Wednesday, March 28, 2007

Officer Lathuya Weaver - Detroit PD




March 28, 2007: Officer Lathuya Weaver, Detroit Police Department

OFFENDER: LATHUYA WEAVER [FORMER DETROIT PD OFFICER]



SHOT AT HUSBAND:
http://michiganoidv.blogspot.com/2007/03/officer-lathuya-weaver-detroit-police.html

ORIGINAL CHARGES: FELONIOUS ASSAULT; DISCHARGE OF A WEAPON.











video
From: Cloudwriter / Behind The Blue Wall:







Detroit police officer Lathuya Weaver arrested.





During a domestic dispute with her husband, at their Romulus home, Officer Lathuya Weaver fired her gun. No one was injured.







Officer Weaver's husband.







Officer Lathuya Weaver was arrested and the assault, and arraigned the following day.







Officer Weaver was charged with one count of discharging a firearm in an occupied building; one count of felonious assault; and felony firearms. She was released on bond.









http://www.michigan.gov/documents/mcoles/3-Minutes_-_September_17_Mtg_252877_7.pdf






Complaints against police rise
Problems, criminal cases prompt questions about system designed to identify troubled officers

Ronald J. Hansen
The Detroit News
Thursday, May 17, 2007
http://www.detnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070517/METRO/705170396

DETROIT -- In a recent one-week span, the Detroit Police Department saw one of its detectives plead guilty to defrauding crime victims, a sergeant charged with 16 sex-related felonies and a patrol officer charged with attempted murder in a road rage incident.

It was an especially bad week for a department that has been battered this year with at least seven criminal cases and a rising number of citizen complaints.

As of April 19 , the department had received 467 new citizen complaints compared to the 381 filed at the same time a year earlier.

But the problems, which run from the familiar complaints of excessive force up to murder, also raise questions about the effectiveness of the city's computerized early-warning system intended to identify troubled officers. The department belatedly brought a risk-management system online two years ago, according to James Tate, a spokesman for the police.

Even so, the federal court-appointed monitor considers it inadequate, and, four years after the city agreed to implement such a system, the monitor still gives the department mostly failing grades in that area.

Tate said the criminal troubles were largely unforeseeable.

"These are off-duty incidents that could have happened in anybody's lives," he said.

The department is taking too long to implement the risk management system and leadership could be a reason, said Samuel Walker, a criminal justice professor at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a national expert on police accountability.

"It all depends on the commitment," Walker said. "I knew Detroit had some very serious problems. I'm troubled that it's taking this long.

"Based on the experience of other departments, I'm not surprised. It's going to take some leadership."

Last month, Sheryl Robinson Wood, the court-appointed federal monitor, noted the department was not complying with nine of the 17 mandates regarding a risk-management database. The areas where the department was in compliance mostly related to developing plans for the system.

Key areas, such as having an operational database, a trial system or even picking a contractor for it, remained unfinished, the monitor reported in April.

Meanwhile, troubling incidents -- the kind such systems are designed to reduce -- continue for the department despite its efforts.

The complaints often give rise to lawsuits, which drain city resources and helped spur federal oversight of the department in the first place.

Risk-management systems are common in large police departments and typically analyze a dozen or more indicators with an eye toward flagging potential problems. For police, it often means examining citizen complaints, lawsuits, arrest data and attendance for each officer.

The programs, however, require leaders to make them a priority, said Walker, who has researched early-warning systems in departments nationwide.

"These systems are now generally regarded as the best tool for ensuring accountability," Walker said. "In every department, you've got a few employees who are at the far end. You can identify them and apply the appropriate remedy."

In Detroit, the Roosevelt Tidwell case is among the most disturbing criminal allegations to surface.

In April, Sgt. Tidwell, 39, was charged with first-degree criminal sexual conduct after a pair of couples reported he threatened them with jail if they didn't perform sex acts while he watched.

Another couple filed a similar complaint in February, but Tidwell continued patrolling by himself until the latest complaint led to his prosecution.

Tate said the initial complaint sparked an investigation of Tidwell that was ongoing when the second case happened.

"Officers are going to receive citizen complaints. I don't care whether you're the best officer or the worst officer. That's going to happen. If there's a pattern, then you have an issue," Tate said.

There are usually warning signs of trouble for officers, Walker said.

A closer look at Lance Newman, for example, might have suggested he had money problems.
Newman filed for bankruptcy twice in the 1990s and owed the state back taxes, according to a lien filed against him last year.

About that time, Newman was investigating the stabbing death of an activist and began bilking the man's family out of $12,300. He is awaiting sentencing in federal court for wire fraud.

Tate, however, said the department's system doesn't examine records such as bankruptcy.






Detroit police officer charged for assaulting husband
Articles by Molly Tippen
Staff Writer
April 05, 2007
The Journal Newspapers Online
http://www.journalgroup.com/Romulus/3793/detroit-police-officer-charged-for-assaulting-husband

An off-duty police officer landed in hot water last week when she allegedly fired one round from her department-issued weapon at her husband.

Detroit Police Ofc. Lathuya Weaver was charged in a three-count indictment March 30 at the 34th District Court in Romulus.

She is charged with one count of discharging a firearm in an occupied building, a four-year felony, one count of felonious assault, a four-year felony, and felony firearms, a two-year felony.

Weaver, a 10-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department, was arraigned via video and quietly said “yes” when Judge David M. Parrott asked if she understood the nature of the charges against her.

Parrott ordered Weaver released on $15,000 personal bond after her husband agreed to allow her to return home and said there would be no firearms in the house. Romulus police detectives confiscated her service weapon after she was arrested.

Police received a call from the panic-stricken husband at about 1 a.m. on March 28, said Det. Joshua Monte of the Romulus Police Department. The husband reported that the pair had been arguing at their home on the 8300 block of Camden Street, and that she had fired shots at him.

“They were involved in a verbal altercation, and it unfortunately escalated to the point where she shot at him,” he said. “We first received a call from the husband, then we received a call from (Lathuya Weaver), who said she was assaulted.”

No one was struck by a bullet or hurt during the incident, Monte said. After an investigation, Weaver was arrested without incident.

There wasn’t enough evidence at the scene to indicate that Weaver’s husband assaulted her, and warrant requests seeking charges against the husband were denied by the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office, Monte said.

Second Deputy Chief James Tate, a spokesman for the Detroit Police, said Weaver is suspended with pay pending the outcome of the case.

“We will do an independent investigation into the incident,” he said. “That is done every time an officer’s weapon is discharged.”

If convicted of any of the felony charges, Weaver will automatically lose her job, Tate said. If convicted of any lesser charges, she could be subject to inter-department discipline that could include anything from a suspension all the way to termination, he added.

If convicted of all of the charges, Weaver could face up to 10 years behind bars.

Weaver will return to the 34th District Court for a pre-trial examination at 9 a.m. on April 11.














DETROIT BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS
Minutes of the Regular Board of Police Commissioners Meeting
Thursday, April 5, 2007
The regular meeting of the Detroit Board of Police Commissioners was held onThursday, April 5, 2007, at 3:00 p.m., at the Police Headquarters, 1300 Beaubien, Rm.328-A, Detroit, Michigan 48226.

EXCERPT FROM PAGES 3 and 4:
BOPC OFFICER’S REPORT SUSPENSION SUSPENSION WITHOUT PAY OF POLICE OFFICER LATHUYA WEAVER, BADGE 5055, ASSIGNED TO THE WESTERN DISTRICT INVESTIGATIVE OPERATIONSOn March 28, 2007, Force Investigation was notified of an allegation of misconduct concerning Police Officer Lathuya Weaver, badge 5055, assigned to the Western District Investigative Operations.

The allegation concerned the following conduct:
On March 28, 2007, Officer Weaver, and her husband, Darin Weaver, were engaged in a verbal altercation at their residence at 8400 Camden, Romulus, MI., regarding Mr. Weaver’s bathroom hygiene habit of leaving excessive water around the sink. The verbal argument escalated to removing each others clothes from the closet and throwing the clothes on the floor. At this time, they began wrestling over a telephone.

Mr. Weaver took the telephone and sat down at the foot of the bed to read mail and sales advertisements. While Mr. Weaver was reading, Officer Weaver took her department issued weapon from a backpack that was lying on the floor next to the bed and fired one (1) shot over Mr. Weaver’s left shoulder. The bullet went through the west wall of the bedroom and exited the west side of the house.

At approximately 1:00 A.M., on this same date, police officers from the Romulus Police Department responded to the residence regarding a domestic dispute.

At that time, Officer Weaver was arrested for Felonious Assault/Domestic Violence.

On March 29, 2007, the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office issued a three (3) count felony warrant charging Officer Weaver with Felonious Assault (MCL 750.82); Discharge of a Firearm in a Building (MCL 750.234); and Felony Firearm (MCL 750.227b).

In addition, Officer Weaver was arraigned at 34th District Court. A not guilty plea was entered on her behalf and Officer Weaver was released on a $10,000.00 personal bond, with the conditions that she does not engage in any further domestic disputes and that she does not carry a firearm.

A preliminary examination is scheduled for April 11, 2007.

Based on the above circumstances, it is recommended that Officer Weaver be charged with, but not limited to, the following violation of the Detroit Police Department Rules and Regulations:CHARGE:CONDUCT UNBECOMING AN OFFICER, CONTRARY TO THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CODE OF ETHICS; THIS BEING IN VIOLATION OF THE 2003 DETROIT POLICE DEPARTMENT MANUAL SERIES 100, DIRECTIVE 102.3 – 7.9, CONDUCT UNPROFESSIONAL, COMMAND

1.Due to the seriousness of the conduct, I am requesting your concurrence with the suspension of Officer Weaver without pay, effective April 5, 2007. Unless contravened by this Board the suspension without pay will stand. There were no contraventions.









Officer suspended after off-duty weapon discharge
Molly Tippen
The Journal Newspapers Online
UPDATE March 30, 2007
http://www.journalgroup.com/Romulus/3773/officer-suspended-after-off-duty-weapon-discharge

An off-duty police officer landed in hot water last week when she allegedly fired one round from her department-issued weapon at her husband.

Ofc. Lathuya Weaver, whom is employed by the Detroit Police Department, was charged in a three-count indictment March 30 at the 34th District Court in Romulus.

She is charged with one count of discharging a firearm in an occupied building, a 4-year felony, one count of felonious assault, a 4-year felony, and felony firearms, a 2-year felony.

Weaver, a 10-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department, was arraigned via video and quietly said “yes” when Judge David M. Parrott asked if she understood the nature of the charges against her.

Parrott ordered Weaver released on $15,000 personal bond after her husband said it was okay for her to return home, and said there would be no firearms in the house. Romulus police detectives confiscated her service weapon after she was arrested.

Police received a call from the panic-stricken husband at about 1 a.m. on March 28, said Det. Joshua Monte of the Romulus Police Department. The husband reported that the pair had been arguing at their home on the 8300 block of Camden Street, and that she had fired shots at him.

“They were involved in a verbal altercation, and it unfortunately escalated to the point where she shot at him,” he said. “We first received a call from the husband, then we received a call from (Lathuya Weaver), who said she was assaulted.”

No one was struck by a bullet or hurt during the incident, Monte said. After an investigation, Weaver was arrested without incident.

There wasn’t enough evidence at the scene to indicate that Weaver’s husband assaulted her, and warrant requests seeking charges against the husband were denied by the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office, Monte said.

Second Deputy Chief James Tate, a spokesman for the Detroit Police, said Weaver is suspended with pay pending the outcome of the case.

“We will do an independent investigation into the incident,” he said. “That is done every time an officer’s weapon is discharged.”

If convicted of any of the felony charges, Weaver will automatically lose her job, Tate said. If convicted of any lesser charges, she could be subject to inter-department discipline that could include anything from a suspension all the way to termination, he added.

If convicted of all of the charges, Weaver could face up to 10 years behind bars.

Weaver will return to the 34th District Court for a pre-trial examination at 9 a.m. on April 11.











Officer suspended after off-duty weapon discharge
Journal Newspapers, MI
Mar 30, 2007
Molly Tippen
http://www.journalgroup.com/Romulus/3773/officer-suspended-after-off-duty-weapon-discharge

An off-duty police officer landed in hot water last week when she allegedly fired one round from her department-issued weapon at her husband.Ofc. Lathuya Weaver, whom is employed by the Detroit Police Department, was charged in a three-count indictment March 30 at the 34th District Court in Romulus.

She is charged with one count of discharging a firearm in an occupied building, a 4-year felony, one count of felonious assault, a 4-year felony, and felony firearms, a 2-year felony.

Weaver, a 10-year veteran of the Detroit Police Department, was arraigned via video and quietly said "yes" when Judge David M. Parrott asked if she understood the nature of the charges against her.

Parrott ordered Weaver released on $15,000 personal bond after her husband said it was okay for her to return home, and said there would be no firearms in the house. Romulus police detectives confiscated her service weapon after she was arrested.

Police received a call from the panic-stricken husband at about 1 a.m. on March 28, said Det. Joshua Monte of the Romulus Police Department. The husband reported that the pair had been arguing at their home on the 8300 block of Camden Street, and that she had fired shots at him.

They were involved in a verbal altercation, and it unfortunately escalated to the point where she shot at him, he said. We first received a call from the husband, then we received a call from (Lathuya Weaver), who said she was assaulted.

No one was struck by a bullet or hurt during the incident, Monte said. After an investigation, Weaver was arrested without incident.There wasn’t enough evidence at the scene to indicate that Weaver’s husband assaulted her, and warrant requests seeking charges against the husband were denied by the Wayne County Prosecutor’s Office, Monte said.

Second Deputy Chief James Tate, a spokesman for the Detroit Police, said Weaver is suspended with pay pending the outcome of the case.

"We will do an independent investigation into the incident," he said. That is done every time an officer’s weapon is discharged.

If convicted of any of the felony charges, Weaver will automatically lose her job, Tate said. If convicted of any lesser charges, she could be subject to inter-department discipline that could include anything from a suspension all the way to termination, he added.

If convicted of all of the charges, Weaver could face up to 10 years behind bars.

Weaver will return to the 34th District Court for a pre-trial examination at 9 a.m. on April 11.











Detroit cop who allegedly shot at husband to be charged
Detroit Free Press, MI
March 29, 2007
BY BEN SCHMITT
http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070329/NEWS01/70329032/0/SPORTS02

Prosecutors charged a Detroit Police officer with a felony Thursday for allegedly shooting her department-issued weapon at her husband during a domestic dispute Wednesday.

Lathuya Weaver, 30, allegedly fired the gun at her 38-year-old husband inside their Romulus home at 1:10 a.m. He wasn't hit and police responded after someone called 911.

Weaver is charged with discharge of a weapon in a building and felonious assault, both four-year felonies.

She is expected to be arraigned this afternoon in Romulus.










Detroit Police Officer Charged with Felonious Assault
WXYZ, MI
Mar 29, 2007
http://www.wxyz.com/news/local/story.aspx?content_id=324ea839-a817-4d10-b7f8-fa8cc1403519

An off duty Detroit police officer is being charged with a felony for allegedly firing her department-issued weapon during a domestic dispute. Lathuya Weaver, 30, allegedly fired her gun at another person inside her Romulus home early Wednesday morning. That person was not hit. Weaver is being charged with felonious assault and discharge of a weapon, both are four year felonies.









Officer Arraigned on assault
FOX 2 Detroit
March 28, 2007
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=2793550&version=2&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=VSTY&pageId=3.1.1

A Detroit Police officer faced a judge Thursday for allegedly opening fire on her husband. 30-year-old Lathuya Weaver was arraigned on charges, including felonious assault. Police say she fired a shot at her husband from her service revolver. It happened early Wednesday morning during a domestic dispute at their Romulus home. The husband was not injured.




MI POLICE OFFICER INVOLVED PERPETRATED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LAW ENFORCEMENT MURDER SUICIDE]

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