Tuesday, December 31, 2019

Michigan OIDV Cases - Archives and Search tool












Search blog by case: 





Blog archive:





Michigan Officer Involved Domestic Violence...








Sunday, December 29, 2019

12292019 - The Consequences Of Reporting Officer Involved Domestic Violence






THE CONSEQUENCES OF REPORTING OFFICER INVOLVED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE [OIDV]
I am tired of being judged by people for the financial/unemployment situation I am in. No one who is judging me has ever walked in my shoes - and I hope to hell no one has to walk in my shoes.

My ex-boyfriend, Deputy Orval Parker of the Monroe County MI Sheriff Department held me at gun-point/attempted to kill me. Let me put this in perspective: Parker attempted to splatter my guts all over the kitchen and leave my young daughter without a mommy. The Monroe County Sheriff refused to have Parker arrested and the Monroe County Prosecutor refused to file criminal charges against one of their deputies.

The Michigan State Police informed me that Parker refused to take a polygraph. Because I know the laws, I knew the MSP could not request that I/the victim take a polygraph. So, when I was informed of this, I told the MSP that I would take the polygraph that Parker refused. With my polygraph, the Monroe County Sheriff still refused to suspend Parker from duty, let alone arrest Parker. Let me put this in perspective: The Sheriff had allowed Deputy Parker - whom he had solid evidence had attempted to kill me [my polygraph results] - continue to be on duty with the same gun he had tried to kill me with strapped to his hip.

The MSP didn't give up and finally the case was referred to the Washtenaw County Prosecutor's office. Felony criminal charges were filed against Deputy Parker, he was arrested and then suspended from duty. I was the first victim of officer involved domestic violence [OIDV] to pursue criminal charges in Monroe County - and among the first OIDV cases in the State.

But I wasn't a hero. Officials in Monroe County, and later the State, hated me for not only having survived Parker's attempt on my life, but for being a voice for OIDV and fighting for justice. OIDV is unique in that when you report a crime of abuse, you are not just standing up against your abuser, but officials. The officials in Monroe County and the State stopped at nothing to destroy me. Retaliation and black-balling of an OIDV victim is a reality - because officials are fighting to not only protect the officer who is facing criminal charges, but also any liability they may have had in ignoring the abuse [Failure To Protect / Color Of Law].

In Deputy Parker's case, there was a long history of the sheriff department being aware of his abuse to me and others, and instead of taking proper action, they had covered it up. My criminal OIDV case against Parker exposed all of the previous covering up of Parker's abuse by the SD and county officials. Let me put it in perspective: Monroe County officials wanted to shut me down in order to prevent the evidence/truth coming out.

And destroy me they did. All my work on drafting domestic violence programs for the Monroe City PD and the Prosecutor's Office; My research work on police department domestic violence calls; and my work directly with victims of domestic violence victims? I was erased. I never existed, although the county and city retain all my work. I was black-balled from ever again working in law enforcement; criminal justice; and with domestic violence victims.

Additionally, my reputation was trashed by officials in the county and later State officials. In their scenario, I had retaliated against poor Deputy Parker and the sheriff department by filing false criminal charges. I was a liar. I was crazy. I could never be trusted. These same officials never let on that they knew I had passed a polygraph and that they were aware of other incidents of Parker's abuse. Unfortunately, when an official spreads a horrible lie, the source is never questioned.

This attack of an OIDV victim in retaliation by powerful officials is something that is not experienced by any other crime victim. It was my reality - and it is something that you never recover from and nothing that I can ever correct. EVER. It is what it is. No one who has walked in my shoes or beside me will ever comprehend this diabolical destruction of my very person, just because I fought for justice.

Despite all of this hatred and destruction of me, I refused to back down in pursuing criminal charges against Deputy Parker. I did this not out of spite, but because I knew Parker had victimized others. I was the voice for Parker's other victims and his OIDV needed to be stopped - and the only way for that to happen was for him to be held accountable and sitting in prison.

I never once backed down from Parker's criminal charges - even when the prosecutor's office "lost" the paperwork for Parker's case [ahem]; and when my own parents decided to testify on the behalf of Parker and not their own daughter.

Trial was hell as Parker's defense attorney and deputies trashed me. Needless to say, the jury found Parker not guilty. The Monroe Evening News ran a front page article stating that Parker was "found innocent", and I was unjustly slammed for not being honest. Parker was placed back on duty with the Monroe County SD and received a big check for the time he had been suspended from duty following his arrest - compliments of the State and County. After all, he was viewed as the victim, not me.

I got on with my life, the best as I could. After all, there is no instruction manual for surviving OIDV and the malicious destructiveness of your soul. I turned my passion of working with domestic violence victims towards working with the OIDV community, where once again I became an expert in the field.

I created the Michigan Officer Involved Domestic Violence [MIOIDV] website - devoted to speaking out about victims of OIDV and following their cases. And although Michigan state agencies used my website as their own personal library, they refused to allow me to obtain state funding. After all, state officials would claim, look at what I had done to poor Deputy Parker and Monroe County, with my viciousness. In their eyes, it was wrong of me to cross the blue line.

Twenty years later, I finally returned home to Michigan. For the first time since Parker's trial, I was seeking employment. Yes, at my age, I should have been retired from the county with a full pension - but I lost everything the minute I fought for justice.

AND the people - who I once thought were friends - who judge me, can't understand what it is like for me to fill out job applications - where I can't put down my work history in law enforcement, criminal justice, and victimology. I can't mention the thousands of hours I volunteered to the city and the county governments in creating crime victim programs and my research in domestic violence. I can't even mention my college degrees - because like everything else, county officials made sure I never existed.

Twenty years later, and I am starting my life completely over. And yes, I am going to falter - and yes, I have incredible wonderful loving friends who pick me up and never let me give up. They know what I have been through - they get it.

But the ones who piss the hell out of me, are those people who know what I have been through, and feel it is their right to judge me. They let me know how much of a disappointment and failure I am - and they continue to beat me up and rejoice when I fall. And, I have allowed this judgement of me, by remaining silent at their attacks on me.

Here's to 2020 and me refusing to be silent any longer. If you want to judge me, I will loudly call you out to your face. After all, If you want to judge someone, take a look in the mirror. I am proud of who I have become. I am proud of my integrity, strength, and determination. And you know what, I just so happen to love who I am - and I happen to love the way my wonderful friends have put me back together, piece by piece.



Friday, November 8, 2019

11082019 - Former Mayor Gerald "Ajax" Ackerman To Be Paroled [03052020] - Port Huron


















'Perverted Pied Piper': Ex-Port Huron mayor convicted of molesting girls gets parole
Port Huron Times Herald
January 06, 2020
https://www.thetimesherald.com/story/news/2020/01/06/ex-port-huron-mayor-convicted-molesting-girls-gets-parole-gerald-ackerman/2824585001/


The former Port Huron mayor dubbed a 'perverted Pied Piper' by his sentencing judge is expected to be paroled March 5, according to the Michigan Department of Corrections.  

Gerald 'Ajax' Ackerman, 63, came before the Michigan Department of Corrections' Parole Board Nov. 4, according to the MDOC. 

A MDOC spokeswoman said Monday his 24-month parole term carries several conditions.

"He has a number of parole conditions such as registering as a sex offender; Attending treatment programming; Not having verbal, written, electronic or physical contact with any individual 17 or younger or attempt to do so through another person unless he has the written permission of his agent and an adult responsible for that individual is present; Must not reside, work or loiter within 1,000 feet of school property; Must not enter the city of Port Huron without written permission; Must comply with GPS tether monitoring; Must not use or possess alcoholic beverages or other intoxicants; and must consent to a search of his personal property at any time," Holly Kramer, MDOC spokeswoman said in an email.

Kramer said they are still completing the pre-parole investigation process, but Ackerman is expected to be supervised in St. Clair County.

"He received a misconduct for Insolence in 2002, possession of contraband in 2004 and being out of place in 2009," she said. 

Ackerman declined an interview with the Times Herald in November. 

Former St. Clair County Circuit Judge Peter Deegan sentenced Ackerman in June of 2000 to 18 to 38 years in prison for molesting three young girls in 1998 and 1999. He was sentenced to a year in jail for indecent exposure in an earlier trial that resulted in a hung jury on the sex act charges. 

Ackerman denied he molested the children during his sentencing, according to Times Herald reports from the time. 

A jury convicted him on charges of having sex and oral sex with 12- and 8-year-old girls, as well as photographing them in sexually explicit positions. Ackerman was also convicted of fondling an 11-year-old girl. 

Investigators at the time said the crimes happened at Ackerman's youth center, Clear Choices, which he founded in 1995 and was part of his platform when he served as mayor. 

"You truly acted out as a perverted Pied Piper," Deegan said during Ackerman's sentencing in June 2000. "You'll spend at least the next 18 years behind prison walls, and you're no longer a threat to young children."

Ackerman touted himself as a reformed motorcycle bad boy who worked with troubled kids and used the success of his youth center to land him in politics. 

He was elected as Port Huron's mayor in 1997 and was seen by many as a symbol of a changing community and the ability to forgive troubled pasts. He resigned from the position after being charged.  

Rise and fall of Ajax Ackerman - a timeline
* Summer 1995: Gerald 'Ajax' Ackerman, a recovering alcoholic and small-time trouble-maker in metro Detroit, works to stem youth gang violence in Port Huron. He earns a police award in 1994 for his work with children and opens Clear Choices, a center where he worked with troubled youth and offered a refuge for children, in 1995.

* November 1995: Ackerman, wearing a long beard and hair in a ponytail, runs for City Council and wins the seventh and final seat. But a recount shows a tie, and he loses a lottery to A. Herb Robbins. Ackerman is later appointed to council when James Relken resigns in 1997.

* November 1997: Ackerman is the top vote-getter for council and is elected as mayor. He is part of the city's push to comply with federal orders to eliminate sewer overflows. 

* April 1998: After learning the donated Clear Choices building must close, Ackerman searches for a new site. He attempts to secure federal funding through grants administered by the city. He withdraws the request when some residents question the activities of Clear Choices during a public hearing. An 18-year-old woman speaks on Ackerman's behalf, who testified a year later that she started a sexual relationship with him that month. The relationship ends in October, about the time she discovers she is pregnant. A year later, she testifies the child is his.

* February 1999: A mother complains to representatives of DARES, a local support center for sexual abuse victims, that she fears her teenage daughter is having an inappropriate relationship with Ackerman. The complaint is ignored.

* April 1999: Ackerman's third wife files for divorce on April 1, five days before he is arrested on charges of molesting young girls at Clear Choices. The charges are based on a one-day investigation stemming from a complaint by a woman who fears his relationship with her daughter.

* October 1999: Ackerman is found guilty on nine counts of indecent exposure and he immediately is sentenced to one year in jail. But the jury deadlocks on the major sex charges against him, forcing a new trial.

* May 2000: Times Herald photographers Tony Pitts and Mark Rummel are handcuffed and detained for about 20 minutes in Judge Peter Deegan's empty jury room before they were ordered to surrender their film and released after taking photos of jurors outside the courthouse following the second trial where Ackerman is found guilty on all charges.

* June 2000: Deegan sentences Ackerman to 18 to 38 years in prison for molesting three young girls in 1998 and 1999.

* Nov. 4, 2019: Ackerman attends a parole hearing. 

* Jan. 6, 2020: MDOC states Ackerman is expected to be paroled for 24-months starting March 5.



















Rise and fall of Gerald 'Ajax' Ackerman
Port Huron Times Herald
November 8, 2019

























'Perverted Pied Piper': Ex-Port Huron mayor convicted of molesting girls could be paroled
Port Huron Times Herald
Port Huron Times Herald
November 8, 2019
https://www.thetimesherald.com/story/news/2019/11/08/former-port-huron-mayor-convicted-molesting-kids-could-paroled/2527810001/


The former Port Huron mayor dubbed a 'perverted Pied Piper' by his sentencing judge may be paroled. 

Gerald 'Ajax' Ackerman came before the Michigan Department of Corrections' Parole Board Nov. 4, according to the MDOC. A decision on whether to parole the 63-year-old is expected in four to six weeks. 

Former St. Clair County Circuit Judge Peter Deegan sentenced Ackerman in June of 2000 to 18 to 38 years in prison for molesting three young girls in 1998 and 1999. He was sentenced to a year in jail for indecent exposure in an earlier trial that resulted in a hung jury on the sex act charges. 

Ackerman denied he molested the children during his sentencing, according to Times Herald reports from the time. 

A jury convicted him on charges of having sex and oral sex with 12- and 8-year-old girls, as well as photographing them in sexually explicit positions. Ackerman was also convicted of fondling an 11-year-old girl. 

According to the Michigan Offender Tracking Information System, Ackerman's earliest release date is March 5, 2020. 

Investigators at the time said the crimes happened at Ackerman's youth center, Clear Choices, which he founded in 1995 and was part of his platform when he served as mayor. 

"You truly acted out as a perverted Pied Piper," Deegan said during Ackerman's sentencing in June 2000. "You'll spend at least the next 18 years behind prison walls, and you're no longer a threat to young children."

Ackerman touted himself as a reformed motorcycle bad boy who worked with troubled kids and used the success of his youth center to land him in politics. 

He was elected as Port Huron's mayor in 1997 and was seen by many as a symbol of a changing community and the ability to forgive troubled pasts. He resigned from the position after being charged.  

Ackerman was not immediately available to be interviewed. 

"We were not notified regarding the parole hearing, but would strongly disagree that this child sexual predator should be paroled," Port Huron police Capt. Marcy Kuehn said in an email. 



A dark time 
"It was a dark time for our community," said St. Clair County Senior Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Mona Armstrong, who tried Ackerman's cases. 

She said Ackerman's parole hearing was not public and she has to have faith in the system on what is decided. 

"There's no amount of years that will ever make up for what happened, there’s no amount of time after which a victim and a victim's family feels, everything's fixed, everything's fine. There’s just no amount of time," she said. "Is 20 years enough? 25? Would 15 have been enough? I have to have faith in the process."

Armstrong said the crimes were horrific in many ways and impacted the entire community. 

"The violation of children is a horrific crime, in and of itself, added to that, was the fact he had quite honestly….he’s exploited an entire community. He passed himself off as something he was not, he used the trust he had fostered with community leaders and the public, the citizens of the community who had embraced him...and led everyone to believe he was trying to help children, and instead was exploiting them in the worst way possible."

Rise and fall of Ajax Ackerman - a timeline
* Summer 1995: Gerald 'Ajax' Ackerman, a recovering alcoholic and small-time trouble-maker in metro Detroit, works to stem youth gang violence in Port Huron. He earns a police award in 1994 for his work with children and opens Clear Choices, a center where he worked with troubled youth and offered a refuge for children, in 1995.

* November 1995: Ackerman, wearing a long beard and hair in a ponytail, runs for City Council and wins the seventh and final seat. But a recount shows a tie, and he loses a lottery to A. Herb Robbins. Ackerman is later appointed to council when James Relken resigns in 1997.

* November 1997: Ackerman is the top vote-getter for council and is elected as mayor. He is part of the city's push to comply with federal orders to eliminate sewer overflows. 

* April 1998: After learning the donated Clear Choices building must close, Ackerman searches for a new site. He attempts to secure federal funding through grants administered by the city. He withdraws the request when some residents question the activities of Clear Choices during a public hearing. An 18-year-old woman speaks on Ackerman's behalf, who testified a year later that she started a sexual relationship with him that month. The relationship ends in October, about the time she discovers she is pregnant. A year later, she testifies the child is his.

* February 1999: A mother complains to representatives of DARES, a local support center for sexual abuse victims, that she fears her teenage daughter is having an inappropriate relationship with Ackerman. The complaint is ignored.

* April 1999: Ackerman's third wife files for divorce on April 1, five days before he is arrested on charges of molesting young girls at Clear Choices. The charges are based on a one-day investigation stemming from a complaint by a woman who fears his relationship with her daughter.

* October 1999: Ackerman is found guilty on nine counts of indecent exposure and he immediately is sentenced to one year in jail. But the jury deadlocks on the major sex charges against him, forcing a new trial.

* May 2000: Times Herald photographers Tony Pitts and Mark Rummel are handcuffed and detained for about 20 minutes in Judge Peter Deegan's empty jury room before they were ordered to surrender their film and released after taking photos of jurors outside the courthouse following the second trial where Ackerman is found guilty on all charges.

* June 2000: Deegan sentences Ackerman to 18 to 38 years in prison for molesting three young girls in 1998 and 1999.

* Nov. 4, 2019: Ackerman attends a parole hearing. 

* Jan. 6, 2020: MDOC states Ackerman is expected to be paroled for 24-months starting March 5.

11082019 - MCL 769.4a Amended - Senate Bill 257 Enacted - ACT NO 115 - Criminal Proceedings Deferred & Probation Instead Of Jail - Effective 02062020




Defer criminal proceedings in domestic violence cases and place the  individual on probation. Upon fullfillment of conditions of probation, the court will dismiss the proceedings against the person.




OTHER CHANGES TO MCL 769.4A UNDER SENATE BILL 257 OF 2019/ACT NO. 115
Sec. 4a (4) Discharge and dismissal under this section shall  MUST be without adjudication of guilt and is not a conviction for purposes of this section or for purposes of disqualifications or disabilities imposed by law upon conviction of a crime...

Sec. 4a (7) if the record of proceedings as to the defendant is deferred under this section, the record of proceedings during the period of deferral shall  MUST be closed to public inspection.




















Tuesday, October 22, 2019

1022019 - MCL 769.4a Amended - Senate Bill 257 - Passed By House - Criminal Proceedings Deferred & Probation Instead Of Jail






Defer criminal proceedings in domestic violence cases and place the  individual on probation. Upon fullfillment of conditions of probation, the court will dismiss the proceedings against the person.



OTHER CHANGES TO MCL 769.4A UNDER SENATE BILL 257 OF 2019/ACT NO. 115
Sec. 4a (4) Discharge and dismissal under this section shall  MUST be without adjudication of guilt and is not a conviction for purposes of this section or for purposes of disqualifications or disabilities imposed by law upon conviction of a crime...

Sec. 4a (7) if the record of proceedings as to the defendant is deferred under this section, the record of proceedings during the period of deferral shall  MUST be closed to public inspection.









Monday, October 21, 2019

10212019 - Artis White's Book: Who Killed My Wife - Unsolved Murder Of Bernita White - BOOK PDF



Copies of the book that Michigan State Trooper Artis White [only person of interest in his estranged wife's murder] published shortly after Bernita Sims White's murder are no longer available. Therefore, MIOIDV is providing you with a copy of the book:



















Thursday, September 19, 2019

09192019 - MCL 769.4a Amended - Senate Bill 257 Passed By Senate - Criminal Proceedings Deferred & Probation Instead Of Jail



Defer criminal proceedings in domestic violence cases and place the  individual on probation. Upon fullfillment of conditions of probation, the court will dismiss the proceedings against the person.





OTHER CHANGES TO MCL 769.4A UNDER SENATE BILL 257 OF 2019/ACT NO. 115
Sec. 4a (4) Discharge and dismissal under this section shall  MUST be without adjudication of guilt and is not a conviction for purposes of this section or for purposes of disqualifications or disabilities imposed by law upon conviction of a crime...

Sec. 4a (7) if the record of proceedings as to the defendant is deferred under this section, the record of proceedings during the period of deferral shall  MUST be closed to public inspection.









Friday, May 10, 2019

05102019 - MCL 769.4a Amended - Senate Bill 257 Introduced - Criminal Proceedings Deferred & Probation Instead Of Jail



Defer criminal proceedings in domestic violence cases and place the  individual on probation. Upon fullfillment of conditions of probation, the court will dismiss the proceedings against the person.





OTHER CHANGES TO MCL 769.4A UNDER SENATE BILL 257 OF 2019/ACT NO. 115
Sec. 4a (4) Discharge and dismissal under this section shall  MUST be without adjudication of guilt and is not a conviction for purposes of this section or for purposes of disqualifications or disabilities imposed by law upon conviction of a crime...

Sec. 4a (7) if the record of proceedings as to the defendant is deferred under this section, the record of proceedings during the period of deferral shall  MUST be closed to public inspection.










Thursday, April 18, 2019

04182019 - Joni Holbrook - Murder of Trooper Melvin Paul Holbrook - Released from prison













JONI HOLBROOK SERVED 7+ YEARS FOR MURDERING HER HUSBAND. NOW SHE WANTS A SECOND CHANCE.
Nothern Express
JAN. 13, 2018
https://www.northernexpress.com/news/feature/what-now/
Joni Ankerson Holbrook is back home in northern Michigan after serving half of a 15-year maximum prison term for the murder her husband, Paul Holbrook, a state police sergeant.

The 56-year-old was sentenced to six to 15 years in prison for second-degree murder. She served 7 ½ years.

Holbrook received a lighter-than-normal sentence in 2009 because her attorney, Jesse Williams, persuaded a Benzie County judge that years of domestic abuse mitigated the killing. It didn’t excuse it, but she maintained that the violence she believed she couldn’t escape needed to be taken into account. (Paul Holbrook’s family maintained at her sentencing that the abuse never happened.)

Nonetheless, Holbrook was released in April to a Benzonia motel. She’s since moved to Traverse City to live with her mother.

Returning to the world has been a struggle. Holbrook, who spent a career in professional office jobs and worked in district court before she became a felon, now works manual labor in a factory. She would like to find work to help victims of domestic violence, but so far she’s found no opportunities.

Prison was horrible, she said, and she vows never to go back, but she’s found adjusting to life as a convicted murderer released from prison also poses incredible challenges. But she said the whole experience has made her a tougher person.

“I had a friend of mine not long ago tell me, ‘Oh, people don’t change,’” she said. “Well, I want that person to know, they do change. I’ve changed tremendously. I stick up for myself. I don’t apologize. You can ask me any question you want, I’ll tell you anything you want to know.”

The Northern Express sat down with Holbrook and talked about her experiences in prison and the challenges she’s faced since she got out. 

Northern Express: What do you want to say about your time in prison?

Joni Holbrook: Prison is like a subsidiary of hell. It’s awful. It’s horrid. Living with 2,300 women of all ages shapes, sizes, races, education, lack thereof, morals, manners, lack thereof. Very interesting. When I got to prison I weighed 101 pounds. I was so wrecked, so broken.

Express: I recall the mugshot of you that was in the media around the time of your trial, and I saw you MDOC mugshot from just prior to your release on parole. You looked much healthier, much better at the end of your stay in prison.

Holbrook: A lot healthier because, as my dad always said, you better bend over and pull up your bootstraps because you’re in for it. It was nothing I was ever prepared for. I mean, obviously, the point where I got to where I thought killing my husband was the only way for me to get out, that’s how damaged and broken domestic violence made me. And thinking that that was okay now shocks me, but it was the only way I knew then, how to get away. So, when you get to prison, you better decide real quick if you’re going to stick up for yourself, learn how to say no, or just be a victim all over again.

Express: And you learned how to stick up for yourself.

Holbrook: Yes. I certainly did. I’m nobody’s victim. I learned how to say no. I learned how to be a real bitch, actually. And I think at that point I was able to do that because of the decision I made to free myself by taking his life. Yeah. 

Express: Did prison do anything to help you prepare for coming out of prison?

Holbrook: Yeah. I mean one thing, there’s nothing like being in a room all alone. When I first got there I was in the Reception and Guidance Center, and I was in a room all by myself for 60 days or longer. And there’s nothing like being in a room alone with nothing but four walls and your thoughts. No noise. No officers screaming over the intercom. You have to ask to go to the bathroom. A lot of alone time. A lot of thinking time. I was able to dig really deep and just take things out and look at ’em and realize a lot about myself.

Express: After six years, you were up for parole, and the first time you went before the board you were denied. Why was that? 

Holbrook: I remember sitting in the interview with the parole man, and my sister was there with me, and we talked about the abuse, and my parole decision came back as denied, and I got flopped — that’s continued — for 18 months, based on the fact that the parole board thought that I blamed the victim and his family and showed little or no concern for them and that I would actually be at risk to reoffend, which shocked me. I mean I’ve never been in trouble in my life.

Express: What about the victim in your case? You’ve described yourself as a victim, and said you want to stand up and work on behalf of victims. Is that fair? How do you defend that to Paul Holbrook’s family today, who might say that since you took away their loved one, you don’t deserve that chance?

Holbrook: Well, he was a victim, obviously. He was victim of a horrific, terrible crime. Was I a victim of over 10 years of horrific abuse — mental, physical, sexual, emotional? Absolutely. I mean, and the caveat to that is the fact that he was a police officer. He held all the power, control, authority. And so I let him do all of that to me. I was weak enough to let him groom me and fall into the trap. Am I a victim? Absolutely. And I will never stop saying that. I’m not a victim any more. It will never happen again.

Express: So you were out in April. You found yourself in Benzie County in a motel. What was that first week like?

Holbrook: The first week, actually, I felt really free. I was in a room for the first time by myself. I had my own bathroom. I had my own space. I was able to see my family, my kids, which was awesome. Realizing that I was finally able to make my own decisions, I didn’t have to ask permission to do anything. I didn’t have to check in with anybody. … When I got home finally, that freedom and that realization that I was able to make my own choices was huge and very freeing.

Express: But then you found that once you were able to make your own choices, you didn’t have very many options.

Holbrook: Right. And I understand that. I am a convicted felon. I bet I’ve applied for 50 jobs, ’cause I have 28 years’ experience in the law. I worked at district court for close to 10 years, all through the ’90s. … In the other years, I worked for attorneys — clients, customer-service related, I like to work with people. But say you’re a prospective employer, and you get my resume and you think, ‘Oh, this doesn’t look bad, she might be a good fit for the office.’ So you call the first person that I’ve worked for in the past and their response to you is, ‘Oh, I didn’t even know she was out of prison yet.’ I mean, do you bring that out right away? Do you wait on that? The first thing people do, prospective employers right now, is check your record, and when they see that I’m a felon and then that I have a murder charge, most people don’t look further than that.

Express: So what are you doing right now?

Holbrook: I am working in a factory right now. I work different jobs there. I work 7 to 3:30, I’m working on the line some days. I’m working manual hard labor, clean up. I actually broke one of my ribs a couple weeks ago at work. And I can do that. I am really strong. I can do a job like that. But I’m only making $10 an hour. And I understand people’s reluctance, but I just wish people would talk to me. I wish someone would give me a chance. I believe I am a wealth of information, as far as the experience in the law, being a victim of domestic violence, being in prison … I want to work as an advocate. I want to be the voice for victims.

Express: You mentioned you’ve gone to the Women’s Resource Center, and you’ve tried to work as an advocate there.

Holbrook: Yeah, when I first got out of prison, I worked through my parole agent in Benzie County. I had an employment counselor. And he got me a job at the Women’s Resource Center thrift store, part time, 20 hours per week. I was actually working for them, but it was through the AARP foundation. I couldn’t live on that. … So I was working there, and I wanted so bad for the Women’s Resource Center to hire me, which they had the choice of doing but apparently didn’t have the capability money-wise. I felt a lot of that was political. I really felt like because of who my victim was. 

Express: But, do you have any training in social work?

Holbrook: No, I don’t. I have no training in social work, and it was made clear to me — I don’t have a degree, I don’t have a bachelor’s degree, a master’s degree. Which is true.

Express: Is that something that you’d like to do?

Holbrook: Yeah, it’s something I’d like to do. But I believe I have a master’s degree in domestic violence. I believe I probably know more about it than anybody who’s been schooled in it. I respect people that have degrees and learned whatever they’ve learned, but if you’ve never experienced it, you’ve never been through it, I would rather talk to someone like me rather than someone with a degree hanging on the wall, and that’s just how I feel about it. … I’m so strong. I know exactly what I went through. I know exactly what I did, why I did it. My feelings on that now are completely different. Because I’ve had all this time to reflect on it.

Express: How are your feelings different?

Holbrook: I just am shocked that I was ever in that place. Shocked that he was able to get me to where I thought killing him and taking his life was the only way out. But I know for a fact, and I’ve said this from the beginning: I took his life to save my own, because he was going to kill me, and he told me how he was going to kill me, and I believed him. 

This interview was edited and condensed for clarity.

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

03052019 - Deputy David Aldrich - Clare County Sheriff Department


Another case pled under MCL 769.4a [Michigan's Lautenburg Amendment loophole for police officers] in which the case and charges disappear?






Clare County Sheriff: Deputy on Administrative Leave for Domestic Abuse
9 and 10 News
March 05, 2019
https://www.9and10news.com/2019/03/05/clare-county-sheriff-deputy-on-administrative-leave-for-domestic-abuse/

The Clare County sheriff says a deputy is on administrative leave after he was arrested for domestic abuse.

Sheriff John Wilson says Deputy David Aldrich has been placed on administrative leave.

He says Aldrich was already arraigned on the charges.

Michigan State Police are now handling the investigation.

We are working to find out more details.

Stay with us for developments.













Clare County sheriff deputy on leave after domestic abuse charge
WNEM News
March 05, 2019
https://www.wnem.com/news/clare-county-sheriff-deputy-on-leave-after-domestic-abuse-charge/article_b6e1ee78-3fb7-11e9-92b3-9fc3025ab15f.html
Michigan State Police are investigating after a Clare County Sheriff Deputy was arrested and charged with domestic abuse.

Undersheriff Dwayne Miedzianowski confirmed that Deputy David Aldrich has been placed on unpaid administrative leave since his arrest.

Details on the arrest and arraignment are limited because the case is being handled in another county.

Clare County Prosecuting Attorney Michelle Ambrozaitis said she has handed the case off to Missaukee County due to a conflict of interest.

David DenHouten, Missaukee County Prosecutor declined comment on the case.

Aldrich is scheduled to be in court again on March 21st at 9 a.m.













MSP: Clare County Sheriff deputy arrested for domestic abuse, will face trial
Up North Live
March 06, 2019
https://upnorthlive.com/news/local/msp-clare-county-sheriff-deputy-arrested-for-domestic-abuse-will-face-trial

CLARE COUNTY, Mich. -- A Clare County Sheriff’s deputy has been placed on leave after being arrested for domestic abuse, acccording to a news release from the Michigan State Police.

The incident took place in June 2018, and the Michigan State Police began their investigation in December 2018.

Following the investigation, documentation was submitted to the Clare County Prosecutor’s Office who recused themselves from involvement.

The case was then turned over to the Missaukee County Prosecutor’s Office by the Michigan Attorney General’s Office.

After that, aggravated domestic assault charges were filed against the deputy.

The deputy was arrested on those charges and lodged at the Gladwin County Jail where he later posted bond.

He will be facing trial, which is set for the end of March.













Clare deputy arrested on domestic abuse charges
Morning Sun
March 06, 2019
https://www.themorningsun.com/news/clare-deputy-arrested-on-domestic-abuse-charges/article_fadba1a4-402b-11e9-9e9c-b350c79ce03a.html


A Clare County sheriff’s deputy involved in a domestic violence incident is going to trial at the end of the month.

In December, the Michigan State Police Mt. Pleasant Post investigated a domestic violence incident from June that involved a Clare County sheriff’s deputy, according to a press release sent out by MSP on Wednesday.

Clare County Sheriff John Wilson confirmed to 9&10 News that Deputy David Aldrich, 31, was placed on administrative leave on Tuesday. He also told the news outlet that Aldrich was already arraigned on assault charges.

Aldrich was arrested on a charge of aggravated domestic assault and held at the Gladwin County Jail, where he later posted bond.

The Clare County Prosecutor’s Office recused themselves from the case after receiving documents from the investigation. The case was handed over to the Missaukee County Prosecutor’s Office by the Michigan Attorney General’s Office.

The case is to go to a jury trial on March 21, according to court documents.













Clare County Sheriff’s Deputy Arrested for Domestic Violence
MI Headlines
March 06, 2019
https://www.miheadlines.com/2019/03/06/clare-county-sheriffs-deputy-arrested-for-domestic-violence/

CLARE COUNTY, MI – In December 2018 the Michigan State Police (MSP) Mount Pleasant Post investigated a domestic violence incident that occurred in June 2018 involving a Clare County Sheriff’s Deputy.Sheriff

Following the investigation, documentation was submitted to the Clare County Prosecutor’s Office who recused themselves from involvement. The case was then turned over to the Missaukee County Prosecutor’s Office by the Michigan Attorney General’s Office.

Subsequently, charges of aggravated domestic assault were filed against David Aldrich. Aldrich was arrested on those charges and lodged at the Gladwin County Jail where he later posted bond. The case is set for trial at the end of March 2019.














Clare deputy arrested on domestic abuse charges
Pontiac Oakland Press
March 06, 2019
https://infoweb.newsbank.com/
A Clare County sheriff's deputy involved in a domestic violence incident is going to trial at the end of the month.

In December, the Michigan State Police Mt. Pleasant Post investigated a domestic violence incident from June that involved a Clare County sheriff's deputy, according to a press release sent out by MSP on Wednesday.

Clare County Sheriff John Wilson confirmed to 9&10 News that Deputy David Aldrich, 31, was placed on administrative leave on Tuesday. He also told the news outlet that Aldrich was already arraigned on assault charges.

Aldrich was arrested on a charge of aggravated domestic assault and held at the Gladwin County Jail, where he later posted bond.

The Clare County Prosecutor's Office recused themselves from the case after receiving documents from the investigation. The case was handed over to the Missaukee County Prosecutor's Office by the Michigan Attorney General's Office.

The case is to go to a jury trial on March 21, according to court documents.












Deputy charged with domestic assault
Clare County Review
March 7, 2019
https://www.clarecountyreview.com/news/police-courts/deputy-charged-with-domestic-assault/

A Clare County Sheriff’s Office deputy, David J. Aldrich, 31 of Clare, has been placed on unpaid administrative leave after his recent arrest for a domestic assault incident last June, Sheriff John Wilson said Wednesday.

According to records at the Clare County Sheriff’s Office, Aldrich was placed on unpaid administrative leave January 10th.

Michigan State Police investigated the incident in December, according to their March 6th release.

Following the investigation, the results were submitted to Clare County Prosecutor Michelle Ambrozaitis, who “recused” the office from involvement.

The case was turned over to the Missaukee County Prosecutor’s Office by the Michigan Attorney General’s Office. They then filed charges of aggravated domestic assault against Aldrich. He was arrested January 10th on the charges and lodged at the Gladwin County Jail. He was later arraigned on the charge.

Aldrich has been released on bond.

The MSP release said that the case is set for trial at the end of March.




Sunday, February 10, 2019

02102019 - MSP Trooper Adam Mullin - Huron County Post - Aggravated DV; Felony Firearm; Bodily Harm Less Than Murder...






Police: Mid-Michigan trooper arrested and charged on 6 felonies
WNEM NEWS
February 15, 2019
https://www.wnem.com/news/police-mid-michigan-trooper-arrested-and-charged-on-felonies/article_692bda36-3166-11e9-9843-cfad1d0ea3cf.html

A Michigan State Police trooper from Mid-Michigan was arraigned in court following an arrest made earlier this week.

Adam Mullin, a trooper assigned to the MSP Caro Post, was arraigned in Huron County on Feb. 15.

Police said Mullin was arrested by MSP on Tuesday, Feb. 12 and lodged in the Lapeer County Jail. 

"It's unfortunate but Trooper Adam Mullin assigned to the Caro post was arrested," said Lt. Jim Lang with Michigan State Police.

Lt. Lang said own of their own was taken into custody after an investigation.

Mullin was placed on unpaid suspension, according to police.

Mullin was arraigned on the multiple charges including assault with intent to do great bodily harm less than murder, obstruction of justice, misconduct in office, assaulting/resisting/obstructing a police officer causing injury, aggravated domestic violence, and felony firearm.

Lt. Lang would not go into detail on how those charges came about but only said they involved another police officer.

Tpr. Mullin was showcased on TV5 when he graduated from the State Police Academy.

That was back in December of 2016 where he talked to TV5 about the big day.

"It was one of the best experiences of my life," Mullin said back in 2016.

About a year and a half later he was one of four officers regarded as heroes for saving a man from his burning home.

Now he sits in jail with his bond set at $250,000.

"It is disappointing but the allegations were made, an investigation was done, and the attorney general reviewed it and felt there was probable cause to support the charges and issued the warrant. We'll let it work its way through the court and see what happens next," Land said.

Lt. Lang said no one is above the law.

"We're held accountable like anybody else, it's not different for me because I wear this uniform, we are gonna make sure that our members act appropriately and conduct our business appropriately," Lang said.  

Regardless of whether a criminal charge results in a conviction, employees can still be subject to administrative penalties resulting from violations of department policy.

Mullin has been a member of the MSP since July 2016, according to police.












State police trooper accused of assaulting fellow officer
MLive
Feb 15, 2019


CARO, MI — A Michigan State Police trooper is being charged after allegedly assaulting another trooper assigned to his post, according to police.

The Michigan State Police announced the charges in a press release Friday afternoon.

Adam Mullin, of the MSP Caro Post, was arraigned in Huron County District Court on charges of aggravated domestic violence, assault with intent to do great bodily harm less than murder, obstruction of justice, misconduct in office, assault, resisting or obstructing a police officer causing injury and felony firearms on Friday, Feb. 15, according to the press release.

Lt. James Lang confirmed the victim in the incident was another trooper at the Caro Post.

Mullin, a member of MSP since 2016, was arrested and lodged in the Lapeer County Jail on Feb. 12.

He was put on unpaid suspension, according to the press release.












Michigan State Police trooper arraigned on charges he assaulted partner
Detroit Free Press
February 16, 2019
CARO, Mich. — A Michigan State Police trooper is facing charges after allegedly assaulting his female partner while on duty.

WJRT-TV reports 25-year-old Adam Mullin of the Caro post was arraigned Friday on charges of assault with intent to do great bodily harm, obstruction of justice, official misconduct, assaulting a police officer causing injury, aggravated domestic violence and committing a felony while carrying a firearm.

The assault occurred Sunday. The partner, whom WJRT didn't identify, is recovering from her injuries.

Kelly Rossman-McKinney, a spokeswoman for the Michigan attorney general's office, says it's a case of domestic violence. The office and Michigan State Police are investigating.

It's not clear whether Mullin has an attorney who might comment on his behalf. Mullin doesn't have a published home telephone number.












State trooper facing assault charges, report alleges he injured trooper he had affair with
MLive
Jun 21, 2019


BAD AXE, MI – When an affair between two Michigan State Police troopers began last year, it soon took a violent turn, police reports say. The female trooper was hospitalized for injuries and the male trooper now faces several criminal charges.

Adam S. Mullin, 25, on Friday, June 21, appeared for a preliminary examination that ended with him being bound over to Huron County Circuit Court for trial on five charges.

Mullin faces charges of assault with intent to do great bodily harm less than murder, aggravated domestic violence, obstruction of justice, misconduct in office, and assault, resisting or obstructing a police officer causing injury.

The Michigan Attorney General’s Office is prosecuting Mullin, who is free on bond with a GPS tether.

The two troopers worked together out of the Caro Michigan State Police Post, covering Huron, Tuscola, and Sanilac counties.

Details of Mullin’s case were revealed in police reports obtained by MLive from the Michigan State Police via a Freedom of Information Act request. Portions are redacted, such as the victim’s name.

The following information comes from those reports.

About 8 a.m. on Feb. 12, the female trooper’s mother brought her to the MSP Lapeer Post. She was unable to walk due to injuries and was carried into the post by a lieutenant and a sergeant, the report states.

Inside, the injured woman spoke with detectives. She told them she and Mullin, who is married to another woman, had begun a romantic relationship in February 2018.

While on duty, the pair would park a patrol car in a secluded area and engage in sex acts, the woman told police.

As the relationship progressed, Mullin grew increasingly jealous and prone to anger, the reports state.

“Adam would be engulfed in jealousy if he observed any men interested, contacting and/or talking to (her),” the reports state. “His anger and jealousy would turn into belittling, screaming, yelling and threats.”

Mullin eventually grew violent, the report says. While working in the same patrol vehicle one early summer morning, Mullin allegedly struck the woman in the chest with his right arm then pinned her against the passenger window, choking her so she could not breathe. Mullin, who was driving, eventually pulled over into a closed Reese gas station and the woman exited the vehicle, the report says.

Mullin again choked her while they worked together on Dec. 29, the woman told investigators. She sustained an injury to her eye socket in this incident, she said. She provided investigators with photos of her injuries.

The woman described a series of assaults in the following months, including three times when Mullin flipped her out of a chair.

The last instance of abuse happened Feb. 10 at an MSP detachment at 675 S. Van Dyke Road in Bad Axe. While sitting at separate desks, the woman received a notification on her phone, stirring apparent anger in Mullin. He began asking her about other men, eventually going “into a rant,” saying she had ruined his life, reports state.

Feeling things might get bad, the woman went to a restroom and locked the door behind her. Mullin started banging on the door, “hitting it so hard that paint chips were falling off the wall.”

He eventually stopped and the woman thought he left. After about 10 minutes, the woman exited the restroom and saw Mullin sitting at a computer, reports state.

A portion in the narrative here is redacted, but the subsequent section indicates Mullin threatened to kill the woman if she said something disparaging about his wife. He then pushed the now-seated woman and her chair rolled into a heater and then the wall. The woman stood up and told Mullin to stop, raising her right fist in a ready position to fend off an attack.

Mullin picked up the woman by her midsection and threw her, she said. She struck her head and back on the floor and “curled up in a ball and began crying. She immediately felt pain in her head and back. She couldn’t move her left leg,” the reports state.

Mullin approached her and apologized, saying he didn’t mean to push her that hard. He helped her up and suggested they stage a slip-and-fall during a traffic stop to conceal what had happened, according to the police report.

During her interview with detectives, the woman received text messages from Mullin’s phone where he admitted to the previous day’s assault, reports state.

By the next morning, the woman was treated at a hospital in Bad Axe before being transferred to McLaren Regional Medical Center in Lapeer. Mullin had taken her to the first hospital.

The day of the interview, the MSP 3rd District Fugitive Team arrested Mullin as he left his residence on a felonious assault charge and lodged him in the Lapeer County Jail. The agency also placed him on unpaid administrative leave.

As part of their investigation, detectives reviewed video footage recorded by the camera in Mullin’s patrol vehicle. The footage shows Mullin initiating a traffic stop on Feb. 10. He twice asks a woman, “You good?” before the woman replies, “Yeah.”

While speaking with the driver of the stopped vehicle, Mullin says, “I’m going to get you going on your way here. I’m going to go see what’s going on with my partner back there; I think she fell.”

Mullin then asks the woman what hurts, to which she says her leg and back. He asks her if she fell, but her response is inaudible.

Detectives also spoke with the woman’s mother, who said she too had been initially led to believe her daughter was injured by a slip-and-fall on ice. Her daughter later told her Mullin had assaulted her, the mother told detectives.

The evening of Feb. 12, detectives interviewed Mullin in jail. Read his Miranda rights, Mullin agreed to speak with them.

“I’m just gonna be straight forward and honest with you guys,” Mullin told them, according to their reports. “There’s no point in hiding it.”

Mullin said he and the female trooper were working on reports in the Bad Axe detachment when she began making derogatory comments about his wife. He grew angry and shoved her chair, which slid backward and struck a space heater. When the woman stood up with her fist raised, “I kinda reacted and pushed her,” Mullin told the detectives.

Mullin appeared to minimize his actions throughout the interview, detectives wrote. He stated he knew she had not intended to hit him with her fist.

“This statement leads investigators to believe Mullin took exception to (the woman) standing up for herself and assaulted her, rather than fearing an imminent battery,” detectives wrote. “Mullen would eventually concede he did use an exceptional amount of force, but told us, ‘I didn’t mean to.’ He added, ‘She’s not in the wrong here.’”

Asked who was in the wrong, Mullin said, “I am. I should not have touched her in the first place.”

Mullin also told detectives that shortly after the assault, he had contacted his supervisor and central dispatch to report the woman had been injured in a slip-and-fall. When he took her to the Bad Axe hospital, he did not tell staff how the woman’s injuries were truly incurred, reports state.

Mullin left the hospital about 8 a.m. on Feb. 11, only to later return with a Buffalo Wild Wings gift card and flowers for the woman. Detectives asked why he would do such a thing.

“Because I knew she’d like them,” he replied. “She’d think it was sweet.”

Mullin also agreed with the woman’s account that they had begun a sexual relationship in 2018, had engaged in sexual activity in patrol vehicles while on duty, and that he had assaulted her in the past, the police report states. He further agreed that after the Feb. 12 assault, he conducted a traffic stop as pretext for a scenario wherein the female trooper could pretend she injured herself from falling.

Mullin also said he had assaulted his wife. When detectives interviewed his wife, she denied this and said she had never known her husband to be violent, reports state.

Police obtained text message conversations between Mullin and the female trooper, exchanged after her hospital visit.

“You’ll be fine,” one message from Mullin’s phone reads. “Just gonna take some time to recover.”

“Yeah thank god,” the woman replies, “but this (expletive) sucks. You gotta find a way to control your anger.”

“Ok well I’ve apologized 1 million times and brought you flowers and bdubs and tried to show I care. So you already know I (expletive) feel terrible. You need to not be so (expletive) frail.”

Mullin is represented by Flint attorney Matthew L. Norwood. MLive was unable to reach Norwood for comment.












Judge revokes bond for state cop accused of assaulting coworker, threatening her
MLive
Jul 16, 2019


BAD AXE, MI – A Michigan State Police trooper accused of abusing a female coworker will be jailed for the immediate future.

Huron County Circuit Judge Gerald M. Prill on Monday, July 15, revoked the bond of 25-year-old Adam S. Mullin and ordered he be held in jail pending trial. Prill made the decision based on allegations that Mullin had intimidated the victim in his case, court staff confirmed.

Prior to Monday, Mullin had been free on bond with a GPS tether. In motion seeking his bond be revoked filed, the Michigan Attorney General’s Office – which is prosecuting the case – alleged Mullin on four dates violated the geographical restrictions of the GPS tether.

The motion also states that during a prior preliminary examination in Huron County District Court, Mullin mouthed “You’re dead” to his victim as she testified.

The motion states “that defendant’s threat to the victim is a clear bond violation and an example of his extreme dangerousness and disregard for the Court. Defendant’s bond conditions include the order to not harass, intimidate, or threaten the victim.”

Mullin’s trial is to begin Sept. 10.

Mullin is charged with assault with intent to do great bodily harm less than murder, aggravated domestic violence, obstruction of justice, misconduct in office, and assault, resisting or obstructing a police officer causing injury.

The Michigan Attorney General’s Office is prosecuting Mullin, who had been free on bond with a GPS tether.

Mullin and his fellow trooper worked together out of the Caro Michigan State Police Post, covering Huron, Tuscola, and Sanilac counties. Police reports obtained by MLive via a Freedom of Information Act request state the two had been engaging in a sexual relationship for a year, during which time Mullin would turn violent.

On Feb. 10, Mullin threatened to kill the woman and threw her several feet within an MSP Bad Axe detachment, the reports state. The woman was injured and Mullin suggested they stage a slip-and-fall during a traffic stop to conceal how she incurred her wounds, the reports state.

Two days later, the woman’s mother took her to an area hospital and she told police what had happened. Police then arrested Mullin.













Michigan State Police trooper found guilty in assault of female colleague
MLive
Oct 10, 2019


BAD AXE, MI — A jury has found a Michigan State Police trooper guilty of four criminal charges related to what investigators say was his assault of a female colleague while on duty.

Jurors on the evening of Thursday, Oct. 10, found Adam S. Mullin, 25, guilty of assault and battery, obstruction of justice, assaulting, resisting, or obstructing police causing injury, and aggravated domestic violence. During the trial, which began with jury selection on Tuesday, Huron County Circuit Judge Gerald M. Prill gave a directed not-guilty verdict for the fifth count Mullin faced, that of misconduct while in office.

The jury had begun their deliberations on Thursday afternoon.

The Michigan Attorney General’s Office prosecuted Mullin, with Assistant Attorney General Danielle Hagaman-Clark taking lead at trial.

Mullin and his fellow trooper worked together out of the Caro Michigan State Police Post, covering Huron, Tuscola, and Sanilac counties in Michigan’s Thumb region. Police reports obtained by MLive via a Freedom of Information Act request state the two had been engaging in a sexual relationship for a year, during which time Mullin would turn violent.

On Feb. 10, Mullin threatened to kill the woman and threw her several feet within an MSP Bad Axe detachment, the reports state. The woman was injured and Mullin suggested they stage a slip-and-fall during a traffic stop to conceal how she incurred her wounds, the reports state.

By the next morning, the woman was treated at a hospital in Bad Axe before being transferred to McLaren Regional Medical Center in Lapeer. Mullin had taken her to the first hospital.

The morning of Feb. 12, the female trooper’s mother brought her to the MSP Lapeer Post where she filed her complaint with detectives. She was unable to walk due to injuries and was carried into the post by a lieutenant and a sergeant, the report states.

Troopers arrested Mullin the same day.

Mullin has been a trooper since 2016 and has been on unpaid suspension since his arrest. He was married to another woman at the time of his relationship with the female trooper.

Mullin was initially free on bond with a GPS tether following his Feb. 15 arraignment. Judge Prill revoked his bond in July after finding Mullin had intimidated his victim during a preliminary examination. Mullin was accused of mouthing, “You’re dead” to her as she testified.

Mullin remains in custody. Prill is to sentence him on Dec. 2.













Michigan State Police trooper convicted of assaulting female partner
Detroit Free Press
October 12, 2019
CARO, Mich. —A Michigan State Police trooper has been found guilty of assaulting his female partner while on duty.

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel says a jury convicted 25-year-old Adam Mullin Thursday of obstruction of justice, obstructing a police officer causing injury, aggravated domestic violence and assault and battery.

Mullin who was assigned to the state police Caro post was charged in February.

State police director Col. Joseph Gasper says Mullin has been on unpaid suspension since his arrest. The department has moved to permanently revoke his law enforcement certification and terminate his employment.

Mullin will be sentenced Dec. 2.













Michigan State Police Trooper Convicted Of Assaulting Female Partner
WWJ NEWS
OCTOBER 12, 2019 


CARO (WWJ/AP) - A Michigan State Police trooper has been found guilty of assaulting his female partner while on duty.

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel says a jury convicted 25-year-old Adam Mullin Thursday of obstruction of justice, obstructing a police officer causing injury, aggravated domestic violence and assault and battery.

"Domestic violence is a serious matter and we are steadfast in holding those who commit these acts accountable – law enforcement and civilians alike," Attorney General Dana Nessel said in a statement. "It is serendipitous that this verdict comes during National Domestic Violence Awareness Month and it reminds us of the work that still remains to end this epidemic in our state and nation."

Police reports obtained by MLive show that Mullin, who was married at the time, and his road patrol partner were engaged in a sexual relationship for a year and that Mullin eventually turned violent. On the last instance of abuse, Mullin threatened to kill the woman and threw her several feet, then suggested they stage a slip-and-fall during a traffic stop to conceal her injuries, according to the report. The woman was so badly injured, she couldn't walk under her own power.

Mullin, who was assigned to the state police Caro post in Michigan's thumb region, was charged in February and has been on unpaid suspension since his arrest. Due to his conviction, the department has moved to permanently revoke his law enforcement certification and terminate his employment.

Mullin will be sentenced Dec. 2. The most serious charge, obstruction of justice, carries a maximum sentence of five years in prison.













Former state trooper sentenced for assaulting female trooper while on duty
MLive
Dec 02, 2019


BAD AXE, MI — A former Michigan State Police trooper has received jail time and probation for his on-duty assault of a female colleague.

Huron County Circuit Judge Gerald M. Prill on Monday, Dec. 2, sentenced 26-year-old Adam S. Mullin to three terms of one year in jail, plus a fourth term of 93 days in jail. All the terms are to run concurrently.

Prill gave Mullin credit for 149 days served, leaving 216 days left for him to serve.

Prill also sentenced Mullin to three years of probation, which starts Monday. The judge also ordered him to pay $426 in court costs and fines.

While on probation, Mullin is prohibited from having contact with his victim or her family and from possessing weapons. He is also to attend a 52-week anger management-style program and is to receive mental health counseling.

A jury in October found Mullin guilty of four counts — assault and battery, obstruction of justice, aggravated domestic violence, and assaulting, resisting, or obstructing police causing injury. During the trial, Prill gave a directed not-guilty verdict for the fifth count Mullin faced, that of misconduct while in office.

The Michigan Attorney General’s Office prosecuted Mullin, with Assistant Attorney General Danielle Hagaman-Clark taking lead at trial.

"Adam Mullin’s actions violated the very trust we put in our law enforcement officers,” Attorney Genearl Dana Nessel said. “We are grateful to the Michigan State Police and to Huron County Circuit Judge Prill for ensuring justice is served.”

Nessel also lauded Hagaman-Clark’s work on the case.

"Domestic violence is a choice batterers make to abuse their intimate partner,” said Hagaman-Clark. “That choice stems from their desire to control and manipulate their partners at the cost of all else. In this case, Mullin made a choice to put his desire to control his partner over his oath to serve and protect the community.”

Mullin and his fellow trooper worked together out of the Caro Michigan State Police Post, covering Huron, Tuscola, and Sanilac counties in Michigan’s Thumb region. Police reports obtained by MLive via a Freedom of Information Act request state the two had been engaging in a sexual relationship for a year, during which time Mullin would turn violent.

On Feb. 10, Mullin threatened to kill the woman and threw her several feet within an MSP Bad Axe detachment, the reports state. The woman was injured and Mullin suggested they stage a slip-and-fall during a traffic stop to conceal how she incurred her wounds, the reports state.

By the next morning, the woman was treated at a hospital in Bad Axe before being transferred to McLaren Regional Medical Center in Lapeer. Mullin had taken her to the first hospital.

The morning of Feb. 12, the female trooper’s mother brought her to the MSP Lapeer Post where she filed her complaint with detectives. She was unable to walk due to injuries and was carried into the post by a lieutenant and a sergeant, the report states.

Troopers arrested Mullin the same day.

Mullin became a trooper in 2016 and was placed on unpaid suspension upon his arrest. He was married to another woman at the time of his relationship with the female trooper.

Mullin was initially free on bond with a GPS tether following his Feb. 15 arraignment. Judge Prill revoked his bond in July after finding Mullin had intimidated his victim during a preliminary examination. Mullin was accused of mouthing, “You’re dead” to her as she testified.

The Michigan State Police fired Mullin upon his conviction. The agency also moved to have Mullin’s certification with the Michigan Commission of Law Enforcement Standards revoked.












Michigan trooper gets jail for assaulting female colleague
Detroit News
December 03, 2019


Caro – A Michigan State Police trooper has been sentenced to one year in jail for assaulting a female colleague while on duty.

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said Tuesday that 25-year-old Adam Mullin has already served 149 days of his sentence. He also was given three years of probation at his sentencing on Monday.

A jury in October convicted Mullin – who was assigned to the state police post in Caro – of obstruction of justice, obstructing a police officer causing injury, aggravated domestic violence and assault and battery.

The state has moved to permanently revoke his law enforcement certification and terminate his employment. He has been on unpaid suspension since his arrest.












MSP Trooper found guilty of assault against female coworker has been sentenced
WNEM
December 03, 2019


A state trooper from Mid-Michigan who was found guilty of domestic violence has been sentenced.

Adam Mullin, 25 from Millington, was found guilty on two felony and two misdemeanor charges related to an assault on a female colleague.

Attorney General Dana Nessel said a jury found Mullin guilty on charges of obstruction of justice, obstructing a police officer causing injury, aggravated domestic violence and assault and battery.

A fifth count of misconduct in office didn’t go to the jury because the judge granted a motion for a directed verdict, meaning there was insufficient evidence presented for the charge.

“Domestic violence is a serious matter and we are steadfast in holding those who commit these acts accountable – law enforcement and civilians alike,” Nessel said.

On Dec. 2, Mullin was sentenced to a maximum of 1 year behind bars, with credit for 149 days already served. He will also serve three years of probation.

Col. Joe Gasper, director of the Michigan State Police, said Mullin had been on an unpaid suspension since his arrest on February 12. After the conviction Mullin’s law enforcement certification was revoked and his employment terminated.












Michigan state trooper gets jail for assaulting female colleague
Detroit Free Press
December 03, 2019


CARO, Mich. — A Michigan State Police trooper has been sentenced to one year in jail for assaulting a female colleague while on duty.

Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said Tuesday that 26-year-old Adam Mullin has already served 149 days of his sentence. He also was given three years of probation at his sentencing Monday.

A jury in October convicted Mullin — who was assigned to the state police post in Caro — of obstruction of justice, obstructing a police officer causing injury, aggravated domestic violence and assault and battery.

The state has moved to permanently revoke his law enforcement certification and terminate his employment. He has been on unpaid suspension since his arrest.













Michigan Trooper Gets Year In Jail For Assaulting His Female Partner
WWJ NEWS
DECEMBER 03, 2019 - 1:46 PM


LANSING (WWJ) - A Michigan State Police trooper has been sentenced to a year in jail for assaulting his female partner while on duty.

Adam Mullin, who was convicted in Huron County Circuit Court of four assault-related charges back in October, will spend one year in Huron County Jail followed by three years of probation, according to Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel.

The 25-year-old has already served 149 days of his jail sentence and now has 216 days remaining. His probation starts immediately.

“Adam Mullin’s actions violated the very trust we put in our law enforcement officers,” said Nessel, in a statement.  “We are grateful to the Michigan State Police and to Huron County Circuit Judge Prill for ensuring justice is served.”

The charges against Mullin were the result of a Michigan State Police investigation.  

Police reports showed that Mullin, who was married at the time, and his road patrol partner were engaged in a sexual relationship for a year and that Mullin eventually turned violent. On the last instance of abuse, Mullin threatened to kill the woman and threw her several feet, then suggested they stage a slip-and-fall during a traffic stop to conceal her injuries, according to the report. The woman was so badly injured, she couldn't walk under her own power.

Following Mullin’s conviction, MSP moved to permanently revoke his law enforcement certification and terminate his employment.

“Domestic violence is a choice batterers make to abuse their intimate partner,” said Assistant Attorney General Danielle Hagaman-Clark, who prosecuted the case.  “That choice stems from their desire to control and manipulate their partners at the cost of all else.  In this case, Mullin made a choice to put his desire to control his partner over his oath to serve and protect the community.”

In 2018, Michigan State Police’s Incident Crime Report indicated that there were 48,264 domestic violence offenses reported to Michigan law enforcement.

If you are in danger, contact an organization in your area that can help, use a safer computer, call 911, or the U.S. National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 and TTY 1-800-787-3224. For more information and available resources on domestic violence, visit mi.gov/domesticviolence.