Quinn fired more shots. Griem also added that Kellom's family has not been truthful about the events.

"Our sorrow goes out to the Kellom family, but at this time, it seems to me that the Kellom family is -- what they're doing and what they're saying is being suggested to them by an ambulance chasing lawyer who is trying to turn this into a significant civil suit," Griem said.

Both the Wayne County Prosecutor and Michigan State Police are investigating the shooting.

As to whether or not Quinn will face any criminal charges, Griem said he's confident none will be filed.
















Autopsy results sealed in fatal shooting by ICE agent
By Tresa Baldas
Detroit Free Press
3:50 p.m. EDT May 4, 2015
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/05/04/autopsy-terrance-kellom/26883635/

In a rare move by prosecutors, the autopsy results have been sealed in the high profile fatal shooting of Terrance Kellom, the Detroit man killed by a federal agent during a police raid at his family's home last week.

The Wayne County Prosecutor's office has requested that Kellom's autopsy results not be made public until it can determine what happened that day, and whether the shooting warrants criminal charges.

"We don't want the release of (the autopsy report) to interfere with the investigation of the case," Assistant County Prosecutor Maria Miller said, noting autopsy results are withheld on a case by case basis. "We do it in certain cases when we believe it could interfere with our investigations."

Miller said the prosecutor's office made its request last week with the Wayne County Medical Examiner's office.

"We're to release no information," said William Kaspar of the medical examiner's office, noting such requests happen "from time to time."

Attorney Karri Mitchell, who represents the Kellom family, said he respects the decision to keep the autopsy results sealed for now.

"The family wants them to do a thorough investigation, so if that's part of it, we're good with that," Mitchell said.

At issue in the Kellom case is whether Mitchell Quinn, a U.S. Immigration Customs and Enforcement agent, was justified when he shot and killed Kellom while trying to arrest him during an April 27 raid. Quinn was part a joint task force that was executing an arrest warrant for Kellom, a habitual offender who had fled while on probation.

Police said the 20-year-old fugitive had a hammer in his hand and charged at Quinn who fired multiple shots. But Kellom's father, who was present during the raid, has denied that his son had a hammer.

The community, meanwhile, is demanding answers from law enforcement, especially after hearing the father's side of the story.

"My son died with clenched fists. He didn't have a hammer. ... They assassinated my son," the victim's father, Kevin Kellom, said during a peace rally last Tuesday on the city's west side.

Kevin Kellom has claimed that his son was kneeling when he was shot, and that he didn't do anything to justify the shooting.
















Release of autopsy report delayed in death of Detroit man shot by ICE agent
By Khalil AlHajal
MLIVE
May 04, 2015 at 3:19 PM
Updated May 04, 2015 at 3:47 PM
http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2015/05/release_of_autopsy_report_dela.html

DETROIT, MI -- Officials are delaying the release of an autopsy report in the death of a fugitive shot by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent, citing the sensitivity of an ongoing investigation in the case.

Terrance Kellom, 20, died April 27 after being shot when a law enforcement task force attempted to arrest him at a home on Detroit's west side.

He was wanted as an alleged probation absconder and as a suspect in a March 31 robbery of a pizza delivery man.

He was shot multiple times by an ICE agent who was a member of the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, according to police.

Maria Miller, spokesperson for the Wayne County Prosecutor's office, told the Associated Press the autopsy report won't immediately released because it contains information that could interfere with the investigation.

Police have said Kellom was advancing on the ICE agent with a hammer when he was shot.

Kellom's father Kevin Kellom, who was in the house at the time of the shooting, has insisted his son had no hammer.

The agent who shot Kellom was placed on administrative leave pending the outcome of the investigation.

Kellom's funeral is scheduled for Wednesday.

















Family emotional at vigil for man killed by ICE agent
Jane Park
12:23 AM, May 3, 2015
WXYZ News - Detroit
http://www.wxyz.com/news/region/detroit/family-emotional-at-vigil-for-man-killed-by-ice-agent






DETROIT - Terrence Kellom's father broke down in front of the crowd at Saturday night’s candlelight vigil to remember the 20-year-old who was shot and killed Monday by a federal agent.

“I want to thank you all,” Kellom said, before lowering his head.

Dozens gathered in front of the home at Evergreen and Chicago where Kellom was killed. Police say Kellom threatened an ICE agent with a hammer after hiding in the attic when officers with a joint fugitive task force entered the home to serve a felony warrant.

As relatives and friends signed posters, lit candles and shared fond memories of Kellom, Detroit activists remained on hand to keep the vigil peaceful.

Ron Scott, spokesman for the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, reminded the crowd, “This is about the family.”

Kevin Kellom says surveillance video from inside the home will prove his son was not armed when he was shot and killed.

Detroit Police Chief James Craig has promised a thorough investigation of Mitchell Quinn, the agent involved in the fatal shooting.

















Family of Terrence Kellom, man killed by ICE agent, says incident was caught on video
10:30 PM, May 1, 2015
WXYZ News - Detroit
http://www.wxyz.com/news/family-of-terrence-kellom-says-they-have-evidence-that-will-set-record-straight




DETROIT (WXYZ) - The family of Terrence Kellom is speaking out again, only to 7 Action News. They say they have evidence that will set the record straight.

Kellom was shot and killed by a Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer as he served a felony warrant on Monday.

The family says there is surveillance video of the entire incident. Kellom's father said police took the surveillance video, along with three cell phones and a computer.

Two cameras were located inside the house along with one more outside. The family strongly believes the camera at the top of the stairs will show that Kellom, 20, did not have a hammer like authorities said he did.

Kellom was wanted on armed robbery charges, and agents had a warrant to arrest him. They claim he threatened them with a hammer, but his father claims there wasn't even a hammer inside the house.

Kari Mitchell, the Kellom family attorney also said the officers entered the home illegally, and released this statement.

"They had an arrest warrant, but not a search warrant until 4:30 p.m. Mr. Kellom didn't give consent to enter. An arrest warrant does not give them authority to enter."

Police do say Kellom did allow them into the home and say the video most likely will not be released until the investigation will be complete.
















Police have video from home where agent killed suspect
George Hunter
The Detroit News
7:07 p.m. EDT May 1, 2015
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2015/05/01/detroit-police-video-home-suspect-killed/26738687/

Detroit — A video system investigators confiscated from the home of an armed robbery suspect fatally shot by a federal agent earlier this week could shed light on what happened.

The shooting of Terrance Kellom, 20, occurred Monday in the hallway on the first floor of the home in the 9500 block of Evergreen, at the foot of a stairway and possibly in the path of a video camera affixed to a wall at the top of the stairs.

According to a search warrant return that Kellom's father, Kevin, provided to The Detroit News, Detroit police confiscated a video monitor that he said contained a chip that may have captured the shooting.

The chip also contained video from cameras mounted in the living room, on the porch and on the side of the house, Kellom said.

Officers with a multi-jurisdictional task force that included city, suburban and federal officers went to the Kellom house to arrest Terrance Kellom, wanted for the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man.

Police say Kellom lunged with a hammer before he was shot by Mitchell Quinn, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer. Kevin Kellom, who witnessed the shooting, insists his son's hands were empty.

"I'm hoping the video shows what happened, because my son did not have a hammer," Kellom said.

Family attorney Karri Mitchell said Friday he's trying to contact the security service provider to see if the video footage is available on a cloud system.

Detroit police have the video and are reviewing it as part of their investigation.

According to the search warrant return, other items confiscated from the Kellom home about three hours after the shooting include:

■A great neck claw hammer with a wooden handle, recovered from the hallway where the shooting occurred.

■Four .40 caliber shell casings taken from the living room, which leads into the hallway.

■A .40 caliber shell casing taken from the hallway.

■Another casing recovered from the bathroom, which is adjacent to the hallway.

■A seventh shell casing found in the hall closet.

■Four fired bullet fragments were also recovered from two bedrooms, the hallway and the molding of the door leading to the stairway.

■The black T-shirt Kellom was wearing, his cellphones, and the cellphones of his father and stepmother, Yvette Johnson.

"We got our phones back (Thursday)," Johnson said. She said nobody filmed the encounter with their phones.

Besides the Detroit police inquiry, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General is investigating the shooting. Detroit police are handling the criminal probe to see if there was any wrongdoing on the part of police and the federal agency is focusing on the internal investigation, since it was a federal agent who shot Kellom.

Quinn gave his statement to investigators Friday, Detroit Assistant Police Chief Steve Dolunt said.

Detroit Police Chief James Craig is not commenting on the case since the investigation is not completed, although he said he told the media Terrance Kellom had a hammer, hoping the information would calm irate residents.

"'No comment' by a police chief can foster distrust in the community and tends to suggest we're hiding something," Craig said. "I'm not going to reveal everything I know about an investigation, but I'll give the public enough so they know what took place."

Mitchell and Ron Scott, director of the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, criticized the chief for telling reporters Kellom was armed with a hammer.

"In the future, if you don't have the matter fully investigated, don't speak to it," Scott said.

Craig replied: "If I sit there and say 'no comment,' I'll be criticized for that."

Police reportedly were called to the Kellom home by a girlfriend who claimed Terrance Kellom was beating her, but Mitchell disputed those reports.

"I talked to her, and she said it wasn't true," Mitchell said. "There are a lot of untrue things being said about this case."

Kevin Kellom and his wife say police told them they had a warrant to search the home, although they never produced one.

"There was no search warrant," Mitchell said.

However, if police felt Terrance Kellom's girlfriend was in danger when she reportedly called about being abused, they wouldn't need a warrant to enter the home, University of Detroit-Mercy law professor Larry Dubin said.

"If police think someone is in immediate danger, that could be a circumstance which would not require a search warrant," he said.

A private funeral for Terrance Kellom is planned for Wednesday.

















Worries arise in Detroit after riot in Baltimore
George Hunter
The Detroit News
12:15 a.m. EDT May 1, 2015
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2015/04/30/video-unruly-crowd-confronts-detroit-police/26633109/


Detroit — Concern Thursday about the fatal shooting of a suspect by a federal agent turned to a discussion about rioting in Baltimore and how Detroit police might handle a similar situation.

At a meeting of the Detroit Police Board of Commissioners, some members of the civilian oversight panel were concerned the discontent seen after armed robbery suspect Terrance Kellom's shooting could escalate.

"I sit on the advisory board for Comerica Bank, and I'm getting asked: 'What is the plan if something like Baltimore happens in Detroit?' " Commissioner Eva Garza Dewaelsche said. "Corporations downtown want to know."

Assistant Police Chief Steve Dolunt said there is a strategy mapped out. "An evacuation plan would go through Homeland Security," he said. "We have plans in place if there's a problem."

After the meeting, Detroit Police Chief James Craig told The Detroit News: "There has always been a plan in place to address civil unrest and the potential for unrest. People got a snapshot this week of how we would respond to problems: We talk to community leaders, we work with them, but if someone commits a crime, we'll take appropriate action.

"I'm not going to publicly say how we'll stage up if we anticipate unrest, but we continually train and make sure our officers have proper equipment. That's not just something we're doing now; we do that on a regular basis."

Officials involved with local tourism and philanthropic efforts agree that turbulence in the streets has the potential to harm business as well as other areas in Detroit.

Pursuing a preventative strategy "is very forward thinking and very proactive," said Robert Thornton, a senior program officer at the Skillman Foundation. "What happens in Baltimore can happen in any community if the stakeholders are not responsive to challenges that face the community. I think it can very much happen here, I just happen to think that there are a number of people in the community that are beginning to come together to ensure that it does not."

Bill Bohde, senior vice president of sales and marketing at the Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau, said Thursday night his group isn't currently engaged with city authorities about a specific strategy but "will be prepared if anything were to occur."

"Right now we are very optimistic about what is going on in Detroit," Bohde said.

After U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn on Monday shot and killed Kellom, 20, a group the next night protested the shooting, spilling into the street, blocking traffic and cussing at officers who were monitoring the protest.

"They came real close to crossing the line and getting arrested," Craig said Thursday after the video of the protest surfaced.

Immediately after Kellom was shot during a raid in a home in the 9500 block of Evergreen, Dolunt responded to the scene, and said the crowd that gathered outside the house was on the verge of getting violent.

"The last person they wanted to see was me, because I'm Caucasian," Dolunt said. "I understand that, which is why I called the chief to come to the scene."

Quinn was part of the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, multi-jurisdictional task force of city, surburban and federal officers. They had an arrest warrant for Kellom, who was wanted for the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man. Craig said he lunged at agents with a hammer before he was shot.

"A lot of citizens feel uncomfortable with these task forces because they feel like they're white invading armies," Dolunt said. "Most of the federal agents are Caucasian." Quinn is black.

Dolunt called Craig, who responded to the scene and immediately spoke with Kellom's family, before addressing neighbors.

Commission Chairman Willie Bell complained the police board isn't being included in responses to the Kellom shooting.

Although the City Charter mandates the 11-member board oversee the police department, its powers were usurped when Kevyn Orr was appointed emergency manager. When he left, he issued Order 42, which transitioned power over the police department to Mayor Mike Duggan.

"When you hear the hue and cry across the country for more police oversight, I'm frustrated that we're still being kept out of the process," Bell said. "We want to be involved in the public safety of Detroit."

Bell and Ron Scott, director of the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, lambasted ICE officials for not talking to the public about the incident, although ICE Special Agent in Charge Rebecca Adducci did address a crowd during a community meeting Wednesday.

"People thought DPD was involved, because ICE isn't making any statements," Bell said.

The shooting is being investigated by Detroit Police and the Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General. A Homeland Security spokesperson could not be reached for comment Thursday.

Dolunt said investigators have gotten statements from every officer who was present, except Quinn.

While most of the protests of the shooting have been peaceful, a shaky 3:05 video emerged Thursday of Tuesday's protest.

A line of squad cars is seen moving slowly down the street, as members of the crowd yell, "Shoot! Shoot!" At one point, one man, clad in a T-shirt with the number 32 on the back, appears to pantomime striking the police cruiser.

After a few seconds, the crowd backs away, allowing the squad car, driven by a female corporal, to pass. Members of the crowd cheer, raising their arms and chanting "hands up!"

Another police car approaches, but is halted when a man walks into the street. "He got a hammer!" people yell as the man turns around, lifts his shirt, and says, "My back (is) right here."

One man is heard yelling: "Don't get close to that car! You've got to know the law." Another man replies: "My back (is) right here. They (the police) don't know the law."

Craig said local community leaders were instrumental in calming things down.

"They did a good job of defusing things," he said.

"We will facilitate a peaceful protest, and we even give a little," Craig said. "Even though we don't want them in the street, because it impedes traffic, we've been allowing that, as long as cars can safely pass. We've been very compromising.

"But the other night, they got close to going to jail."

















ICE agent who killed Detroit fugitive during arrest has imperfect past
By Gus Burns
April 30, 2015 at 10:53 AM
Updated April 30, 2015 at 4:21 PM
http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2015/04/ice_agent_who_killed_detroit_f.html

DETROIT -- Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents have said little about why one of its agents shot and killed a wanted Detroit man, 20-year-old Terrance Kellom, Monday afternoon.
ICE identified the shooter as a lifelong Detroit resident and 7-year-veteran of the agency. He formerly worked as a Detroit police officer for 12 years.

The agent "has no history of adverse personnel actions" and has been placed on paid administrative leave pending the investigation, ICE spokesman Khaalid H. Walls said in a prepared statement.

Detroit News reporters George Hunter and Robert Snell, through their sources confirmed the agent is ex-Detroit Police Officer Mitchell Quinn, who ran for Wayne County sheriff in 2004 and placed last in the field of eight.

Detroit News story
Quinn had other problems during his time on the Detroit Police Department.
According to online Wayne County court records, Quinn was charged with felonious assault and felony use of a firearm in February 2008. The charges were dismissed the following month. The judge cited a lack of evidence for the case to proceed.

Quinn's wife, at the time also a Detroit police officer, accused Quinn of pointing his department-issued revolver at her head during an argument in February 2008, according to Detroit Police Commission meeting minutes.

She said Quinn grabbed her phone and broke when she tried to call 911.

The officer was subsequently suspended.

Quinn, while working for the Detroit Police Department, was also involved in a 1998 arrest that led to a lawsuit against himself, fellow Officer Eugen Brown and the city of Detroit.

The lawsuit claims Trevor Bender was sitting in his mother's car in front of their house with two men listening to a cassette. The vehicle was shut off.

Quinn and Brown approached the vehicle and Brown demanded Bender's license.

Brown reportedly ordered Bender from the car, placed him in a choke hold and said, "I'll snap your (expletive) neck," according to the lawsuit.

"Defendant Quinn stood idly by while defendant Brown was assaulting and battering the plaintiff," the lawsuit says. Quinn then ordered the other men to exit the vehicle and both men conducted a pat-down without stating the reason for the interaction.

The complains says Bender was arrested and later charged with a misdemeanor for not having a license in his possession.

Scant details have been released by law enforcement regarding the shooting of Kellom by Quinn Monday.

Kellom absconded from probation for a 2013 concealed weapon violation and had new felony warrants related to the Mach 31 robbery of a pizza delivery man with a rifle.

The U.S. Marshals Service-led Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, which Quinn was a part of, intended to arrest Kellom Monday.
Detroit police and the federal Inspector Giovanni Tiano are investigating whether the killing was justified.
The "agent went in to make an arrest for the wanted suspect, the suspect was advancing on him with a hammer," Detroit Police Chief James Craig said Wednesday. "As the agent retreated, he fired shots as the suspect advanced.

" ... It was the officer who believed he was faced with an imminent threat to his life and he responded by using deadly force."

Terrance Kellom's father, Kevin Kellom, disputes that.

"My son had no hammer," Kevin Kellom said Tuesday. "That's a lie and I'll put that on my mom and dad's graves ... "

Kevin Kellom hasn't alleged the killing to be racially motivated. Both his son and Quinn are black.

Craig said the investigation will be thorough and timely.

Quinn is currently on administrative leave.
















ICE agent who killed Detroit fugitive during arrest has imperfect past
By Gus Burns
April 30, 2015 at 10:53 AM
Updated April 30, 2015 at 4:21 PM





























































Detroit law enforcers engage public following fatal shooting of fugitive by ICE agent
By Gus Burns
April 30, 2015 at 7:32 AM
Updated April 30, 2015 at 7:36 AM




ICE officer kills Detroit fugitive 
Police remained on the scene into Monday evening after an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer shot and killed a fugitive inside a Detroit home while serving and arrest warrant on the 9500 block of Evergreen on Detroit's west side April 27, 2015. 
(Tanya Moutzalias | MLive Detroit)


DETROIT, MI -- Amidst ongoing national police-citizen tension, most recently with riots in Baltimore following the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody, Detroit Police Chief James Craig didn't hesitate to take a proactive stance.

After an Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agent killed Terrance Kellom, a 20-year-old probation absconder and wanted felon, inside his father's Detroit home Monday, Craig went immediately to the scene.

He told Kevin Kellom, Terrance Kellom's father, a thorough and timely investigation would be conducted and a town hall meeting planned in the coming 48 hours.

Craig followed through with his commitment to meet with the public Wednesday.

Heads of the federal agencies involved in the Kellom shooting -- Inspector General Giovanni Tiano, who is investigating the incident for the federal government; U.S. Marshal Robert Grubbs, who oversees the fugitive task force that attempted to arrest Kellom; and ICE Special Agent in Charge Rebecca Adducci, representing the shooter's employer -- joined Craig at Grace Community Church in Detroit, a baseball throw from where Kellom died.

The stated purpose of the gathering was to "share information and discuss views regarding the recent events," according to the agenda.

Over 150 people, including a large police contingent, filled much of the church.

Since the shooting, law enforcement -- specifically heads of the federal agencies -- have remained virtually silent about the details of the shooting, and they continued in that vein Wednesday, saying they wouldn't discuss the ongoing investigation.

The most substantial explanation from an official about what allegedly happened came from Craig.

The "agent went in to make an arrest for the wanted suspect, the suspect was advancing on him with a hammer," Craig said Wednesday. "As the agent retreated, he fired shots as the suspect advanced.

" ... It was the officer who believed he was faced with an imminent threat to his life and he responded by using deadly force."

One witness, Terrance Kellom's father, shared his version of the encounter this week, and it already diverges from what the chief said.
"My son had no hammer," Kevin Kellom said Tuesday. "That's a lie and I'll put that on my mom and dad's graves ... "

The fugitive apprehension team arrived at Kevin Kellom's home with an arrest warrant after noon Monday.

Kevin Kellom says he only opened the door after one of several law enforcers told him: "Open the door mother (expletive) or we're going to knock it down."

Kellom said he named off the people inside at an officer's request but intentionally left out his son's name.

Without permission, according to Kevin Kellom, multiple officers left the entrance hall and went upstairs.

He says five to 10 minutes passed before he heard an officer yell, "Freeze, show me your hands." Then his three to four offices came down the stairs with Terrance Kellom, who was verbally attacking the officers.

Kevin Kellom claims he told his son to comply with the police, who were telling him to remove his hands from his pockets, and when Terrance Kellom removed his hands was shot twice in the chest.

As he struggled with police who managed to handcuff one of his wrists, Kevin Kellom said he heard a series of about eight more shots and saw his son lying on the ground.

After the fatal shooting, Kevin Kellom said investigators did obtain a search warrant signed at 4:39 p.m. His daughter said Wednesday investigators seized, among other items, a computer and security cameras.

Inspector General Tiano declined to comment whether those items were seized or why they might be of interest in the investigation.

Police were also seen removing a hammer from the house.

The Detroit Police Department is investigating the homicide, to determine if the ICE officer was justified in shooting Kellom. Once completed, Craig said that investigation will be turned over to the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office for criminal review.

Tiano is conducting a second investigation on behalf of the federal government, which Craig said won't likely be completed until following the Detroit police investigation.

"We work them together but I am a separate entity ... and really what I focus on is internal corruption within a department," Tiano said. " ... I will present my findings to the U.S. Attorney."

Tiano says he concentrates on criminal civil rights violations, and if the agent is found guilty, he could face criminal prosecution in both federal and state courts.

As far as a timeline, Tiano couldn't provide one, but said "it takes months."

it's a "complicated investigation" but "this is moving at light speed, if you want my opinion ... " Tiano said.

While speaking during the community meeting, Grubbs, head of the multi-agency Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Task Force, told the crowd media has reported a lot of "half-truths" since the shooting.

After the meeting, Grubbs declined to elaborate on what aspects of the reports he considered "half-truths."

The bulk of the 2-hour-plus meeting was taken up by public comment, some of which illustrated underlying tension that exists in Detroit neighborhoods concerning relations with police.

A 33-year-old man who garnered a good amount of applause from the audience said he's "in fear of what could happen" if too much time passes without answers.

"I want to see some good cops arrest the bad cops," he said. "I want to see these officers step up and show some integrity and make sure that the officers who are corrupt amongst you all -- because I don't believe all officer are corrupt, that's ludicrous -- but the ones who aren't, raise the integrity and bring some justice."
















Inside the house: Kellom family tells their side of shooting
Updated: Apr 30, 2015 6:24 AM CDT
By Randy Wimbley, Fox 2 News
Fox News - Detroit
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/28937123/inside-the-house-kellom-family-tells-their-side-of-shooting







DETROIT (WJBK) - Two very different stories are being told when it comes to the death of 20-year-old Terrance Kellom.

Sources say Kellom dropped down from the house attack and came at a federal agent with a hammer during a raid. Unlike other police shootings that have happened around the country, both the agent, Mitchell Quinn, and the victim were black.

FOX 2 went inside the house on Evergreen near West Chicago and saw where the shooting took place Monday afternoon. 

The family explained that the account of Kellom wielding a hammer and confronted the agent, is not true. 

"He came down these stairs with the police," said Kevin Kellom, Terrance Kellom's father. "If he had a hammer, why not kill him upstairs?"

Kevin Kellom is challenging law enforcement accounts of the shooting that killed his son.

"The facts speak for themselves," said Ron Scott, activist. "The physical facts speak for themselves."

Sources tell FOX 2 that Kellom was hiding in the attic, dropped through the ceiling, and then went after Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent Mitchell Quinn. 

FOX 2: "It looks like that (ceiling spot) was patched in."

Scott: "No that's black mold, that has been there since they bought the home - and that was in December."

FOX 2 checked out the room and the likely areas Kellom could have come down from the attic, including a closet.

"As you can see, there's no way possible he came through there," Kellom said. "That's where they say he supposed to have come through."

Detroit police say Terrance Kellom had a hammer and sources close to the investigation say Quinn repeatedly told Kellom to drop it. He refused and the agent started shooting.

"You got the graze, the bullet hole in the floor," Kellom said. "One right here. Another bullet hole."

"All these bullet holes were when he was on his knees."

Quinn was a member of a fugitive task force serving an arrest warrant. Terrance Kellom was wanted on armed robbery and weapons charges.

While police say his father allowed the task force inside the home to search for his son, Scott from the Coalition Against Police Brutality says Kellom didn't have much of a choice.

"He asked for the warrant twice," Scott said. "They never gave it to him. But according to Mr. Kellom said, open up the door m.f. or we'll kick it in."

The Kellom family showed FOX 2 the warrant which appears it was signed at 4:37 p.m. Monday.

Detroit police say the shooting happened around 12:45 p.m. - four hours earlier.

Kellom's family says they knew police were looking for Terrance but he did not turn himself in because his girlfriend is pregnant and is due next month.

When asked why they did not urge him to go to police before they came to find him, Scott interjected.

"All that before the fact issue does not speak to the day of," Scott said, "that his parent told him to surrender. He obeyed and this is what he got. He got killed."

FOX 2 asked Detroit police about the warrant, but got referred to the U.S. Marshals which led the operation. They could not comment on the case. 

There was a statement released from Barbara McQuade, U.S. Attorney. It reads:

"Monday's shooting was a tragedy and we offer our deep condolences to the family. Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances.

"In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer. Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."
















Inside the house - Kellom family tells their side of shooting
Fox News - Detroit
Apr 29, 2015 11:19 PM CDT

The family of Terrance Kellom tells their side of the shooting that happened during a raid on Monday.





















ICE agent involved in deadly shooting faced weapons charges
Jonathan Carlson
11:00 pm, Apr 29, 2015
ABC News - Detroit
http://www.wxyz.com/news/ice-agent-involved-in-deadly-shooting-faced-weapons-charges














DETROIT (WXYZ) - The ICE agent, now under investigation for repeatedly shooting and killing a Detroit man, has retained an attorney, the 7 Action News Investigators have learned.

We have also learned Agent Mitchell Quinn, a former Detroit Police officer, faced weapons charges seven years ago.

ICE declined to comment on the charges, which were later dismissed. Quinn was hired by the federal agency shortly after the incident that led to those charges. According to records, Quinn was accused of putting a gun to his wife's head in February of 2008.

According to court documents obtained by the Action News Investigators, Quinn was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and weapons charges, both separate counts. Both were dismissed due to a lack of evidence.

Quinn is now facing questions after the death of fugitive Terrance Kellom, 20, during a warrant raid in Detroit. He claimed Kellom was armed with a hammer, something his family denies.

7 Action News went to the agent's home today for a comment, but no one answered the door.
















Cops praised, criticized at meeting after ICE shooting
George Hunter
The Detroit News 
8 p.m. EDT April 29, 2015


Detroit — Police were both praised and criticized during an emotional meeting Wednesday between leaders of several law enforcement agencies and community members concerned and outraged about the shooting death of armed robbery suspect Terrance Kellom.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn on Monday shot and killed Kellom, 20, during a raid in a home in the 9500 block of Evergreen. Police say Kellom, who was wanted for the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man, lunged at the officer with a hammer.

Kellom's father, who saw the shooting, disputes the police's story, insisting his son didn't have a hammer. The incident is being investigated by Detroit police and the Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General.


The day of the shooting, Detroit police Chief James Craig promised to hold a community forum within 48 hours. Wednesday's gathering at Grace Community Church, on West Chicago just around the corner from the Kellom home, also included officials from several federal agencies.

"This is never easy," said Craig. "Any time a police officer has to use deadly force, it's not easy. We're in a high-risk occupation ... and sometimes officers have to make a split-second decision to use deadly force."

Several times during the two-hour meeting, rioting in Ferguson, Missouri, and Baltimore was brought up.

"When I look at Ferguson and Baltimore, that's not Detroit," Craig said.

Craig promised to keep residents informed about the progress of the investigation into Kellom's death. "You deserve to know," he said.

Quinn is part of the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, a multi-jurisdictional task force coordinated by U.S. Marshal Robert Grubbs, who told the audience of more than 100: "We shouldn't rush to judgment on either side. The truth will come to light."
Rebecca Adducci, special agent in charge of ICE, expressed condolences to the Kellom family and to Quinn.

"My heart breaks for what happened," she said, her voice cracking.

After presentations by the law enforcement officials, community members lined up to ask questions — and, in some cases, hurl accusations.

One woman, an Eastern Michigan University student who said her name was Crystal, but declined to give her last name, berated police for advising young people not to cuss during a protest outside the shooting scene Monday.

"Those are the words they know," she said. "They come from a failing school system, so if those are the words they know, they should be able to use them."

Craig said he plans to hold a youth conference in the near future to discuss how to better work with young people.

Valerie Anderson said she's more concerned about crime than police brutality.

"My son was killed in 2002," she said. "I lost a brother (who was killed during an armed robbery). I lost a nephew. It's the crime right now I'm concerned about."

After the meeting, Erik Shelley said he wasn't impressed.

"It was a very effective infomercial for the cops," he said. "Everyone clapped in all the right places."

But resident Rita Johnson, a member of the Franklin Park Neighborhood Association, said she appreciated the opportunity to talk with police.

"We still respect our police officers," she said. "I think this (meeting) helped people to vent, and I hope we can do it again."

Craig said he plans another another community meeting.

















ICE agent once accused of 
threatening wife with gun
By Tresa Baldas and Gina Damron
Detroit Free Press
5:39 p.m. EDT April 29, 2015
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/04/29/ice-agent-identified-fatal-shooting/26571925/


The federal agent who shot and killed a Detroit man during a raid has a blemished record and controversial past, including accusations that he once pulled a gun on his ex-wife and pointed it at her head in front of their son, records show.

The latter accusation triggered criminal charges -- though the case was dismissed. And he was once named in an excessive force lawsuit alongside the controversial ex-Detroit Police Sgt. Eugene Brown, whose fatal on-duty shootings cost the city $7.5 million.

These are some of the details that have surfaced about U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn, the man at the center of Monday's shooting of 20-year-old Terrance Kellom, who was killed as a task force tried to arrest him.

Quinn -- a former Detroit police officer who was suspended in 2008 following the alleged domestic violence incident -- was the one who fired the fatal shots, multiple sources told the Free Press. The shooting is under investigation and Quinn is on administrative leave.

It's not the first time he's faced scrutiny for how he handled his gun.

According to court records and Detroit Police Commission meeting minutes, Quinn was charged in 2008 with assault with a dangerous weapon and felony firearm for allegedly holding his gun to his wife's head. The case was dismissed in 2008 when a judge concluded there wasn't enough evidence to go to trial.

According to Board of Police Commissioners meeting minutes, Quinn's wife -- also a Detroit police officer -- claimed that her husband pointed his department-issued gun at her head during a verbal argument about several emails.

"When (she) attempted to make a 911 call on her cellular phone, Officer Mitchell Quinn grabbed her phone and broke it," the BOPC minutes state. " Later, Officer Mitchell Quinn then threw his gun against the wall."

The day after the alleged incident, the couple's son "told the Wayne County Prosecutor's office that he observed his father point a gun at his mother and push her down," the minutes show.

On Feb. 20, 2008, Quinn was suspended from the DPD. That same day, he was arraigned in 36th District Court on assault charges stemming from the domestic incident, but the case was dismissed a month later.

According to court records, Quinn's wife testified against him at a preliminary examination, but 36th District Judge Beverly J. Hayes concluded there was insufficient evidence to take the case to trial and dismissed it. The judge also declared the couple's then 5-year-old son incompetent to take the witness stand, so the child's testimony was inadmissible.

Months after he was suspended from the DPD, Quinn took a job with ICE.

His attorney in the assault case, Randall Upshaw, was not available for comment today. Quinn's ex-wife could not be reached.

Quinn also ran for Wayne County sheriff in 2004 -- four years after the city paid about $20,000 to settle a lawsuit against Quinn and Brown alleging, among other things, excessive force.

According to the lawsuit, Quinn "stood idly by" while his partner assaulted a man sitting in a parked car with three friends. The plaintiff alleged in his lawsuit that Quinn's partner, Eugene Brown, placed him in a head lock, choked him and stated 'I'll snap your (expletive) head by." All while this was happening, the lawsuit claims, Quinn did nothing, but instead "ordered the remaining passengers" from the vehicle for no reason and then "conducted a pat-down search" of the individuals with his partner.

Attorney Steven Budaj, who represented the plaintiff, recalled the case settling for about $20,000. He declined comment on the suit, noting it was years ago and that he doesn't recall all the details about it.

ICE declined comment today on Quinn. On Tuesday, ICE issued a statement saying that the federal agent involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave. The agency did not name the agent, stating only that he has "no history of adverse personnel actions" while working with ICE, and that he was a decorated 12-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department before working for the federal government.

Quinn was among members of a joint task force that executed an arrest warrant for Kellom, a habitual offender who had fled while on probation and was wanted as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza delivery driver. Court records show that Kellom has a lengthy criminal history, dating to when he was 14.

Police have said that Quinn opened fire because Kellom came at him with a hammer.

"The agent felt that he was in imminent danger because the suspect was advancing on him in possession of this hammer," Detroit Police Chief James Craig said on Monday. "He responded to overcome the suspect's actions and used deadly force."

The victim's father has denied that assertion, maintaining his son was unarmed.

"My son died with clenched fists. He didn't have a hammer. ... They assassinated my son," the victim's father, Kevin Kellom, said during a peace rally Tuesday on the city's west side. "My son did not deserve this."

The case has drawn scrutiny from the public, Washington lawmakers, local police and the U.S. Attorney's Office, which is monitoring the situation.

"Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances. In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer," U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said following the shooting. "Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."

















Forum held by Detroit police on Kellom shooting, community relations
Fox News - Detroit
Apr 29, 2015 5:26 PM CDT
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/clip/11442273/forum-held-by-detroit-police-on-kellom-shooting-community-relations


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Detroit Police Chief James Craig holds forum on Kellom shooting, police relations
Apr 29, 2015 5:13 PM CDT
Fox News - Detroit
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/clip/11442163/detroit-police-chief-james-craig-holds-forum-on-kellom-shooting-police-relations
















New information revealed about ICE agent and victim in fatal shooting
Posted: Apr 29, 2015 4:39 PM CDT
Updated: Apr 29, 2015 5:01 PM CDT
By Dave Spencer
Fox News - Detroit
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/28934515/new-information-revealed-about-ice-agent-and-victim-in-fatal-shooting




DETROIT (WJBK) - More details are emerging about Terrance Kellom and the federal agent who shot him to death April 27.

Questions continue to swirl following Kellom's death in a confrontation with a Detroit fugitive arrest task force raid at a house at Evergreen and West Chicago. Kellom allegedly came at the officer with a hammer, something his family denies. 

FOX 2 has new information on the officer that allegedly killed Kellom, Mitchell Quinn.  

In 2008 Quinn was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon. The charges were later dropped before he was hired by Immigration Customs and Enforcement.

As for Kellom's past, he has drug charges dating back to 2012 as well as concealed weapons charges the following year which he pleaded guilty to.

According to police, Kellom was wanted on warrants for carjacking and robbery. 

Those who cared for him say his past and mistakes were no reason to be killed.

FOX 2: "What would be justice in this case?"

"If the police who did that to him get locked up," said Janay Williams, the mother of Kellom's children.

As for the investigation into the shooting, Quinn has been placed on leave and sources say they plan to interview the officer on Friday.

While investigations are ongoing, Kellom's family, friends and those in the community are trying to come to grips with his death.

"I don't even know where to go from here to be honest," Williams said.

Williams is pregnant with Lellum's daughter. Her family says it's a tough reality for Kellom's children who will now grow up without a father.

"He was here everyday with his son," said Adrienne Williams, the aunt of Kellom's children. "His son knows who he is. His son knows his face. His son talks about the police, his son is terrified."

"He didn't deserve what he got from the police."
The family of Terrance Kellom released  statement Wednesday afternoon saying that the search warrant was found by Kevin Kellom, Terrance's father, after he returned home from the hospital. Kevin Kellom claims the search warrant was signed three hours after the shooting occurred.

The full statement is as follows: 

The day after his son was gunned down by an Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer, Kevin Kellom spoke publicly about the shooting in front of his home on Detroit's Northwest side. 

"They brought my son down the stairs and executed him in my face. My son died with a clenched fist, no hammer. My son reached for me and was shot twice in the chest. (After that), eight more shots rang out."

Kevin's son, Terrence was wanted for parole violation on a 2010 concealed weapons charge. The ICE agent was working on a multi-jurisdictional task force with Detroit police at the time of the shooting. When they came for Terrence, Kevin said he asked to see a search warrant but the officers entered without showing him one. 

When he returned home from the hospital after his son had been declared dead, Kevin found a search warrant that police left for him.  However, he said it had been signed 3 hours after the shooting occurred.

The news came at a press conference organized by the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality.  It featured speakers from the Franklin Park Association, Baptist Pastors Council and Michigan United. Spokesman Ron Scott said:"Terrence Kellom will have justice.  We will not stop until he has justice and this neighborhood can be free." 

While ICE officers are an unusual sight in Northwest Detroit, they are all too common on the city's Southwest side where many undocumented residents live. 

 "In California and Texas, so many of our people are beaten up and there's no record." said Mary Turner of Michigan United. "What's happened at the Southern border is coming to the Northern border too."

















Detroit police host public meeting after 
ICE shooting
George Hunter
The Detroit News
3:15 p.m. EDT April 29, 2015
http://www.detroitnews.com/story/news/local/detroit-city/2015/04/29/detroit-police-public-meeting-ice-shooting/26587573/


Detroit — The city’s police chief plans to meet Wednesday with community members who want answers in the wake of this week’s fatal shooting of an armed robbery suspect by a federal agent.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn on Monday shot and killed fugitive Terrance Kellom, 20, during a raid in a home in the 9500 block of Evergreen. Police say Kellom, who was wanted for the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man, lunged at the officer with a hammer.

Kellom’s father, who saw the shooting, disputed the police’s story.

“They assassinated my son, right in front of me,” Kevin Kellom said. “There was no hammer. I let them into my house. We were cooperating. They didn’t need to shoot my son.”

Amid community concern about the shooting, Detroit Police Chief James Craig has scheduled a 4 p.m. meeting at Grace Community Church, 20021 W. Chicago.

Quinn, a former Detroit Police officer was criminally charged seven years ago after allegedly pointing his department-issued handgun at the head of his wife, also a Detroit cop, during a fight over emails. Quinn was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon, but the charges were dropped.

Craig said Kevin Kellom also is wanted by police for a fraud case, but he said he decided not to arrest him immediately.

“We can always pick him up later; we decided to let him properly grieve for his son.,” Craig told The Detroit News on Monday.

A rally outside the shooting scene Tuesday was peaceful, but community members demanded answers.

“It was my nephew who was shot, but I’m telling you all police are not bad,” said Shannon Sailes, 48. “The police can’t win; if they’re here, people say they’re the bad guy, and if they don’t show up, people say they’re the bad guy. I’m upset about what happened, but let’s have an investigation and let the police do their jobs.”

Bobbie Davis of the Franklin Park Neighborhood Association, pointed out that the protests have been peaceful. “We haven’t had one bottle thrown,” she said “We’re standing behind DPD. We have some good police officers here. We’re not going to burn down our city; we’re going to build up our city. We’re going to show we’re not savages.

“But we’re going to demand answers,” Davis said. “Let things be handled by the Justice Department.”
















WATCH: DPD chief speaks at forum on Terrance Kellom shooting
Posted: Apr 29, 2015 2:53 PM CDT
Updated: Apr 29, 2015 6:42 PM CDT
By myFOXDetroit.com Staff
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/28933198/watch-dpd-chief-speaks-at-forum-on-terrance-kellom-shooting


Detroit Police Chief James Craig held a forum at 4 p.m. regarding the fatal shooting Terrance Kellom.

Kellom was shot to death by a federal agent when being served a warrant at his house on Evergreen and West Chicago.

He allegedly came at the agent with a hammer before being shot multiple times.


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Detroit police chief out front following deadly shooting of fugitive by federal agent
By Gus Burns
MLive
April 29, 2015 at 2:45 PM,
Updated April 29, 2015 at 3:17 PM
http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2015/04/detroit_police_chief_to_addres_1.html#incart_story_package




DETROIT, MI -- Detroit Police Chief James Craig hasn't shied away from the public following the fatal shooting of 20-year-old Terrance Kellom during an attempted arrest in his father's west Detroit home Monday.

Craig is hosting a town hall-style meeting with the public at 4 p.m. Wednesday.

It was a federal Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agent who shot Kellom during the attempted arrest.

Detroit police weren't directly involved, but Craig responded to the scene to speak with neighbors and promised Kellom's family a timely and thorough investigation.

On Tuesday, more than 100 gathered near the shooting site for a press conference led by Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality founder Ron Scott, and followed with a march.

Deputy Chief Rene Hall, along with the district's three community police officers, attended Tuesday's rally.

Numerous other officers were present to maintain order

"I think if you look around, most of the people here are peaceful," Hall said. "You have a few agitators here and there, but for the most part people just want to be heard ... and we respect that.

" ... Chief Craig has done a phenomenal job ... to ensure that our relationship with the community is one that is genuine and its every day, not just in a critical situation."

Two members of the Detroit 300, an anti-violence organization, who asked not to be named, said they are happy the chief is out in public and not leading from behind a desk.

Several people at the rally said they want government officials to explain what happened, something that so far has not been happened.

Kellom had open felony arrest warrants related to the March 31 robbery of a pizza delivery driver with a rifle, the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office says.

He also absconded from probation in August stemming from a 2013 concealed firearm felony.

A U.S. Marshals Service-sponsored multi-agency fugitive apprehension team visited the Kellom house on Evergreen near West Chicago with the intent of arresting the 20-year-old.

Craig said it's his understanding Kellom was armed with a hammer, the agent "felt threatened" and opened fire.

Investigators were seen removing a hammer from the home Monday evening, but Kelloms' father, Kevin Kellom, who was across a room when he says he saw the first bullets hit his son's chest and splatter blood on the hallway wall, is adamant his son never had a weapon.

"My son had no hammer," Kevin Kellom said. "That's a lie and I'll put that on my mom and dad's graves ... "


ICE hasn't offered a version of what occurred leading to Kellom being shot multiple times.

They identified the agent, now on administrative leave while the internal investigation is pending, as a 7-year veteran who came to the agency after a "decorated 12-year career with the Detroit Police Department.

He "has no history of adverse personnel actions," ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls said in a statement.

Detroit News reporters Robert Snell and George Hunter, through their, confirmed the agent is 39-year-old ex-Detroit Police Officer Mitchell Quinn.

Full Detroit News story

Quinn, according to online Wayne County court records, was charged with felonious assault and possession of a firearm during commission of a felony in February 2008, but the charges were dismissed in March.

The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office hasn't yet responded to an MLive Detroit request for explanation of the dismissal sent Wednesday afternoon.

Based on meeting minutes from the Detroit Police Commission, Quinn, during a fight with his then-wife, who was also a Detroit police officer, pointed his department-issued handgun at her head.

Quinn ran for Wayne County sheriff in 2004 and finished last among eight candidates, the Detroit News reports.
















ICE agent once accused of 
threatening wife with gun
By Tresa Baldas and Gina Damron
Detroit Free Press
2:28 p.m. EDT April 29, 2015
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/04/29/ice-agent-identified-fatal-shooting/26571925/

Mitchell Quinn is the agent involved in the fatal shooting of a man during a police raid at a Detroit home.

The federal agent who shot and killed a 20-year-old Detroit man during a raid has a troubled past, including an incident in which he was accused of pulling his gun on his ex-wife in front of their son, records show.

The agent at the center of Monday's controversial shooting is U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn, a former Detroit police officer who was suspended in 2008 following a domestic violence incident, multiple sources told the Free Press.

According to court records and Detroit Police Commission meeting minutes, Quinn was charged in 2008 with assault with a dangerous weapon and felony firearm for allegedly holding his gun to his wife's head. The case was dismissed in 2008 when a judge concluded there wasn't enough evidence to go to trial.

That same year, he was suspended from the DPD and months later took a job with ICE.

His attorney in the assault case, Randall Upshaw, was not readily available for comment today. Quinn's ex-wife could not be reached.

Quinn also ran for Wayne County sheriff in 2004.

According to Board of Police Commissioners meeting minutes, Quinn's wife -- also a Detroit police officer -- claimed that her husband pointed his department-issued gun at her head during verbal argument about several emails.

"When (she) attempted to make a 911 call on her cellular phone, Officer Mitchell Quinn grabbed her phone and broke it," the BOPC minutes state. " Later, Officer Mitchell Quinn then threw his gun against the wall."

The day after the alleged incident, the couple's son "told the Wayne County Prosecutor's office that he observed his father point a gun at his mother and push her down," the minutes show.

On Feb. 20, 2008, Quinn was suspended from the DPD. That same day, he was arraigned via video in 36th District Court on assault charges, but the case was later dismissed.

According to court records, Quinn's wife testified against him at a preliminary exam, but 36th District Judge Beverly J. Hayes concluded there was insufficient evidence to take the case to trial and dismissed it on March 4, 2008. The judge also declared the couple's then 5-year-old son incompetent to take the stand, so the child's testimony was considered inadmissible.

Quinn's actions as a Detroit police officer proved costly for the city of Detroit in 2000, when the city paid $20,000 to settle a lawsuit against Quinn and his partner alleging excessive force.

According to the lawsuit, Quinn "stood idly by" while his partner assaulted a man while the man was sitting in a parked car with three friends. The plaintiff alleged in his lawsuit that Quinn's partner, Eugene Brown, placed him in a head lock, choked him and stated 'I'll snap your (expletive) head by." All while this was happening, the lawsuit claims, Quinn did nothing, but instead "ordered the remaining passengers" from the vehicle for no reason and then "conducted a pat-down search" of the individuals with his partner.

Attorney Steven Budaj, who represented the plaintiff, recalled the case settling for about $20,000. He declined comment on the suit, noting it was years ago and that he doesn't recall all the details about it.

ICE declined comment today. On Tuesday, ICE issued a statement saying that the federal agent involved in the shooting has been placed on administrative leave. The agency did not name the agent, stating only that he has "no history of adverse personnel actions" and that he was a decorated 12-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department before working for the federal government.

Quinn became the center of controversy on Monday when he and members of a joint task force executed an arrest warrant for Terrance Kellom, a habitual offender who had fled while on probation. He was wanted as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza delivery driver.

Police have said that Quinn opened fire because Kellom came at him with a hammer.

"The agent felt that he was in imminent danger because the suspect was advancing on him in possession of this hammer," Detroit Police Chief James Craig said on Monday. "He responded to overcome the suspect's actions and used deadly force."

The victim's father has denied that assertion, maintaining his son was unarmed.

"My son died with clenched fists. He didn't have a hammer. ... They assassinated my son," the victim's father, Kevin Kellom, said during a peace rally Tuesday on the city's west side. "My son did not deserve this."

The case has drawn scrutiny from the public, Washington lawmakers, local police and the U.S. Attorney's Office, which is monitoring the situation.

"Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances. In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer," U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said following the shooting. "Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."

















Detroit paid $20k to settle case involving ICE officer who fatally shot Terrance Kellom
Posted By Ryan Felton
Wed, Apr 29, 2015 at 12:08 pm
Metro Times
http://www.metrotimes.com/Blogs/archives/2015/04/29/detroit-paid-20k-to-settle-case-involving-ice-officer-who-fatally-shot-terrance-kellom


The city of Detroit paid $20,000 in 2000 to settle a lawsuit involving a federal agent who shot and killed a 20-year-old Detroit man this week. 

The agent — identified by The Detroit News and Detroit Free Press as U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Officer Mitchell Quinn — fatally shot Terrance Kellom on Monday during a raid by a federal task force. 

In 2000, Quinn was sued by Detroit resident Trevor Pender for an alleged false arrest and assault and battery, according to the complaint.

On Aug 19. 1998, Pender and his friends were sitting in a parked car outside his mother's Detroit home listening to a cassette, the complaint says. "Without warning," it continues, Quinn and his partner, Officer Eugene Brown, approached the vehicle on the driver's side and asked Pender for his license. 

The complaint says Brown ordered Pender to exit his vehicle, put him in a headlock, and said, "I'll snap your fucking neck." When Pender's mother stepped onto her porch to observe the situation, Brown cursed at her and allegedly said, "Just for that, you're going to jail."

While this was going on, Quinn stood idly by, according to the complaint, before ordering the remaining passengers from the vehicle.

"At not time did the Defendants advise the Plaintiff or his friends of the reason for their detainment," the complaint says. "The Defendants then conducted a pat down search of each of the individuals."

Pender was charged with driving without a license, taken to a police station, and held overnight. 

The case was settled shortly after the complaint was filed for $20,000, according to a 2000 MT story. City attorney Krystal Crittendon told MT at the time that Brown approached the car because it was parked in the "middle of the street late at night with rap music blaring."

Crittendon told MT that Brown, Quinn, and Pender signed an agreement releasing all parties of any liability and that "the city settled the case because it was cheaper than litigation, particularly with recent media attention surrounding the police department." Pender's attorney, Steve Budaj, had no comment Wednesday on the case, saying it he couldn't recall every detail.

The Kellom family is no stranger to Officer Brown, according to Ron Scott, spokesperson for the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality. 

Two decades ago, Scott told MT, Kellom's cousin Roderick Carrington was shot dead by Brown under questionable circumstances.

"This family has had tragedy in two decades," Scott said earlier Tuesday.

In 2008, Quinn was criminally charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and felony firearm for allegedly pointing his department-issued handgun at his wife, MT confirmed. The case was later dropped due to insufficient evidence. The charges were first reported by the News Wednesday.

Quinn — who was suspended by the Detroit Police Department following the charges and joined ICE months later in 2008 — fatally shot Detroit resident Kellom on Monday, after a multi-agency federal task force executed a search warrant on his home in the 9500 block of Evergreen. 

An ICE spokesperson declined comment and said he couldn't confirm Quinn was the agent involved in the incident when asked Wednesday by MT. The officer is a lifelong Detroiter and a 12-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department. He since been placed on administrative leave, the spokesperson said. 

Conflicting accounts of what transpired leading up to the death of Kellom have since emerged. 

Terrance Kellom's father, Kevin, offered his side of the story Tuesday to reporters. His account directly conflicts with statements from the Detroit Police Department, which on Tuesday said his son brandished a hammer and approached the ICE agent before he was killed.

"My son died with clenched fists," Kellom, 51, said during a press conference at the corner of W. Chicago and Evergreen on Tuesday, and he didn't have a hammer. To the sounds of car horns occasionally blaring at the corner of a jam-packed intersection, a group of 150-200 gathered outside Kellom's home Tuesday afternoon to call attention to the incident. 

What's more, Kevin Kellom said the shooting happened around 1:40 p.m. Monday, however the search warrant left at his home was signed at 4:35 p.m.

"They made that search warrant after they assassinated my son," Kellom said. 

The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office, says a warrant for Terrance Kellom's arrest for armed robbery was signed on April 2. Kellom allegedly robbed a pizza delivery man on March 31 using a rifle, the prosecutor's office said. 

"We had evidence beyond a reasonable doubt to charge Kellom," said spokeswoman Maria Miller. "After the warrant was signed by a judge the police were authorized to arrest him and take him before a magistrate to be arraigned." 

But, she added, the incident that lead police to his father's house and the circumstances leading to the officers entering the home is currently under investigation.

The Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team task force, which executed the warrant Monday, includes members of the U.S. Marshals Service, Detroit Police Department, Wayne County Sheriff's Office, ICE, and the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. 

Officers entered the home in broad daylight to arrest Kellom, a parole absconder with a felony firearms warrant, said Shanelle Williams, spokesperson for the Detroit Police Department. According to the Michigan Department of Corrections file on Kellom, he fled last August from probation he received for a 2013 concealed weapons offense. 

A Detroit police spokesperson couldn't say how many agents were at the scene of the incident Monday; law enforcement officials at the press conference Tuesday estimated six-to-eight officers executed the search warrant, with more arriving after the shooting occurred. 

According to DPD spokeswoman Williams, Terrance Kellom was "armed with a hammer" and advanced toward the ICE agent before he was shot. Quinn, a seven-year veteran of the agency, was backing away as he shot Kellom — as many as 10 times, neighbors and family members said — dead. 

Kellom was pronounced dead at a hospital shortly after the incident. 

An autopsy showed Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds, the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office said Tuesday. Spokesman Ryan Bridges said the examiner's office ruled Kellom's death a homicide, but declined to say how many gunshots entered his body, or where, citing policy.
















Report: ICE agent involved in fatal Detroit shooting allegedly pointed his gun at wife's head in 2008
Posted By Ryan Felton 
Wed, Apr 29, 2015 at 10:27 am
Detroit Metro Times

The federal agent who fatally shot 20-year-old Terrance Kellom on Monday was charged in 2008 for allegedly pointing his handgun at his wife's head, according to The Detroit News.

The incident sparked a press conference and demonstration near Kellom's home on Detroit's west side. Conflicting accounts have since emerged on what took place inside the home on the 9500 block of Evergreen: Kellom's father says he was unarmed at the time; police say he approached the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer who shot him dead with a hammer.

ICE Officer Mitchell Quinn was criminally charged in February 2008 with assault with a dangerous weapon and felony firearm after "her husband pointed his department-issued weapon at her head during a fight about emails," according to the News, citing minutes of the Detroit Board of Police  Commissioners. 

"I don't know what the truth is and I haven't discussed the matter with him," Quinn's ex-wife told the newspaper. "I just hope that, for everybody, justice can be had and that everybody heals. It's traumatic on both sides."

Charges were dismissed within a month, the News reported.

Quinn is a decorated 12-year Detroit police veteran who joined ICE seven years ago, a spokesman told MT Tuesday.

An autopsy showed Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds, the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office said Tuesday. Spokesman Ryan Bridges said the examiner's office ruled Kellom's death a homicide, but declined to say how many gunshots entered his body, or where, citing policy. 

















Father of man killed in raid: 
'My son did not deserve this'
By Tresa Baldas, Gina Damron and Robert Allen
Detroit Free Press
9:30 a.m. EDT April 29, 2015
















Father of man killed in raid: 
'My son did not deserve this'
By Tresa Baldas, Gina Damron and Robert Allen
Detroit Free Press
9:30 a.m. EDT April 29, 2015
http://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2015/04/28/man-shot-armed-hammer/26508863/

Agent can't be questioned by police until Friday

The father of a Detroit man says his son was unarmed when he was gunned down in his home in the middle of the day.

Police say that the 20-year-old fugitive had a hammer in his hand and charged the federal agent who fired the fatal shots.

Investigators are trying to determine what happened Monday when a joint task force executed an arrest warrant for Terrance Kellom, a habitual offender who had fled while on probation.

Adding to the confusion is the fact that the agent who fired the fatal shot has been sequestered under federal guidelines and cannot be questioned by Detroit police until Friday.

The community, meanwhile, is demanding answers from law enforcement, especially after hearing the father's side of the story.

"My son died with clenched fists. He didn't have a hammer. ... They assassinated my son," the victim's father said during a peace rally Tuesday on the city's west side.
 According to police, a fugitive task force had gone to the house at 1 p.m. Monday to execute the warrant. .

Police said when the task force arrived at the house, Kellom was hiding in the attic. Authorities told the father that they had an arrest warrant for his son, and that the father let them inside, police said.

At some point, police said, Kellom emerged from the attic and came at a federal agent with a hammer. The agent — a seven-year veteran with the U.S. Immigration Customs and Enforcement (ICE) — responded by firing multiple shots and has been placed on administrative leave.

But Kevin Kellom tells a different story.

He said his son was never in hiding, and that police told him they had a search warrant to enter the home. He said the search warrant didn't materialize until three hours after his son was shot and killed.

"I don't understand why my son was killed," Kellom said. "My son did not deserve this."

According to an official close to the investigation, Monday's fatal shooting started out as a domestic situation in which a woman called police earlier in the day to report a domestic dispute of some sort involving Terrance Kellom.

The woman told police where they could find Kellom, who was wanted on a four-count warrant as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza driver, the source said.

That call led a fugitive task force to a home on the city's west side.

During the raid, police said, Kellom advanced toward the ICE agent with a hammer and the agent fired as he was backing up, the source said, noting five people were in the house at the time it happened.

Court records show Kellom is no stranger to law enforcement. His criminal history started when he was only a young teen, court records show.

At age 14, Kellom was accused along with two others with trying to rob a man waiting for a bus. An assault charge was dismissed against Kellom, who pleaded no contest to a city ordinance violation.

He was given probation, but it was revoked in 2009 after he was accused of home invasion. A second-degree home invasion charge was dismissed, and he was found responsible of entering without owner's permission.

Records in Kellom's juvenile court file indicate he had a learning disability and received special education services in school.

As an adult, Kellom had racked up serious charges. In 2012, he was given probation for drug charges. At the time he was shot, he was wanted on armed robbery and weapons charges for a recent incident and had fled from probation he was serving for a 2013 weapons offense.

The federal agent at the center of the controversy, however, has not been interviewed yet by Detroit police because he is off-limits for at least 48 hours under federal policy, a source close to the investigation has said.

The agent — a lifelong Detroiter — has been placed on administrative leave, ICE officials said Tuesday. The agency did not name the agent, stating only that he has "no history of adverse personnel actions" and that he was a decorated 12-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department before working for the federal government.

"The agent felt that he was in imminent danger because the suspect was advancing on him in possession of this hammer," Detroit Police Chief James Craig said. "He responded to overcome the suspect's actions and used deadly force."

U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said her office is monitoring the situation.

"Yesterday's shooting was a tragedy and we offer our deep condolences to the family," McQuade said in a statement. "Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances. In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer. Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."

The Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office said an autopsy showed Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds.

The shooting triggered an emotional response from Detroiters as well as lawmakers on Capitol Hill, both of whom cautioned that law enforcement everywhere is under heightened scrutiny.

"This most recent shooting in Detroit again raises concerns about police-involved shootings in our communities," U.S. Reps. John Conyers Jr. and Brenda Lawrence said in a statement Tuesday. "It is important to note that this incident is under investigation by both Michigan and federal authorities. Our offices will continue to monitor the status of the investigations to ensure that justice is served for the families involved and our community."

In Detroit, the shooting has triggered yet more public animosity toward law enforcement.

Near the shooting scene on Tuesday afternoon, about a dozen people stood near the street waving cardboard signs that read "Who do we call on the police" and "10x = Excessive force," the latter being in reference to the number of shots neighbors are claiming were fired.

Pastor Maurice Hardwick of Detroit, standing on Evergreen with the protesters, said the officials' account of the shooting is "pretty fishy," and he doesn't understand why a man with a hammer would be shot that many times. But he said he's pleased with Craig's response and looks forward to hearing more from him at today's community meeting.

"Give me the facts," Hardwick said. "We want the statements that were taken."

Ron Scott, spokesman for the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, echoed those sentiments.

"In light of national incidents, we find this latest shooting appalling, distressing and despicable that another young black man has to be killed in his house in front of his family with multiple gunshots," Scott said.

The coalition and other groups held a rally Tuesday at at the corner of Evergreen and Chicago, near where Kellom was shot and killed.

The protesters marched to Cody High School, where they denounced police brutality and called on citizens of Detroit to unite and demand accountability from police.

Kellom's family, meanwhile, is struggling to comprehend what happened.

"This family has been hit with loss after loss," said Nikki Horton, Kellom's sister-in-law, who noted Kellom's grandmother, grandfather, uncle and a cousin all died in the past two years.

"There is no way that he would have threatened an officer, especially physically," Horton said. "He was smarter than that. He would never do that, especially in front of his family."

She said Kellom was "in the process of turning his life around."

He had a baby and another one on the way, she said.

"We all got saved recently," Horton said, referring to her Christian beliefs. "And we were encouraging (Kellom) to do the same."
















ICE Agent Involved In Fatal Shooting Previously Faced Criminal Charges As 
Detroit Cop
April 29, 2015 8:36 AM
CBS News - Detroit

DETROIT (WWJ/AP) – A federal agent under investigation for fatally shooting a wanted Detroit man inside a home has been in trouble with the law before — he faced criminal charges seven years ago while working as a Detroit police officer.

A report by the Detroit News says Mitchell Quinn was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and felony firearm in February 2008 after pointing a department-issued handgun at his wife’s head during an argument about emails. His now ex-wife, a fellow Detroit police officer, was uninjured in the incident.

The charges were dismissed, but Quinn left the Detroit Police Department and joined the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency a few months later, ultimately getting assigned to the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team.

Quinn, 39, was part of a task force that was sent to capture 20-year old Terrance Kellom on Monday afternoon. Authorities said Kellom, a habitual offender, had fled while on probation and was wanted as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man.

When agents arrived at a home on Detroit’s west side, in the 9500 block of Evergreen near W. Chicago, Kellom was reportedly hiding inside. When finally confronted by agents, investigators say Kellom was armed with a hammer — though his family members have disputed that. Quinn, “faced with a threat,” fired his weapon at Kellom several times “as [Quinn] was retreating,” according to police.

An autopsy determined that Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds. His death has been classified a homicide, according to the Wayne County Medical Examiner’s Office.
Quinn, a seven-year veteran of ICE who spent 12 years with Detroit police, is on administrative leave during the investigation into the shooting — which is agency policy.

U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said her office will be closely monitoring the investigation by Detroit police.

“Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances,” McQuade said in a statement. “In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer.”

Meantime, the Detroit Police Commissioner has requested that Police Chief James Craig appear before the commission to discuss his department’s role on the fugitive apprehension task force.

“We need to know what the DPD policy on employment of deadly force is and whether the DPD should participate on any task force that may not place a premium on human life,” Commissioner Willie Burton said in a statement. “Be clear. I support our police and I support the effort of law enforcement to make our streets safe for all but we must know what role DPD has with the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team. … We don’t need a Baltimore in Detroit.”

Chief Craig said he plans to hold a community meeting Wednesday at 4 p.m. at Grace Community Church, located at 20021 W. Chicago.

Kellom’s death comes amid a national debate over police conduct, particularly toward black men, since black 18-year-old Michael Brown was killed by a white policeman in Ferguson, Missouri last August. Violence erupted in Baltimore this week over a black man who died there in police custody. Kellom was black, as is the ICE agent who shot him.

“They executed my son in my face,” Kellom’s father, Kevin, said during a rally and protest march on Tuesday. “My son died with a clenched fist, no hammer. My son reached for me and got shot. I want justice, I’m going to get justice. I promised him that, and I’m promising his mother that. I’m not going to stop until I get justice for my son.”

ICE said Monday that Kellom was wanted on armed robbery and weapons charges. He was listed as a probation absconder on the state Corrections website. Kellom was sentenced to probation in December 2013 after pleading guilty to an October 2013 attempted carrying a concealed weapon case.
















Federal officer in Detroit shooting has checkered past
George Hunter and Robert Snell
The Detroit News 
8:12 a.m. EDT April 29, 2015

Detroit — The federal officer who shot and killed a Detroit man Monday was criminally charged seven years ago after allegedly pointing his department-issued handgun at his wife's head, The News has learned.

Details about the professional career of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn emerged Tuesday, one day after Quinn shot and killed allegedly hammer-wielding fugitive Terrance Kellom, 20, during a raid in Detroit.

The fatal shooting raised tensions in the community over police conduct in light of recent fatal shootings nationwide and triggered a large protest Tuesday in Detroit. U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said she is watching developments closely amid an investigation that includes the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General, Detroit Police and Michigan State Police.

Quinn, 39, is a former Detroit police officer who ran for Wayne County sheriff in 2004. The Detroit resident finished dead last out of eight candidates in the Democratic primary won by current Wayne County Executive Warren Evans.

Four years later, in February 2008, Quinn was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon after an incident involving his wife, a fellow Detroit police officer.

"I don't know what the truth is and I haven't discussed the matter with him," said Quinn's ex-wife, who asked that her name be withheld to protect her son. "I just hope that, for everybody, justice can be had and that everybody heals. It's traumatic on both sides."

Quinn's ex-wife complained that her husband pointed his department-issued weapon at her head during a fight about emails, according to minutes of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners.

"When (she) attempted to make a 911 call on her cellular phone, Officer Mitchell Quinn grabbed her phone and broke it," according to meeting minutes. "Later, Officer Mitchell Quinn then threw his gun against the wall."

Quinn, a decorated, 12-year Detroit police veteran, was suspended and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and felony firearm, according to 36th District Court records.

Charges were dismissed in March 2008. Six months later, in September 2008, Quinn joined ICE and was assigned to the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team.

The exclusive fugitive team is staffed with members from the U.S. Marshals Service, U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and Detroit Police, and targets local, state and federal fugitives.

The team's latest operation turned tragic Monday.

Around 1:13 p.m., the team arrived at Kellom's home in the 9500 block of Evergreen.

The team targeted Kellom because he was a fugitive who fled from probation in August for carrying concealed weapons.

Kellom allegedly brandished a rifle and stole cash and pizzas from a 39-year-old delivery man March 31 on the east side of Detroit, according to the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office.

When the fugitive team arrived at his house Monday, he was wielding a hammer, Detroit Police Chief James Craig told The News.

"The ICE agent was met by the suspect who I was told presented a threat, and the officer used lethal force," Craig said.

There was no evidence Kellom had a gun, he said. The agent fired his weapon as he was retreating, Craig added.

Kellom died at a local hospital after being hit with an undetermined number of gunshots.

Kevin Kellom describes shooting of his son Terrance by federal agent. George Hunter/The Detroit News

Ryan Bridges, spokesman for the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office, said the autopsy on Kellom has been completed. His cause of death has been classified as homicide as the result of multiple gunshot wounds.

Following the shooting, Quinn was placed on paid administrative leave.

ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls said the officer has a clean record with the federal agency.

As several dozen people staged a peaceful protest outside the house where the shooting occurred, Kellom's relatives were inside, offering mixed reactions about the police — and a different version of what happened.

"It was my nephew who was shot, but I'm telling you all police are not bad," said Shannon Sailes, 48. "The police can't win; if they're here, people say they're the bad guy, and if they don't show up, people say they're the bad guy.

"I'm upset about what happened, but let's have an investigation and let the police do their jobs."

Kellom's father, however, had a different reaction.

"I can't stand the police," he said. "They assassinated my son, right in front of me. That was an execution, right in my face."

Kellom said his son didn't have a hammer, as police claimed. "My son clenched his fists and said, 'Daddy.' Then he fell to his knees, and they shot him 10 times. He didn't deserve that. There was no hammer. I let them into my house. We were cooperating. They didn't need to shoot my son."

Protesters sometimes shouted, but the gathering was peaceful.
"We haven't had one bottle thrown," said Bobbie Davis of the Franklin Park Neighborhood Association. "We're standing behind DPD. We have some good police officers here. We're not going to burn down our city; we're going to build up our city. We're going to show we're not savages.

"But we're going to demand answers," Davis said. "Let things be handled by the Justice Department."

Detroit Police Commissioner Willie E. Burton said Tuesday he will notify other commission members about convening a special meeting with Craig to discuss the role of the Police Department on the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team.

"The Detroit Police Commission was established by the voters of Detroit, as clearly delineated in the Detroit City Charter, to serve as a bridge of accountability between the citizens of Detroit and their Police Department. We need to know what the DPD policy on employment of deadly force is and whether the DPD should participate on any task force that may not place a premium on human life," said Burton.

"Be clear: I support our police and I support the effort of law enforcement to make our streets safe for all but we must know what role DPD has with the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, who is in charge and what is the DPD policy on employment of deadly force. We don't need a Baltimore in Detroit."
McQuade on Tuesday called the shooting a "tragedy" and said her office is monitoring developments.

"Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances," McQuade said in a statement. "In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer. Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."

The incident Monday happened hours before Baltimore rioters threw rocks and other items at police and burned several buildings in response to the death of Freddie Gray, who died while in police custody.

Ron Scott, director of the Coalition Against Police Brutality, criticized the Detroit shooting.

"In light of national incidents, we find this latest shooting appalling, distressing, and despicable that another young black man has to be killed in his house in front of his family with multiple gunshots," Scott said.
















Report: ICE Agent Who Shot Suspect in Raid Criminally Charged in 2008
New details emerging about the federal agent who fired multiple shots and killed suspect during a raid.
By BETH DALBEY (Patch Staff)
April 29, 2015 
Grosse Pointe Patch

Several dozen demonstrators gathered Tuesday in a peaceful protest of the shooting of 20-year-old Terrance Kellom by federal agent Mitchell Quinn, who was suspended by the Detroit Police Department in 2008 amid allegations that he held a gun to his ex-wife’s head. (Photo by @JoelReinstein via Twitter)

A federal agent who pumped multiple bullets into a 20-year-old Detroit man Monday was suspended as a Detroit police officer in 2008 after he was criminally charged in a domestic violence incident after he allegedly pulled a gun on his ex-wife, according to news reports.

The agent, identified as U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn, shot a hammer-wielding suspect during a raid Monday in a case that is being closely watched nationally amid racial unrest in Baltimore, MD, and elsewhere in the country.

An autopsy showed Terrance Kellom, was shot multiple times by Quinn, who was working on a fugitive apprehension task force. Detroit Police Chief James Craig said Monday that Kellom was advancing on Quinn armed with a hammer – an assertion the victim’s father denies – and the agent “responded to overcome the suspect’s actions and used deadly force.”

The Detroit News and the Detroit Free Press report that Quinn, 39, was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon after he allegedly held a gun to the head of his wife, also Detroit police officer at the time. The charges were dismissed when a judge ruled there wasn’t enough evidence to take the case to trial, and the two have since divorced.

The woman, who spoke to The Detroit News on the condition of anonymity to protect her son, said she doesn’t have details about what happened during the raid and hasn’t discussed it with her ex-husband.

“I just hope that, for everybody, justice can be had and that everybody heals,” she said. “It’s traumatic on both sides.”

Several dozen protesters gathered outside the house where Terrance Kellom was killed Monday. The demonstration was a sharp contrast to rioting in Baltimore, MD, over the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody.

“We haven’t had one bottle thrown,” said Bobbie Davis, a spokesman for the Franklin Park Neighborhood Association, according to a report in The Detroit News.”We’re standing behind (the Detroit Police Department). We have some good police officers here. We’re not going to burn down our city; we’re going to build up our city. We’re going to show we’re not savages.

“But we’re going to demand answers,” Davis said. “Let things be handled by the Justice Department.”

U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said her office, along with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General, Detroit Police and the Michigan State Police, are investigating.

According to Board of Police Commissioners meeting minutes, Quinn’s wife said he held his department-issued handgun to her head as the two argued over emails. When she attempted a 911 call on her cellular phone, Quinn grabbed and broke it, according to the minutes, and then threw his gun against the wall.

The couple’s son “told the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office that he observed his father point a gun at his mother and push her down,” the minutes show.

Quinn joined ICE and was assigned to the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team in September 2008, just six months after the charges were dismissed.

It was in that capacity that he shot Kellom Monday. ICE had declined to comment on the situation, other than to say in a statement issued earlier this week that the decorated 12-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department had “no history of adverse personnel actions,” the two newspapers said.

Quinn’s law enforcement career also includes a failed run for Wayne County sheriff in 2004, when he finished last among eight candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for the office.

















Questions about federal officer after 
Detroit shooting
George Hunter and Robert Snell
The Detroit News 
11:52 p.m. EDT April 28, 2015

Detroit —The federal officer who shot and killed a Detroit man Monday was criminally charged seven years ago after allegedly pointing his department-issued handgun at his wife's head, The News has learned.

Details about the professional career of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Officer Mitchell Quinn emerged Tuesday, one day after Quinn shot and killed allegedly hammer-wielding fugitive Terrance Kellom, 20, during a raid in Detroit.

The fatal shooting raised tensions in the community over police conduct in light of recent fatal shootings nationwide and triggered a large protest Tuesday in Detroit. U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said she is watching developments closely amid an investigation that includes the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General, Detroit Police and Michigan State Police.

Quinn, 39, is a former Detroit police officer who ran for Wayne County sheriff in 2004. The Detroit resident finished dead last out of eight candidates in the Democratic primary won by current Wayne County Executive Warren Evans.

Four years later, in February 2008, Quinn was charged with assault with a dangerous weapon after an incident involving his wife, a fellow Detroit police officer.

"I don't know what the truth is and I haven't discussed the matter with him," said Quinn's ex-wife, who asked that her name be withheld to protect her son. "I just hope that, for everybody, justice can be had and that everybody heals. It's traumatic on both sides."

Quinn's ex-wife complained that her husband pointed his department-issued weapon at her head during a fight about emails, according to minutes of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners.

"When (she) attempted to make a 911 call on her cellular phone, Officer Mitchell Quinn grabbed her phone and broke it," according to meeting minutes. "Later, Officer Mitchell Quinn then threw his gun against the wall."

Quinn, a decorated, 12-year Detroit police veteran, was suspended and charged with assault with a dangerous weapon and felony firearm, according to 36th District Court records.

Charges were dismissed in March 2008. Six months later, in September 2008, Quinn joined ICE and was assigned to the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team.

The exclusive fugitive team is staffed with members from the U.S. Marshals Service, U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and Detroit Police, and targets local, state and federal fugitives.

The team's latest operation turned tragic Monday.

Around 1:13 p.m., the team arrived at Kellom's home in the 9500 block of Evergreen.

The team targeted Kellom because he was a fugitive who fled from probation in August for carrying concealed weapons.

Kellom allegedly brandished a rifle and stole cash and pizzas from a 39-year-old delivery man March 31 on the east side of Detroit, according to the Wayne County Prosecutor's Office.

When the fugitive team arrived at his house Monday, he was wielding a hammer, Detroit Police Chief James Craig told The News.

"The ICE agent was met by the suspect who I was told presented a threat, and the officer used lethal force," Craig said.

There was no evidence Kellom had a gun, he said. The agent fired his weapon as he was retreating, Craig added.

Kellom died at a local hospital after being hit with an undetermined number of gunshots.


Kevin Kellom descibes shooting of his son Terrance by federal agent. 
George Hunter/The Detroit News

Ryan Bridges, spokesman for the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office, said the autopsy on Kellom has been completed. His cause of death has been classified as homicide as the result of multiple gunshot wounds.

Following the shooting, Quinn was placed on paid administrative leave.

ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls said the officer has a clean record with the federal agency.

As several dozen people staged a peaceful protest outside the house where the shooting occurred, Kellom's relatives were inside, offering mixed reactions about the police — and a different version of what happened.

"It was my nephew who was shot, but I'm telling you all police are not bad," said Shannon Sailes, 48. "The police can't win; if they're here, people say they're the bad guy, and if they don't show up, people say they're the bad guy.

"I'm upset about what happened, but let's have an investigation and let the police do their jobs."

Kellom's father, however, had a different reaction.

"I can't stand the police," he said. "They assassinated my son, right in front of me. That was an execution, right in my face."

Kellom said his son didn't have a hammer, as police claimed. "My son clenched his fists and said, 'Daddy.' Then he fell to his knees, and they shot him 10 times. He didn't deserve that. There was no hammer. I let them into my house. We were cooperating. They didn't need to shoot my son."

Protesters sometimes shouted, but the gathering was peaceful.




"We haven't had one bottle thrown," said Bobbie Davis of the Franklin Park Neighborhood Association. "We're standing behind DPD. We have some good police officers here. We're not going to burn down our city; we're going to build up our city. We're going to show we're not savages.

"But we're going to demand answers," Davis said. "Let things be handled by the Justice Department."

Detroit Police Commissioner Willie E. Burton said Tuesday he will notify other commission members about convening a special meeting with Craig to discuss the role of the Police Department on the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team.

"The Detroit Police Commission was established by the voters of Detroit, as clearly delineated in the Detroit City Charter, to serve as a bridge of accountability between the citizens of Detroit and their Police Department. We need to know what the DPD policy on employment of deadly force is and whether the DPD should participate on any task force that may not place a premium on human life," said Burton.

"Be clear: I support our police and I support the effort of law enforcement to make our streets safe for all but we must know what role DPD has with the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team, who is in charge and what is the DPD policy on employment of deadly force. We don't need a Baltimore in Detroit."




McQuade on Tuesday called the shooting a "tragedy" and said her office is monitoring developments.

"Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances," McQuade said in a statement. "In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer. Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."

The incident Monday happened hours before Baltimore rioters threw rocks and other items at police and burned several buildings in response to the death of Freddie Gray, who died while in police custody.

Ron Scott, director of the Coalition Against Police Brutality, criticized the Detroit shooting.

"In light of national incidents, we find this latest shooting appalling, distressing, and despicable that another young black man has to be killed in his house in front of his family with multiple gunshots," Scott said.
















Protestors take to the street in wake of Monday's fatal shooting of a man by an ICE agent
Simon Shaykhet
11:24 PM, Apr 28, 2015
5:28 AM, Apr 29, 2015
ABC News - Detroit
http://www.wxyz.com/news/region/detroit/protestors-take-to-the-street-in-wake-of-mondays-fatal-shooting-of-a-man-by-an-ice-agent









DETROIT (WXYZ) - From violence on the streets in Baltimore, to a peaceful protest right here in Detroit, the community is voicing it's anger over the death of a young father shot and killed by a federal agent during his arrest.

United in their voice, these protesters are on a mission.

The crowds grew at Evergreen and Chicago. The tension felt by police and parents with small children.

The demonstration was over the death of 20-year-old Terrence Kellom, who was shot multiple times and killed by an ICE agent at his home Monday.

Terrence was a young father, with a second child on the way.

The feds say Kellom was wanted for armed robbery and gun charges and he was a parole absconder.

Detroit police say they were told Kellom came at the agent with a hammer.

Now, federal prosecutors are pledging to closely monitor findings of an investigation into what happened.

Meantime, protestors have been clear in saying law enforcement has claimed too many lives and enough is enough.
















New details emerge in ICE agent's fatal shooting of Detroit man
Posted: Apr 28, 2015 9:35 PM CDT
Updated: Apr 28, 2015 9:49 PM CDT
By Taryn Asher
Fox 2 News - Detroit




Fox 2 News Headlines

FOX 2 has learned more about the moments that led up to that shooting that killed Terrance Kellom by a federal agent.

Kellom, 20, was wanted for armed robbery and weapons charges and considered dangerous.

According to police sources there were several circumstances surrounding the shooting that Terrance's father Kevin Kellom, left out.

When the Fugitive Apprehension Team showed up with a warrant to arrest Kellom, sources close to the investigation say he was hiding in the attic. He eventually dropped through the ceiling and came after the ICE agent with a hammer, yelling.

The ICE agent who was also African-American, retreated and told  Kellom to drop the hammer, which is considered a deadly weapon, multiple times. When Kellom refused the agent, he fired his weapon. 
According to the medical examiners report, the agent shot Kellom multiple times.

His father Kevin Kellom had one story - but according to police sources - it's not all of it.

"All of a sudden I hear a commotion," Kevin Kellom said. "Police offices say 'Freeze, I will kill you. I will blow your m.f. brains out. Show me your hands.' 

""I said 'Titi please lay down.' He reaches his hands down and says 'But dad,' and I swear as soon as he said 'But dad,' two shots ring out. The bullets hit my son in the chest."

The distraught father of Terrance Kellom angered protesters with his account of what happened when the agents entered his Detroit house on Evergreen near West Chicago and shot and killed his son.

"His hands went from open to clutched and shaking. His last two words my son said 'Daddy, daddy.'"

Kevin Kellom, who refused to answer FOX 2's follow-up questions late this evening, maintains his son never had a hammer in his hand. But Detroit police confirms that hammer has been taken into evidence and is being tested for fingerprints.

"It's not a question of black on black," said activist Ron Scott. "It's a question of force on person. And this is why people in this county are upset. If you made a mistake, take responsibility." 

About 150 protesters upset with another young black man dying at the hands of a police officer walked the streets in front of the westside Detroit home on Evergreen at West Chicago where it happened.

Detroit police were able to keep it under control, but at the same time are preparing for the unknown.

In the wake of the violence in Baltimore, the police department issued a warning to law enforcement in certain cities including Detroit that some gangs have entered into a partnership to take out law enforcement officers.

Federal investigators are conducting an internal investigation and FOX 2 is told that Detroit police is handling the criminal investigation.
















Detroit residents march peacefully day after federal agent kills man during raid
By Gus Burns 
MLive
April 28, 2015 at 8:00 PM


DETROIT, MI -- Detroit residents and activists exhibited anger, sadness, frustration and confusion in the wake of the fatal shooting of a wanted 20-year-old fugitive, Terrance Kellom, by a federal agent Monday.

Terrance Kellom, a probation absconder with an open arrest warrant for the March 31 armed robbery of a pizza delivery man, was shot multiple times by an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agent inside his father's west Detroit home.

More than 200 people gathered near the shooting site and marched to nearby Cody High School Tuesday evening. There was a large Detroit police presence and some officers joined in a handheld prayer with residents before the march began.

"Black Lives Matter," said numerous signs. One read: "Save our Youth! Jail killer cops, no gang squad."

Expletive "the police," said another.

On the sidewalk, an elementary-school-age girl in a burgundy, plaid skirt wrote on a white piece of poster board with black marker: "It needs to be a better world for us."

Many talked about the shooting among themselves in the crowd.

"If you feel that strongly that you're afraid for your life that you need to shoot someone, maybe you shouldn't be a police officer," one woman said.

"It's our duty to fight for our freedom," a man at the center of the gathering chanted, and the crowd recited. "We have nothing to lose but our chains."

Terrance Kellom's father, Kevin Kellom, disputes claims made by Detroit Police Chief James Craig that his son was "armed with a hammer," as the chief told the Detroit News.

"My son had no hammer," Kevin Kellom told MLive Detroit. "That's a lie and I'll put that on my mom and dad's graves ... "

Kevin Kellom's recounts the shooting
ICE hasn't released a statement about what happened, but confirmed there was a fatal shooting now being investigated internally.

The shooter is a seven-year veteran of ICE "with no history of adverse personnel actions," who previously worked as a "decorated" Detroit police officer for 12 years, ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls said in a prepared statement Tuesday.

The agent is currently on administrative leave.

"I don't think you can be the police, and I'm out here doing something, and you just be the judge, the jury and the funeral director," said a Detroit 300 member named Rose, who declined to give her last name. "You can't be all three of those wrapped up in one."

She said police want citizens to stop the "no-snitch" code, and they need to do the same

"The good ones who don't step forward and keep that wall of silence, it's an indictment on the whole department," said another Detroit 300 member, who also declined to give his name. "These people act with impunity and don't say anything; you're just as bad, you're complicit."

"You've got to tell the truth, as bad as it may be," Rose added.

Both Detroit 300 members said they applaud the response of Craig, who visited the scene Monday, even though a Detroit police officer wasn't involved in the shooting, and talked directly with the family.

Deputy Chief Rene Hall, along with the district's three community police officers, attended Tuesday's rally.

"I think if you look around, most of the people here are peaceful," Hall said. "You have a few agitators here and there, but for the most part people just want to be heard ... and we respect that.

" ... Chief Craig has done a phenomenal job ... to ensure that our relationship with the community is one that is genuine and its every day, not just in a critical situation."

















Detroiters Protest Man’s Fatal Shooting By ICE Agent: ‘We’re Not Gonna Burn Down Anything…We’re Not Savages’
April 28, 2015 7:28 PM
CBS News - Detroit
http://detroit.cbslocal.com/2015/04/28/detroiters-protest-mans-fatal-shooting-by-ice-agent-were-not-gonna-burn-down-anything-were-not-savages/


DETROIT (WWJ) – A loud crowd of protesters gathered  in a west side Detroit neighborhood Tuesday evening, outside a home where a federal agent shot and killed an alleged fugitive the day before.

The 200-strong group caused a traffic jam early Tuesday evening, at the corner of Chicago Road and Evergreen.

Among them were members of several community organizations, calling for justice, as well as peace, following the death of 20-year-old Terrence Kellom — a black man — as he was arrested by a Fugitive Apprehension Task Force.

“I think we are in the perfect position to let the country know…we’re not gonna burn down anything, we’re not gonna act ignorant, we’re not savages,” said Pastor Maurice Hardwick with the Live in Peace Movement.

“We’re gonna stand in unity as men and women, and we’re gonna demand results,” he said.
Authorities said Kellom, a habitual offender, had fled while on probation and was wanted as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza delivery man.

Police said Kellom wielded a weapon, reportedly a hammer, as he threatened the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer who opened fire — but family members who were inside the home dispute that claim.

“He had officers in front of him, he had officers in the back of him,” Kellom’s father, Kevin Kellom, told WWJ’s Stephanie Davis. “At what point did he grab a hammer? And, if that’s the case, they’re that close to him… Why not grab him?”

“Every time you come in contact with a young black man, (does) it have to result in death?”

Kevin Kellom said he watched as his son was shot twice in the chest before “eight more shots rang out.”

“They executed my son in my face. My son died with a clenched fist, no hammer. My son reached for me and got shot,” he said. “I want justice, I’m gonna get justice. I promised him that, and I’m promising his mother that. I’m not gonna stop until I get justice for my son.”

There were several Detroit police officers at the scene of Tuesday’s demonstration, ushering protesters as they marched down the street.

Many carried signs that read: “Black Lives Matter.”

When up to a dozen protesters lay down in the intersection, blocking traffic, one cop took to the bullhorn with a warning.

“You are in violation of the law. Stay on the sidewalk, stay on the sidewalk, and you will not be placed in custody,” the officer said.

Minutes later, a Detroit police bus arrived and the crowd began to move off the street. Dozens of protesters remained at the scene after 7 p.m., although traffic was moving again at Chicago and Evergreen.

There were no arrests.

A Detroit police investigation of Terrence Kellom’s death continues.
















Detroit protests call for charges against officer after fatal shooting
By Erika Erickson
Fox News - Detroit
Apr 28, 2015 7:09 PM CDT
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/story/28923081/detroit-protests-call-for-charges-against-officer-after-fatal-shooting




Fox 2 News Headlines

DETROIT - Tensions are high on Detroit's west side at Evergreen and West Chicago one day after the shooting death of Terrence Kellom.

Calling this situation murder with the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, Ron Scott joined protesters to support Kellom's family. The 20-year-old killed by a fugitive task force agent who had gone to the house to serve a warrant Monday.

"We're not anti-police, we are pro-human," said Scott. "And this was an inhumane situation that occurred."

"The police officer yelled freeze," said Kevin Kellom, Terrence's father. "He said 'Freeze, I will kill you, I will blow your m.f. brains out. Show me your hands, show me your hands.'"

Police were executing a search warrant for Kellom, wanted for armed robbery, and say he was not cooperating with police.  Sources say Kellom was hiding in the attic and came through the closet, arguing, and making commands to the agent. Then he allegedly came toward him with a hammer.

Kellom's father says that's a lie.

"My son reached out to me ," Kellom said. "And he reached out with open hands. When he died, he died with clenched fists."

Both Kellom and the federal agent who fired the shots were black. 

While the Wayne county medical examiners office says Terrence Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds -- Kevin Kellum says he watched his son get shot 10 times. 

"They are not police officers to me," Kellom said. "The are hired hitmen."

Detroit Police Chief James Craig told FOX 2  there was no forced entry to Kellom's home and the agent used deadly force because he felt threatened with his hammer. 

Craig says he's also committed to doing a timely and thorough investigation. Those protesting Tuesday say they simply want the truth.

"I want to make sure that we stay in peace and get a resolution and respect the family's wishes," said Pastor Maurice Hardwick. "And sit down with the officials and get the proper answers."

"We want justice," Scott said. "I don't care what we have to do, how long we have to take. We will get it."

"They killed my son in cold blood," Kellom said. "And for that, I will never forget. Never forget."

Demonstrators want body cameras on police officer and want the other police officers at the scene of the shooting charged as well.
















Conflicting accounts emerge on ICE agent fatal shooting of 20-year-old Detroit resident
Posted By Ryan Felton 
Tue, Apr 28, 2015 at 6:31 pm
Detroit Metro Times

The father of a 20-year-old Detroit man who was killed by a federal agent Monday said his son was unarmed when he was fatally shot inside their home on Detroit's west side. 

"There was no need to come in the way they did," said Kevin Kellom, 51, of the incident involving an Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer and his son, Terrance Kellom, who was shot dead when a multi-agency federal task force executed a search warrant on his home in the 9500 block of Evergreen. 

The Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team task force, which executed the warrant Monday, includes members of the U.S. Marshals Service, Detroit Police Department, Wayne County Sheriff's Office, ICE, and the Oakland County Sheriff's Office. 

Officers entered the home in broad daylight to arrest Kellom, an armed robbery suspect with a felony firearms warrant and a parole absconder, said Shanelle Williams, spokesperson for the Detroit Police Department. According to the Michigan Department of Corrections file on Kellom, he fled last August from probation he received for a 2013 concealed weapons offense. 

Kevin Kellom offered his side of the story to reporters on Tuesday. His account directly conflicts with statements from the Detroit Police Department, which on Tuesday said his son brandished a hammer and approached the ICE agent before he was killed.

"My son died with clenched fists," the father said during a press conference at the corner of W. Chicago and Evergreen on Tuesday, and he didn't have a hammer. To the sounds of car horns blaring on a jam-packed street, a group of 150-200 gathered outside Kellom's home Tuesday afternoon to call attention to the incident. 

What's more, Kevin Kellom said the shooting happened around 1:40 p.m. Monday, however the search warrant left at his home was signed at 4:35 p.m.

"They made that search warrant after they assassinated my son," Kellom asserted. 

The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office, says the warrant for Terrance Kellom's arrest for armed robbery was signed on April 2. Kellom allegedly robbed a pizza delivery man on March 31 using a rifle, the prosecutor's office said Tuesday. 

"We had evidence beyond a reasonable doubt to charge Kellom," said spokeswoman Maria Miller. "After the warrant was signed by a judge the police were authorized to arrest him and take him before a magistrate to be arraigned." 

But, she added, the incident that lead police to his father's house and the circumstances leading to the officers entering the home is currently under investigation.

A Detroit police spokesperson couldn't say how many agents were at the scene of the incident Monday; law enforcement officials at the press conference Tuesday estimated six-to-eight officers executed the search warrant, with more arriving after the shooting occurred. 

According to DPD spokeswoman Williams, Terrance Kellom was "armed with a hammer" and advanced toward the ICE agent before he was shot. The agent, a seven-year veteran of the agency, was backing away as he shot Kellom — as many as 10 times, neighbors and family members said — dead. Kellom was pronounced dead at a hospital shortly after the incident. 

ICE has not released the name of the officer involved in the incident. A spokesman said Tuesday he has "no history of adverse personnel actions." 

"Consistent with the agency's Use of Force Policy, the officer has been placed on administrative leave," said ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls, in a statement. "The officer is a lifelong Detroiter and former decorated 12-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department." 

An autopsy showed Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds, the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office said Tuesday. Spokesman Ryan Bridges said the examiner's office ruled Kellom's death a homicide, but declined to say how many gunshots entered his body, or where, citing policy.

The incident took place on the same day protesters clashed with police in Baltimore — while others marched peacefully — in response to the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old unarmed black male who died in police custody for reasons that amount to a mystery. 

Ron Scott, spokesperson for the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, described the death of Kellom as despicable.

"In light of national incidents, we find this latest shooting appalling, distressing, and despicable that another young Black man has to be killed in his house in front of his family with multiple gunshots," said Scott, in a statement Tuesday. 

Meanwhile, U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade said her office was monitoring the investigation into the incident.

“Yesterday's shooting was a tragedy and we offer our deep condolences to the family," said McQuade, in a statement Tuesday. "Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances. In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer. Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."

Following the press conference Tuesday, a large group of demonstrators marched down W. Chicago. 

Two decades ago, a cousin of Kellom, Roderick Carrington, was shot dead by a Detroit police officer under questionable circumstances, Scott said Tuesday.

"This family has had tragedy in two decades," he said.
















Detroit protests call for charges against officer after fatal shooting
Fox News - Detroit
Apr 28, 2015 4:33 PM CDT



Fox 2 News Headlines














Dad recounts son's dying words during fatal ICE shooting
By Gus Burns
April 28, 2015 at 3:45 PM
Updated April 28, 2015 at 7:36 PM
http://www.mlive.com/news/detroit/index.ssf/2015/04/dad_recounts_sons_dying_words.html#incart_story_package


DETROIT, MI -- Kevin Kellom of Detroit was at the Wayne County morgue Tuesday afternoon taking care of formalities. The body of 20-year-old Terrance Kellom, his son, was inside.
Police are saying little about what led to Terrance Kellom being shot multiple times inside Kevin Kellom's home on Evergreen in west Detroit shortly after noon Monday.

The father says he saw blood spatter on the wall of the entrance hall when an agent shot his son twice in the chest.

"Two shots rung out, he stumbled back and started walking toward me, calling my name, 'Daddy, Daddy,'" Kevin Kellom said. "Pop, pop, pop, pop, pop, pop. At least eight more shots ring out.

"When I turn to my son again, my son is on the ground ... he said, 'Daddy, daddy,' and took his last breath."

The Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office Tuesday morning performed an autopsy and determined Terrance Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds caused by homicide, spokesman Ryan Bridges says.

Bridges, citing policy, declined to say how many gunshots Terrance Kellom suffered or where they stuck him.

Detroit Police Chief James Craig says an Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent, acting as part of a U.S. Marshals Service-sponsored fugitive task force attempting to arrest Terrance Kellom, "felt threatened" and opened fire.

The chief, according to the Detroit Police Department Media Relations Department, "heard" Kellom was "armed with a hammer," which Craig also told George Hunter of the Detroit News.

Investigators were spotted removing a hammer concealed in a brown paper bag from the scene.

"No he didn't," Kevin Kellom said Tuesday. "My son had no hammer. That's a lie and I'll put that on my mom and dad's graves -- and they're dead."

Craig said Terrance Kellom, who absconded from probation in August related to an Oct. 2013 concealed firearm felony conviction, was wanted in connection with the armed robbery of a pizza delivery driver.

Maria Miller, a spokeswoman for Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy's Office, confirmed the outstanding warrant Tuesday.

"On April 2 ... he was charged ... on a not-in-custody warrant request with armed robbery, felon in possession of a firearm and felony firearm," Miller said in an email to MLive Detroit. "On March 31 ... at approximately 11:15 p.m. it is alleged that Terrance Kellom of Detroit robbed a 39-year-old man who delivered a pizza to a location on Englewood (in Detroit).
"Kellom was alleged to be armed with a rifle at the time he stole pizzas and money ... "

Craig told the Detroit News Kevin Kellom "was also wanted for a nonviolent felony ... a fraud case," but police "decided not to arrest him because of the circumstances," adding: "We can always pick him up later; we decided to let him properly grieve for his son."

Kevin Kellom told MLive Detroit police pulled him over about two weeks ago and never mentioned an outstanding warrant. The Wayne County Prosecutor's Office on Tuesday couldn't confirm any warrants had been issued Kevin Kellom's arrest.

ICE is conducting an internal investigation and on Tuesday identified the shooter as a lifelong Detroit resident and 7-year-veteran of the agency. He formerly worked as a Detroit police officer for 12 years.

The agent "has no history of adverse personnel actions" and has been placed on paid administrative leave pending the investigation, ICE spokesman Khaalid H. Walls said in a prepared statement.

Walls said ICE agents participate in a "broad range" of state, federal and local task forces.

Kellom, recollecting what led to the shooting, said he, his fiance, Terrance Kellom, his son's girlfriend, his daughter and his daughter's fiance were in the house when Kevin Kellom saw a black truck pull into the driveway.

The father says, at the time on the second floor, he came downstairs and saw three or four faces in the window.

"He said, 'Open the door,' I said, 'for what,'" Kevin Kellom said. "I said, 'Why are you here' ... and he said, 'Open the door mother (expletive) or we're going to knock it down.'"

Police asked Kevin Kellom who was inside. He admits to lying. He never mentioned his son.

At that point at least two police went upstairs, where they remained for between five and 10 minutes.

At one point, Kevin Kellom says he hears an officer yell, "Freeze, show me your hands."

"Immediately they're bringing (my son) downstairs to the hallway and I hear the officer saying, 'show me your hands, show me your hands,'" the father said. "They're tying to usher me to the dining room. They don't want me to see what's going on."

Kevin Kellom says he heard his son verbally berating the officers. Kevin Kellom told his son from across the living room to cooperate, he says.

"He had his hands in his pockets," said Kevin Kellom. "He pulled his hands out of his pockets, he stretched his hands out with his palms open toward me as he said, 'But, Dad.'

"I hear pop, pop. I hear two gunshots."

Kellom said he "went crazy" and struggled as an officer was able to get a handcuff on one of his wrists.

"You shot my son," Kevin Kellom says he yelled. "He didn't do nothing."

Kellom said seconds later, as he continued to struggle, he heard another string of gunshots and looked into his son's face and and watched him take his last breaths.

"He didn't put on the handcuffs until he was shot dead," the father said.

Investigators questioned all of the occupants at the scene, except Terrance Kellom's girlfriend, whom Kevin Kellom said refused to speak to them.

Kevin Kellom said police didn't presents him with a search warrant until about 7 p.m. Monday, and the time on the warrant said 4:39 p.m.

Ron Scott, the founder of the Detroit Police Coalition Against Police Brutality, says he plans to hold a press conference with Terrance Kellom's father and other relatives near the shooting scene at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday.
















Feds to monitor probe of fatal shooting by ICE agent
3:09 PM, Apr 28, 2015
5:49 PM, Apr 28, 2015
http://www.wxyz.com/news/feds-to-monitor-probe-of-fatal-shooting-by-ice-agent

DETROIT (AP) - U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade says her office will closely monitor the investigation into the fatal shooting of a Detroit man by a federal agent who was part of a fugitive apprehension team seeking him on a warrant.

McQuade said Tuesday that "police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances."

An autopsy shows 20-year-old Terrance Kellom died of multiple gunshot wounds following Monday's confrontation with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent in a west side home.

ICE says Kellom was wanted on armed robbery and weapons charges. State Corrections records list him as a probation absconder.

ICE and Detroit police are separately investigating Kellom's slaying. Neither agency commented Tuesday on the case.
















Father: 'They assassinated my son right in my face'
Apr 28, 2015 11:19 AM CDT
Fox News - Detroit



DETROIT (WJBK) - A 20-year-old man was fatally shot by a fugitive task force officer in Detroit Monday.

Officers say they had a warrant for Terrance Kellom for weapons and armed robbery. Kevin Kellom, Terrance's father, says officers from the fugitive task force brought his son from upstairs to downstairs. The young man had his hands in his pockets and wasn't fully cooperating with police. 

Detroit Police Chief James Craig says Terrance had a weapon. Agents of the fugitive task force say that weapon was a hammer. 

"His hands went from open to clutched; he was shaking," says Kevin. "The last two words my son said was, 'Daddy, daddy.' After the first two shots rung out, right after that, as I was rushed towards them in the dining room - bop, bop, bop, bop, bop, bop, bop. At least - at least! - at least, eight more shots rung out. And I know that for a fact. My son was shot ten times."

Kevin asks the question - why was deadly force necessary when he was surrounded by officers? 

"Why not use Tazers? ... Why not shoot him in his legs? If he had a hammer, there was no hammer," Kevin says. "No hammer. There was no weapons in my house. Period. I don't have weapons in my home."

Now Kevin, a grandfather, wonders what to tell Terrance's own children. 

"My grandson called me last night, 'Granddaddy, where's TT? Why TT?' How can that question get answered? They assassinated my son right in my face."

Later Tuesday, a protest is planned for 4 p.m. at the corner of Evergreen Road and West Chicago, in the neighborhood where the shooting took place. Terrance's family say they plan to be there. 
















Craig: Shot Detroit suspect was 'armed with hammer'
Candice Williams and George Hunter
The Detroit News 
10:51 a.m. EDT April 28, 2015

In the Detroit incident, the suspect was black, as was the federal agent who shot him.

Craig told WJR-AM (760) on Tuesday that said the suspect brandished a hammer. There was no evidence a gun was involved, he said. The agent fired his weapon as he was retreating, Craig said.

The suspect was taken to a local hospital and pronounced dead.

"Any time an ICE officer or special agent discharges their firearm in the line of duty, the ICE Office of Professional Responsibility reviews the matter," agency spokesman Khaalid Walls said in a written statement. "Due to this ongoing review, no further details will be released at this time."

Craig said he was called to the scene by Assistant Police Chief Steve Dolunt after a crowd gathered and became agitated.

Television cameras captured officers holding back people as they tried to maneuver past yellow crime scene tape.

"They were very excited," Craig told The Detroit News.

Craig met with family members of the man who was killed. Television cameras rolled as he explained to them and dozens crowded around him: "It's tragic. Any time a parent loses their child, it's a tragedy. I'm committed that the investigation will be thorough, and I will have a conversation with the prosecutor's office."

Teria Kellom said her brother Terrance Kellom was fatally shot. He was staying at his father's house when officers arrived, saying they had a search warrant, she said.

Her father first told police his son wasn't there, Kellom said. She said she asked to see the search warrant and officers told her they would show her father the warrant after family members left the home. Officers then went inside to search for her brother, Kellom said.

"The last thing I heard was: 'Come out or I'll shoot.' " Kellom said. "They shot him 10 times. They shot him and then they put the handcuffs on him."

Craig said the suspect was wanted for armed robbery of a pizza deliveryman, felony firearm and as an habitual offender.

According to the Michigan Department of Corrections, Kellom absconded from probation in August for a carrying concealed weapons conviction in 2013. According to his MDOC file, Kellom was 5-foot-10 and 145 pounds.

"His father, who was at the scene, was also wanted for a nonviolent felony ... a fraud case," Craig said. "We decided not to arrest him because of the circumstances. We can always pick him up later; we decided to let him properly grieve for his son."

Several police cars and caution tape blocked off Evergreen at West Chicago on the otherwise busy street with vinyl-sided bungalows.

One man in the crowd yelled: "The (ICE agent) shot that guy for no reason."

Craig told him: "We're going to interview all the witnesses. I can't say what happened."

Craig said the federal agent involved in the shooting is African-American.

After the incident, Craig told The News members of the crowd had expressed concerns about controversial officer-related shootings nationally.

"They had some issues about police-involved shootings in other parts of the country," Craig said. "Just by talking to them, they calmed down."

Ron Scott of the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality took issue with the shooting Monday, saying fugitive apprehension is not a license to kill.

"In light of national incidents, we find this latest shooting appalling, distressing and despicable that another young black man has to be killed in his house in front of his family with multiple gunshots," Scott said in a statement. "The coalition is working with the family ... We demand, and we will obtain, justice in this case."

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Office of Inspector General will investigate the incident, while Detroit Police conduct a criminal investigation, Craig said.

Detroit Police Commissioner Ricardo Moore, who represents District 7 where the shooting occurred, offered his condolences and said he will ask for details about the task force.

"My heart goes out to the ... family and the community on this situation," Moore said in a statement. "I would like to see the facts presented forthright, beginning with the task force Memorandum of Understanding."

Craig said he expects to hold a meeting with community residents within 48 hours.

















Protesters After ICE Shooting: 'We're Not Going to Burn Down Our City'
As the nation remains on edge after Baltimore riots, Detroit residents gather at site of fatal shooting of 20-year-old suspect.
By BETH DALBEY (Patch Staff)
April 28, 2015
Dearborn Patch
http://patch.com/michigan/dearborn/police-ice-agent-fired-multiple-times-fatal-shooting-fugitive-allegedly-armed-hammer

This story has been updated:

Demonstrators questioning the death of a 20-year-old Detroit man who was shot multiple times by a federal agent serving an arrest warrant vowed Tuesday to peacefully protest while still demanding answers.

Terrance Kellom, was shot by an officer with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), working on a fugitive apprehension task force. Police said he was armed with a hammer.

Several dozen protesters gathered outside the house where Terrance Kellom was killed Monday. The demonstration was a sharp contrast to rioting in Baltimore, MD, over the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody.

“We haven’t had one bottle thrown,” said Bobbie Davis, a spokesman for the Franklin Park Neighborhood Association, according to a report in The Detroit News.”We’re standing behind (the Detroit Police Department). We have some good police officers here. We’re not going to burn down our city; we’re going to build up our city. We’re going to show we’re not savages.

“But we’re going to demand answers,” Davis said. “Let things be handled by the Justice Department.”

Kellom’s father, Kevin Kellom, vehemently denied his son had a hammer.

“They assassinated my son, right in front of me,” he said at the rally. “That was an execution, right in my face.”

Patch’s earlier report:

A suspect armed with a hammer and killed in Detroit Monday by a federal agent sustained multiple gunshot wounds, according to autopsy results released Tuesday by the Wayne County Medical Examiner’s Office.

Terrance Kellom, 20, was shot by an officer with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), working on a fugitive apprehension task force. Kellom was on probation for a 2013 weapons offense and fled in August, the Detroit Free Press said.

The Free Press reported Tuesday afternoon Kellom was hiding in the attic when agents arrived at the house. Earlier in the day, a woman making a domestic violence complaint tipped off police to the fugitive’s whereabouts. There was no forced entry, and members of the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team were allowed into the home on Evergreen Road shortly after 1 p.m. Monday.

He was wanted on a four-count warrant as a suspect in the armed robbery of a pizza driver, a source told the Free Press.

Detroit Police Chief James Craig, whose department is investigating the shooting, said the agent used deadly force because he “felt that he was in imminent danger because the suspect was advancing on him in possession of this hammer.”

Kellom was “ assassinated right in front of my face,” his father, Kevin Kellom, told WJBK.

“His hands went from open to clutched; he was shaking,” Kevin Kellom told the TV station. “The last two words my son said was, ‘Daddy, Daddy.’ After the first two shots rung out, right after that, as I was rushing towards them in the dining room - bop, bop, bop, bop, bop, bop, bop. At least – at least – eight more shots rung out. And I know that for a fact. My son was shot 10 times.”

Kevin Kellom questioned why deadly force was used. “Why not use Tasers?” he asked, according to WJBK. “Why not shoot him in his legs?”

Not only did his son not have a hammer, “there was no weapons in my house, period,” he told the TV station. “I don’t have weapons in my home.”

U.S. Attorney’s Office Monitoring Investigation

An internal review of the shooting is under way by the ICE Office of Professional Responsibility. That’s standard procedure, ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls said, according to a WJBK-TV report.

The agent has been placed on administrative leave. The Detroit native, who hasn’t been named or charged, is a seven-year veteran of the agency. Before beginning his federal service, he was a decorated 12-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department, Walls said.

In a statement, U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade extended her condolences to Kellom’s family and called the shooting “a tragedy.” She said her office is monitoring the investigation.

“Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances,” she said. “In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer. Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation.”

A rally was planned Tuesday afternoon at Evergreen and Chicago, near where Kellom was shot and killed. Rally organizers say they want more information about what happened before the fatal shooting.

The shooting occurred on the same day that riots broke out in Baltimore, MD, over the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody, adding to mounting tensions between police and citizens nationwide.

“In light of national incidents, we find this latest shooting appalling, distressing, and despicable that another young black man has to be killed in his house in front of his family with multiple gunshots,” said Ron Scott, a spokesperson of the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality, according to a Free Press report.

A community meeting will be held at 4 p.m. Wednesday at Grace Community Church of Detroit, 20021 W. Chicago.
















Federal agent fatally shoots fugitive in Detroit
By Tresa Baldas and By Elisha Anderson
Detroit Free Press 
9:03 p.m. EDT April 27, 2015






An attempt to capture a fugitive turned deadly today on Detroit's west side, where a federal agent fatally shot a man who was wanted for a number of crimes, police said.

The incident happened at around 1 p.m. on the 9500 block of Evergreen near West Chicago.

According to Detroit Police Sgt. Cassandra Lewis, a fugitive task force had gone to a home to arrest a 20-year-old man when one of the task force members — an officer with the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) — "was faced with a threat" and opened fire.

"There was no forced entry," Lewis said. "One of the ICE officers was faced with a threat and made the decision to use lethal force to eliminate the threat."

Lewis did not elaborate, noting she did not have details as to what transpired before the wanted fugitive was shot. She said the DPD will investigate the shooting to determine if the force was justified.

"We don't know all of those details right now," Lewis said.

She said she did not know how many times the man was shot, if he had a weapon or what the threat was. The man's name has not been released by authorities.

According to Lewis, the victim had several outstanding arrest warrants for crimes including armed robbery and weapons violations.

Yellow police tape blocked off the area this afternoon and about 60 people—both relatives and community members—were gathered outside the home, some chanting at times.

"You're supposed to protect and serve the people," one woman yelled. "Not take them out."

Marked and unmarked law enforcement vehicles were parked on the street as officials investigated.

Lee Snipes, 43, of Detroit, said his cousin was the man killed.

Snipes said he arrived on the scene as his cousin was being brought out of the house on a stretcher and said there was "blood everywhere."

ICE officials confirmed that it was one of their officers who fired the fatal shot. The officer is part of the Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team.

"Any time an ICE officer or special agent discharges their firearm in the line of duty, the ICE Office of Professional Responsibility reviews the matter," ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls said in a statement. "Due to this ongoing review, no further details will be released at this time."

Maurice L. Hardwick, founder of the Live In Peace Movement, said he was called to the scene to help keep the peace.

He said some people are upset and questioning whether the shooting was justifiable or criminal.

"The facts have not been found," he said.

Today's shooting comes as law enforcement struggles to overcome an image problem exacerbated by recent police brutality incidents nationwide, including the highly publicized "I can't breathe" incident in which a New York man died after a police officer put him in a choke hold last August.

Detroit police commissioner Ricardo Moore said today's incident triggered more fear and anxiety in a community already struggling with poverty, crime and joblessness.

"When I first heard about this, my initial reaction was, 'Here we go again. But this time it's in my own backyard,' " said Moore, noting he isn't passing any judgment on law enforcement until he gets more information about the incident.

"My heart goes out to the ... family and the community on this situation," Moore said. "I would like to see the facts presented forthright."

Today's shooting comes one week after a former Inkster police officer was charged with assault and mistreating a prisoner for allegedly punching a motorist in an incident that was caught on video.

In announcing the charges, Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy said: "The job of a peace officer can be dangerous. But we cannot tolerate those who abuse their authority, violate their oath and prey on citizens rather than protecting them. We cannot turn our heads when the law enforcer becomes the law breaker."

In a separate case, however, Worthy said no criminal charges will be authorized against two officers who were videotaped by a citizen punching and kicking a carjacking suspect as they arrested him. Police said the suspect had allegedly carjacked a grandmother and her two children before police chased him down. Worthy said the suspect resisted arrest.
















ICE Officer ‘Faced With A Threat’ Fatally Shoots 20-Year-Old Man In Detroit
April 27, 2015 5:53 PM
CBS News - Detroit

DETROIT (WWJ) – An Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officer shot and killed a 20-year-old man Monday afternoon on Detroit’s northwest side.

Police say the agent — part of a fugitive task force involving ICE and officers with the Detroit Police Department — was attempting to serve an armed robbery warrant at a home in the 9500 block of Evergreen near W. Chicago when the shooting occurred.

“I am told there was no forced entry into the residence, that they were allowed inside,” said Detroit Police Chief James Craig. “And I’m also told that the agent may have been faced with a threat, and it was at that point when he decided to use deadly force.”

Craig would not talk more specifically about that alleged threat.

The suspect — a black man — had a prior criminal record including weapons charges, according to police.

WWJ’s Russ McNamara reported Craig was “trying to calm” neighbors at the scene expressing anger and frustration as they demanded answers.

One woman shouted at the chief as she described what she claims happened.

“It was 10 bullets…and did it take 10 bullets? When he came out, they didn’t have the handcuffs on him!” she said. “They shot him! He was not able to run to do nothin’. Y’all didn’t give him a chance!”

Craig promised a thorough investigation.

“We’re gonna interview all the witnesses. I can’t say what happened inside that home,” Craig said. “Let us do our job. We’ll do it as quick as we can. I don’t want this to be a two, three-month (investigation).”

“And at the appropriate time we’ll turn our investigation over to the Wayne County Prosecutor’s office who will make a decision on whether a crime was committed…That is not my decision,” he added.

There were other people inside the home at the time of the shooting, but no one else was hurt — including members of the task force.

ICE spokesman Khaalid Walls released the following statement Monday evening: “During a multi-agency enforcement action today at a Detroit residence, an ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officer fatally wounded a fugitive wanted on state armed robbery and weapons charges.

“Any time an ICE officer or special agent discharges their firearm in the line of duty, the ICE Office of Professional Responsibility reviews the matter. Due to this ongoing review, no further details will be released at this time.”

No names have been officially released, although the Detroit Coalition Against Police Brutality put out statement identifying the victim of the shooting as Terrence Kellom.

“In light of national incidents, we find this latest shooting appalling, distressing, and despicable that another young black man has to be killed in his house in front of his family with multiple gunshots,” said coalition spokesperson Ron Scott. “The coalition is working with the family, and they will release a statement soon regarding this matter. We demand, and we will obtain, justice in this case.”

With emotions running high in the neighborhood, Chief Craig said he would plan a community outreach meeting at a nearby church.
















Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer shoots, kills suspect on Detroit's west side
2:32 PM, Apr 27, 2015
12:40 PM, Apr 28, 2015
ABC News - Detroit
http://www.wxyz.com/news/region/detroit/immigrations-and-customs-enforcement-officer-shoots-kills-suspect-on-detroits-west-side











DETROIT (WXYZ) - An Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer shot and killed a suspect while serving a warrant, according to police.

It happened in the 9500 block of Evergreen near Joy on Detroit's west side.

We're told the ICE officer was serving the warrant to 19-year-old Terrence Kellum as part of task force investigation. Police say he was allegedly wanted for armed robbery.

The task force was known as "D-FAT" which stands for Detroit Fugitive Apprehension Team. It includes members of Detroit Police and U.S. Marshals.

Craig also said the officers were allowed inside, and one agent may have been threatened, and that's when he opened fire.

"I am committed that the Detroit Police Department will do a very thorough and very timely investigation," Craig said. He also said he is committed to having a conversation with the Wayne County Prosecutor who will make the final decision on what will happen next.

U.S. Attorney Barbara L. McQuade issued the following statement on Tuesday: “Yesterday's shooting was a tragedy and we offer our deep condolences to the family.  Police work sometimes requires use of deadly force, but officers may use only as much force as is reasonable under the circumstances. In a situation like this, it is important to protect the rights of both the deceased and the officer.  Therefore, we are closely monitoring the investigation."

On Tuesday, there were peaceful protests near West Chicago and Evergreen. 





















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BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS
Minutes of the Regular Board of Police Commissioners Meeting
Thursday, February 28, 2008
COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE

The forum of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners was held on Thursday,
February 28, 2008, at 3:00 p.m., at Police Headquarters, 1300 Beaubien, Detroit,
Michigan 48226.
Minutes of the Regular BPC Forum Thursday, February 28, 2008 Page 34.


BOPC OFFICER’S REPORT
1. CHAIRPERSON
2. SECRETARY REPORT

SUSPENSION WITHOUT PAY OF POLICE OFFICER MITCHELL QUINN,
BADGE 3005, ASSIGNED TO HOMICIDE

On February 19, 2008, the Internal Affairs Alert Team was directed to respond to the Northwestern District regarding an allegation of Felonious Assault/Domestic Violence committed by Police Officer Mitchell Quinn, badge 3005, assigned to Homicide.

On this same date, Officer Quinn’s wife, Police Officer Nicholle Quinn, badge 561, assigned to the Western District made a Crisnet report at the Northwestern District, alleging that her husband pointed his department issued weapon at her head during a verbal argument about several emails.

When Officer Nicholle Quinn attempted to make a 911 call on her cellular phone, Officer Mitchell Quinn grabbed her phone and broke it. Later, Officer Mitchell Quinn then threw his gun against the wall.

On the following day, Officer Mitchell Quinn’s son told the Wayne County Prosecutor’s office that he observed his father point a gun at this mother and push her down.

The Honorable Magistrate Sidney Barthwell Jr., of the 36th District Court, signed felony warrant #08-56835, which recommended one (1) count of Felonious Assault and one (1) count of Felony Firearm.

On February 20, 2008, Officer Mitchell Quinn was suspended from the Detroit Police Department.

Later on this date, Officer Mitchell Quinn was arraigned via video before Magistrate Charles Anderson III, of the 36th District Court. He was released on a $5,000.00 personal bond with a no contact provision.

The preliminary examination is scheduled for March 4, 2008.

Minutes of the Regular BPC Forum Thursday, February 28, 2008 Page 6

Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Officer Mitchell Quinn be charged with, but not limited to, the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:

CHARGE: CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER, CONTRARY TO THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CODE OF ETHICS; THIS BEING IN VIOLATION OF THE 2003 DETROIT POLICE DEPARTMENT MANUAL SERIES 100, DIRECTIVE 102.3 – 7.9, CONDUCT UNPROFESSIONAL, COMMAND 1.

Due to the seriousness of the conduct, I am requesting your concurrence with the suspension of Police Officer Mitchell Quinn without pay, effective February 28, 2008.

Unless contravened by this Board the suspension without pay shall stand.

There were no contraventions.

Exec Dir. Goss stated that Officer Quinn has requested a closed door session
for March, 6 2008.

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